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(Washington Post)   If you live in Los Angeles, Salt Lake City, or Denver, you may not have enough fresh water by the end of summer. Get outdoors now and enjoy the fresh air because it's gonna be burning in a month   (washingtonpost.com) divider line
    More: Scary, Colorado River, upper Colorado River basin, headwaters of the Colorado River, Lake Powell inflows, Lake Powell, beginning of April, Hydrology, southern portion of the upper basin  
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2470 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Apr 2021 at 1:50 PM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-04-17 11:32:20 AM  
Duh, it's in the name, SALT Lake City.
 
2021-04-17 1:53:42 PM  
People from Kansas think it's a damn utopia and end up moving there.

Jokes on them I guess?
 
2021-04-17 1:54:05 PM  
Not if the forests are properly raked, and you don't let all that fresh water in the revers spill into the ocean.  Geez, an expert has already told you this.
 
2021-04-17 1:54:24 PM  
I can't believe anyone thought settling the desert was a good idea. Oh, well.

We've got room for all of you around the Great Lakes.

greatlakesecho.orgView Full Size
 
2021-04-17 1:54:43 PM  

IDisME: Not if the forests are properly raked, and you don't let all that fresh water in the revers spill into the ocean.  Geez, an expert has already told you this.


*rivers
 
2021-04-17 1:56:05 PM  
NW Oregon issued a red-flag fire warning yesterday because of ridiculously dry conditions and high winds. I think this is the first time I've seen a warning like that in April. I have a bad feeling about this summer.
 
2021-04-17 1:56:32 PM  
I get that we're all supposed to be focused/mad at the dickheads watering their lawns, but any article about west coast water shortages that don't lead with the word "Nestle" are being disingenuous, I feel.
 
2021-04-17 1:57:49 PM  
Come move to my crap-bag little southern town. We just got rid of a Confederate monument and we gots plenty o' fresh water. (Oh, wait, you need good schools, too??)
 
2021-04-17 1:58:49 PM  
If theyre smart, west coast states will pump a lot of that infrastructure cash into desalinization tech.
 
2021-04-17 1:59:57 PM  
Right now, in a Denver suburb, there's an absolute farkload of snow on everything.

Imma take TWO hot showers today.
 
2021-04-17 2:02:41 PM  
Yeah but everyone in LA drinks bottled mineral water so no big deal.
 
2021-04-17 2:04:39 PM  
good thing climate change is a myth.
 
2021-04-17 2:06:20 PM  

Wanderlusting: I can't believe anyone thought settling the desert was a good idea. Oh, well.

We've got room for all of you around the Great Lakes.

[greatlakesecho.org image 850x609]


When English-speaking people began settling in the western portion of the USA, they were unaware that the western portion was experiencing an abnormally wet era. It was only after the west was settled did climate scientists learn that the west is historically a very dry place.
 
2021-04-17 2:06:32 PM  
It's gonna be a busy fire season.

If your personal situation allows, please consider donating time or money to the American Red Cross
 
2021-04-17 2:07:41 PM  

leeto2: good thing climate change is a myth.


Actually, the climate in the western USA is reverting back to the way it was before English-speaking people started settling there.
 
2021-04-17 2:09:19 PM  

gonegirl: Right now, in a Denver suburb, there's an absolute farkload of snow on everything.

Imma take TWO hot showers today.


Denver April means that farkload of snow is going to melt next day.  We just need to get people to stop watering their damn lawns everyday and we should be good.
 
2021-04-17 2:12:36 PM  

Alebak: If theyre smart, west coast states will pump a lot of that infrastructure cash into desalinization tech.


Problem with desal is it has a lot of nasty byproducts.

Also there is a finite amount of water on the planet.
Not many icy asteroids crash here anymore.
Water that gets drained from the sea to make potable water only has a small percentage that ends up back in the sea.

The earth's marine ecosystem is already stressed hard.

Intelligent use of the fresh water we have is a better solution, problem is that requires intelligent humans.
 
2021-04-17 2:12:57 PM  
Nuclear power and desalination plants are the future.

Color the salt byproduct blue, call it Appalachian and sell it at a premium.
 
2021-04-17 2:13:26 PM  
"Colorado River Basin's snowpack season earns low grades..."

