Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Wired)   New book reveals Spock is actually terrible at logic   (wired.com) divider line
    More: Silly  
•       •       •

1564 clicks; posted to Fandom » on 17 Apr 2021 at 6:20 AM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



69 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2021-04-17 6:55:13 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-04-17 7:03:10 AM  
It's almost as if there was some hidden point to there being three differing personalities at the centre of the show... hmmm.
 
2021-04-17 7:14:24 AM  
Vulcans are not logical.

The definition of Vulcan logic changes from decade to decade and from writer to writer. In the 60's Vulcan logic was arming yourself to the teeth with a phaser rifle, in the 70's, Vulcan logic was lighting candles and mediation. By the 90's the writers invented "Vulcan Priests", and praying. So much for logic.

The entire concept of a race that suppresses all of its emotions make no sense. And they have no emotions but Spock plays a musical instrument? What is music for if you're not supposed to feel anything?

They have tradition. That's illogical. "We've always done it this way" is not a logical reason to do anything.

Pon Far also makes no sense.  Mating once every 7 years, with a 170 year life span, gives you about 20 chances to have sex in your entire life, (assuming you're too young for the first 3 and too old for the last 2). And according to Enterprise, the women have it too, which makes the odds of any two people having (needing) sex at the same time are really slim.How did evolution come up with that? Where is the survival advantage, or reproductive advantage in "Pon Far?"
 
2021-04-17 7:21:16 AM  
FTFA: lots of people don't behave the way he thinks they-rationally -should behave. And yet he fails to learn from those instances of missed predictions because instead he just shrugs and says, 'Well, the world didn't behave the way it should have.'

So basically, he's an economist.
 
2021-04-17 7:34:46 AM  

brainlordmesomorph: Pon Far also makes no sense.


The Pon Far episode in Enterprise was just the worst Fan Service.

One of the strangest things about the whole Star Trek franchise is that its fans wibble on about what an amazing vision it is of a progressive, optimistic, egalitarian future. And yet that future perpetuates 20th century sexual and role stereotypes and rarely misses an opportunity to sexualize its female characters.

Also, post-TOS writers all seem to share the same kink about pouring an insanely hot babe into a skintight catsuit and then having her be devoid of emotion and completely obliviousness to her own sexuality.

To be clear, I quite like much of Trek. I just can't stand the pompous sanctimoniousness of its worst fans.
 
2021-04-17 7:46:37 AM  

HugeMistake: Also, post-TOS writers all seem to share the same kink about pouring an insanely hot babe into a skintight catsuit and then having her be devoid of emotion and completely obliviousness to her own sexuality.


Jerri Ryan saved Voyager from cancellation, and she proved so popular, that they tried to recreate her with T'pol. but that was just ridiculous.

21st century Trek leans less on the eye-candy, and avoids most of the 20th century misogyny.
 
2021-04-17 8:09:14 AM  

brainlordmesomorph: HugeMistake: Also, post-TOS writers all seem to share the same kink about pouring an insanely hot babe into a skintight catsuit and then having her be devoid of emotion and completely obliviousness to her own sexuality.

Jerri Ryan saved Voyager from cancellation, and she proved so popular, that they tried to recreate her with T'pol. but that was just ridiculous.

21st century Trek leans less on the eye-candy, and avoids most of the 20th century misogyny.


Wasn't "Discovery" the first Star Trek show to show titties?
 
2021-04-17 8:17:44 AM  

brainlordmesomorph: The entire concept of a race that suppresses all of its emotions make no sense.


They have emotions, but they're too strong to be practically tolerable in a social society.  Which is another breed of nonsense, of course, because they'd never have become an advanced social species if they were always getting upset and committing acts of violence against each other.

However, accept that first bit.  They have emotions, but they're inconveniently strong.  They've developed a culture of emotional repression.  Denying there is any emotion left is just part of that self-deception.  Vulcans love, they hate, they fear, they have jealousy and pride.  They can be devious.  They also have an incredible amount of control over obvious outward expressions of those emotions.

So they have childhood bullies, they have romantic attractions, they lie, etc.  Logic is just the framework they use to keep themselves from acting on their emotions without careful consideration, it doesn't supply their motivations.

The writers finally acknowledged this in the original series movies, when they had Spock say, "Logic is the beginning of wisdom, not the end of it".  Then TNG brought Spock back and had him somehow forget that bit of enlightenment and revert to his old personality of full denial including lying to himself.  But his father knew the truth, and Spock figured it out again (if I recall correctly, in the new movies his older self instructed his younger self).

And as for why Spock was so often wrong on the old show?  The same reason Worf always got his ass handed to him on TNG: to make a point the writers wanted to make.
 
2021-04-17 8:21:49 AM  
Does the author know that Spock is a fictional character created by a screen writer for a TV show?
 
2021-04-17 8:31:20 AM  

HugeMistake: Also, post-TOS writers all seem to share the same kink about pouring an insanely hot babe into a skintight catsuit and then having her be devoid of emotion and completely obliviousness to her own sexuality.