Should have studied harder.
 
2021-04-17 2:13:26 PM  

DethZero: gonegirl: Right now, in a Denver suburb, there's an absolute farkload of snow on everything.

Imma take TWO hot showers today.

Denver April means that farkload of snow is going to melt next day.  We just need to get people to stop watering their damn lawns everyday and we should be good.


During the last blizzard, I had a friend living in North Dakota worriedly text me to ask if I was okay, with all the snow.

Lady, your concern is adorable, but Colorado snow isn't like North Dakota snow. I'll be in flipflops in two days.
 
2021-04-17 2:15:50 PM  

Alebak: If theyre smart, west coast states will pump a lot of that infrastructure cash into desalinization tech.


They're not. It will be wasted on stupid shiat.
 
2021-04-17 2:17:32 PM  

Alebak: If theyre smart, west coast states will pump a lot of that infrastructure cash into desalinization tech.


The truth of the matter (and I work in the water industry): there is no magic bullet and no new large source of fresh water to tap anymore. We are not getting mythical pipelines from the Great Lakes or desal plants that are cheap and affordable and power neutral. 

We are maxing out our finite resources. VP Harris announced that the US would wage wars for water so maybe we will get a little form taking it from other regions but if we are at that point we are already screwed.

A man made disaster a century in the making and all the Cassandra's were ignored.
 
2021-04-17 2:18:08 PM  
If global warming is real then explain why there's still ice in my freezer.

Checkmate, liberals
 
2021-04-17 2:21:06 PM  

DethZero: gonegirl: Right now, in a Denver suburb, there's an absolute farkload of snow on everything.

Imma take TWO hot showers today.

Denver April means that farkload of snow is going to melt next day.  We just need to get people to stop watering their damn lawns everyday and we should be good.


Salt Lake, too. At least it hasn't been a hot spring. Not only do we need enough snow to create the snowpack, it can't melt too early or it all runs off. But we've already had 3 times where it was 80 one day and snow a day or two later, only to be back to sunny 2 days after that. Gotta love Spring, it keeps things interesting.
 
2021-04-17 2:23:13 PM  

Wanderlusting: I can't believe anyone thought settling the desert was a good idea. Oh, well.

We've got room for all of you around the Great Lakes.

[greatlakesecho.org image 850x609]


You should Google up the exciting plans to build a pipeline from the Great Lakes to Phoenix sometime.
 
2021-04-17 2:25:11 PM  
LA? Doesn't its water come mostly from the Sierra Nevada? Quick read of the linked piece and I only saw it talk about snowpack in the Colorado River watershed.
 
2021-04-17 2:25:38 PM  

Muzzleloader: Alebak: If theyre smart, west coast states will pump a lot of that infrastructure cash into desalinization tech.

Problem with desal is it has a lot of nasty byproducts.

Also there is a finite amount of water on the planet.
Not many icy asteroids crash here anymore.
Water that gets drained from the sea to make potable water only has a small percentage that ends up back in the sea.

The earth's marine ecosystem is already stressed hard.

Intelligent use of the fresh water we have is a better solution, problem is that requires intelligent humans.


If people would just stop eating meat then we could use all the animals to make yarn and use the yarn to make fabric and the fabric to make a huge rug and then we can sweep the effluent from desalinization plants under it.
 
2021-04-17 2:30:37 PM  

gonegirl: Right now, in a Denver suburb, there's an absolute farkload of snow on everything.

Imma take TWO hot showers today.


Haven't lived here long have ya?
 
2021-04-17 2:30:49 PM  

Dodo David: When English-speaking people began settling in the western portion of the USA, they were unaware that the western portion was experiencing an abnormally wet era. It was only after the west was settled did climate scientists learn that the west is historically a very dry place.


...for varying definitions of "dry," sure...
 
2021-04-17 2:31:17 PM  

DethZero: gonegirl: Right now, in a Denver suburb, there's an absolute farkload of snow on everything.

Imma take TWO hot showers today.

Denver April means that farkload of snow is going to melt next day.  We just need to get people to stop watering their damn lawns everyday and we should be good.


Tax water use.
 
2021-04-17 2:32:47 PM  

gonegirl: DethZero: gonegirl: Right now, in a Denver suburb, there's an absolute farkload of snow on everything.

Imma take TWO hot showers today.

Denver April means that farkload of snow is going to melt next day.  We just need to get people to stop watering their damn lawns everyday and we should be good.

During the last blizzard, I had a friend living in North Dakota worriedly text me to ask if I was okay, with all the snow.

Lady, your concern is adorable, but Colorado snow isn't like North Dakota snow. I'll be in flipflops in two days.


While I'm spamming the thread.

The suburbs should be allowed to choke on their own inefficiency.
 
2021-04-17 2:36:11 PM  

Mikey1969: Salt Lake, too. At least it hasn't been a hot spring. Not only do we need enough snow to create the snowpack, it can't melt too early or it all runs off. But we've already had 3 times where it was 80 one day and snow a day or two later, only to be back to sunny 2 days after that. Gotta love Spring, it keeps things interesting.


Hey. We just got like 3 days of rain. Drought problem is solved!

/s

They really ought to be providing incentives to get rid of grass and xeriscape.
 
2021-04-17 2:40:08 PM  

Surrender your boo-tah: gonegirl: Right now, in a Denver suburb, there's an absolute farkload of snow on everything.

Imma take TWO hot showers today.

Haven't lived here long have ya?


. . . fifteen years at irregular intervals, I'd say.
 
2021-04-17 2:41:30 PM  

Muzzleloader: Alebak: If theyre smart, west coast states will pump a lot of that infrastructure cash into desalinization tech.

Problem with desal is it has a lot of nasty byproducts.

Also there is a finite amount of water on the planet.
Not many icy asteroids crash here anymore.
Water that gets drained from the sea to make potable water only has a small percentage that ends up back in the sea.

The earth's marine ecosystem is already stressed hard.

Intelligent use of the fresh water we have is a better solution, problem is that requires intelligent humans.


There's some structure for a desal in Santa Barbara iirc.

Another piece of the problem is how do you pipe the stuff back uphill cheaply.  oceans tens to be sea level.
 
2021-04-17 2:44:42 PM  
You mean that a week plus of near 80 and bright blue sky is abnormal here in Portland in April

We have a new season now: smoke season
 
2021-04-17 2:45:59 PM  

Telephone Sanitizer Second Class: NW Oregon issued a red-flag fire warning yesterday because of ridiculously dry conditions and high winds. I think this is the first time I've seen a warning like that in April. I have a bad feeling about this summer.


I do, too.

Our Spring has been very dry and that typically means a more active Hurricane season.

I worry we're going to get our fair share of water and then some while the West scorches.

I hate when that happens.
 
2021-04-17 2:46:27 PM  
Looks like it's time to direct even more of the Colorado River over to the Eastern Slope. Tough shiat, Arizona.
 
2021-04-17 2:47:12 PM  

Speaker2Animals: LA? Doesn't its water come mostly from the Sierra Nevada? Quick read of the linked piece and I only saw it talk about snowpack in the Colorado River watershed.


I lived in Bishop for a year in the 1980's. The Sierra looked like the Swiss Alps back then. During the lockdown, I decided to Google street view around town to see what it looked like now. What I really noticed was there wasn't very much snow at all on those mountains that used to be covered all year...it kind of broke my heart.
 
2021-04-17 2:49:44 PM  

powhound: Mikey1969: Salt Lake, too. At least it hasn't been a hot spring. Not only do we need enough snow to create the snowpack, it can't melt too early or it all runs off. But we've already had 3 times where it was 80 one day and snow a day or two later, only to be back to sunny 2 days after that. Gotta love Spring, it keeps things interesting.

Hey. We just got like 3 days of rain. Drought problem is solved!

/s

They really ought to be providing incentives to get rid of grass and xeriscape.


rain barrels are a cheap and easy weekend project that come in handy now and then

grass lawns are foolish and so are the fines some towns here levy for having brown grass

"draught? who cares! crank up that sprinkler system or else!"
 
2021-04-17 2:51:48 PM  

Muzzleloader: Alebak: If theyre smart, west coast states will pump a lot of that infrastructure cash into desalinization tech.

Problem with desal is it has a lot of nasty byproducts.

Also there is a finite amount of water on the planet.
Not many icy asteroids crash here anymore.
Water that gets drained from the sea to make potable water only has a small percentage that ends up back in the sea.

The earth's marine ecosystem is already stressed hard.

Intelligent use of the fresh water we have is a better solution, problem is that requires intelligent humans.


Citation Needed

There are 4 major fates. Transpiration --- basically evaporation via plants, straight up evaporation, ground water, flows to the sea. Water that goes into ground water can be held there for some time but we're pumping out ground water way faster than it's going in and that mostly goes to evaporation/transpiration.

We're not boing to deplete the oceans via desal.  Done on a very aggressive scale, we may wind up creating some mildly high salinity zones where we exhaust enriched saline but that is something that we can probably safely manage by piping it about a mile out into currents.
 
2021-04-17 2:52:34 PM  

hogans: Dodo David: When English-speaking people began settling in the western portion of the USA, they were unaware that the western portion was experiencing an abnormally wet era. It was only after the west was settled did climate scientists learn that the west is historically a very dry place.

...for varying definitions of "dry," sure...


"Less wet".
 
2021-04-17 2:56:44 PM  
I live in an area of Salt Lake City that does not meter water
I live in a desert valley and can use as much water as I like for $20 a month
 
2021-04-17 2:57:58 PM  

SirEattonHogg: Yeah but everyone in LA drinks bottled mineral water so no big deal.


drink it? I thought they showered in it.
 
2021-04-17 2:58:40 PM  

BigNumber12: Looks like it's time to direct even more of the Colorado River over to the Eastern Slope. Tough shiat, Arizona.


It isn't Arizona you are gonna have to contend with. It's California.
 
2021-04-17 3:02:44 PM  
Meh.  Atlanta and most of GA is always at drought level.  We survive, in spite of government policies that exacerbate the problem.  Every single time a water issue pops up, it doesn't matter whose region it's in, the government (state, county, city, probably even the Feds by now) all shrug and do the least effective patch possible and leave it for someone else to fix in the next administration.

At least out west, there are a few responsible adults trying to address the issue.
 
2021-04-17 3:06:39 PM  

zjoik: Muzzleloader: Alebak: If theyre smart, west coast states will pump a lot of that infrastructure cash into desalinization tech.

Problem with desal is it has a lot of nasty byproducts.

Also there is a finite amount of water on the planet.
Not many icy asteroids crash here anymore.
Water that gets drained from the sea to make potable water only has a small percentage that ends up back in the sea.

The earth's marine ecosystem is already stressed hard.

Intelligent use of the fresh water we have is a better solution, problem is that requires intelligent humans.

There's some structure for a desal in Santa Barbara iirc.

Another piece of the problem is how do you pipe the stuff back uphill cheaply.  oceans tens to be sea level.


Oh man.  Wait until you hear that about these things called wells.

Honestly, I don't think the piping it uphill part is a problem at all.
 
2021-04-17 3:14:24 PM  

Muzzleloader: Alebak: If theyre smart, west coast states will pump a lot of that infrastructure cash into desalinization tech.

Problem with desal is it has a lot of nasty byproducts.

Also there is a finite amount of water on the planet.
Not many icy asteroids crash here anymore.
Water that gets drained from the sea to make potable water only has a small percentage that ends up back in the sea.


Do what now?
 
2021-04-17 3:16:07 PM  

cheap_thoughts: People from Kansas think it's a damn utopia and end up moving there.

Jokes on them I guess?


Not when the alternative is living in farking Wichita.
 
2021-04-17 3:17:59 PM  

taintbaggins: I live in an area of Salt Lake City that does not meter water
I live in a desert valley and can use as much water as I like for $20 a month


I'm pretty sure that Murray charges a premium if over a certain amount. At least go after the people who love their grass. I quit watering our grass years ago. One of these days I'll get it xeriscaped. I only water flowers to make the bees and butterflies happy and some veggies.
 
2021-04-17 3:21:32 PM  

Telephone Sanitizer Second Class: NW Oregon issued a red-flag fire warning yesterday because of ridiculously dry conditions and high winds. I think this is the first time I've seen a warning like that in April. I have a bad feeling about this summer.


NW CA is going to be the same. None of our rivers are anywhere close to flow levels they need to be at. At least two (Van Duzen and Mattole) are looking to run dry come August.
 
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