This is my inner armchair-psychologist speaking, and one without even an entry-level psych course under his belt, but I think maybe that's because it appeals to the awkward nerd viewers (while not exactly offending the less awkward).  Imagine, a hot sexy woman who doesn't understand why you're staring at her cleavage and camel toe, and isn't bothered by it!  And she has something obviously wrong with her emotionally that only the love and support of a white knight can fix, after which she'll gratefully bang your pelvis to a fine powder.
 
2021-04-17 8:56:08 AM  

Unscratchable_Itch: Does the author know that Spock is a fictional character created by a screen writer for a TV show?


Yeah, Spock is by definition great at logic.

Hollywood writers, tho...
 
2021-04-17 9:18:33 AM  

brainlordmesomorph: Vulcans are not logical.

The definition of Vulcan logic changes from decade to decade and from writer to writer. In the 60's Vulcan logic was arming yourself to the teeth with a phaser rifle, in the 70's, Vulcan logic was lighting candles and mediation. By the 90's the writers invented "Vulcan Priests", and praying. So much for logic.


And we're back to the 60s on ST:Disco.  See also, 'Vulcan Hello'.


Pon Far also makes no sense.  Mating once every 7 years, with a 170 year life span, gives you about 20 chances to have sex in your entire life, (assuming you're too young for the first 3 and too old for the last 2). And according to Enterprise, the women have it too, which makes the odds of any two people having (needing) sex at the same time are really slim.How did evolution come up with that? Where is the survival advantage, or reproductive advantage in "Pon Far?"

Point of order:  I've always understood that Vulcans can do the nasty any doggoned time they want - but during pon farr, it's a biological imperative; they got to get down.  (And on reflection; maybe not even then - does anybody actually remember Spock getting all jiggy with it on 'TOS: Amok Time' ?)
 
2021-04-17 9:29:14 AM  

Unsung_Hero: brainlordmesomorph: The entire concept of a race that suppresses all of its emotions make no sense.

They have emotions, but they're too strong to be practically tolerable in a social society.  Which is another breed of nonsense, of course, because they'd never have become an advanced social species if they were always getting upset and committing acts of violence against each other.

However, accept that first bit.  They have emotions, but they're inconveniently strong.  They've developed a culture of emotional repression.  Denying there is any emotion left is just part of that self-deception.  Vulcans love, they hate, they fear, they have jealousy and pride.  They can be devious.  They also have an incredible amount of control over obvious outward expressions of those emotions.

So they have childhood bullies, they have romantic attractions, they lie, etc.  Logic is just the framework they use to keep themselves from acting on their emotions without careful consideration, it doesn't supply their motivations.

The writers finally acknowledged this in the original series movies, when they had Spock say, "Logic is the beginning of wisdom, not the end of it".  Then TNG brought Spock back and had him somehow forget that bit of enlightenment and revert to his old personality of full denial including lying to himself.  But his father knew the truth, and Spock figured it out again (if I recall correctly, in the new movies his older self instructed his younger self).

And as for why Spock was so often wrong on the old show?  The same reason Worf always got his ass handed to him on TNG: to make a point the writers wanted to make.


Came to the thread to make the Worf getting his ass kicked reference.
 
2021-04-17 9:35:07 AM  

Unsung_Hero: HugeMistake: Also, post-TOS writers all seem to share the same kink about pouring an insanely hot babe into a skintight catsuit and then having her be devoid of emotion and completely obliviousness to her own sexuality.

This is my inner armchair-psychologist speaking, and one without even an entry-level psych course under his belt, but I think maybe that's because it appeals to the awkward nerd viewers (while not exactly offending the less awkward).  Imagine, a hot sexy woman who doesn't understand why you're staring at her cleavage and camel toe, and isn't bothered by it!  And she has something obviously wrong with her emotionally that only the love and support of a white knight can fix, after which she'll gratefully bang your pelvis to a fine powder.


Yep. I suspect there's also an element of allowing them to believe that if the woman has no idea how hot she is, then even an "average" nerd has a shot.
 
2021-04-17 10:12:03 AM  
Remember when Spock brought this to Captain Kirk's attention?

Captain Kirk deals with a strange alien culture
Youtube DMoWt0wnlUw
 
2021-04-17 10:41:26 AM  

Unsung_Hero: brainlordmesomorph: The entire concept of a race that suppresses all of its emotions make no sense.

They have emotions, but they're too strong to be practically tolerable in a social society.  Which is another breed of nonsense, of course, because they'd never have become an advanced social species if they were always getting upset and committing acts of violence against each other.

However, accept that first bit.  They have emotions, but they're inconveniently strong.  They've developed a culture of emotional repression.  Denying there is any emotion left is just part of that self-deception.  Vulcans love, they hate, they fear, they have jealousy and pride.  They can be devious.  They also have an incredible amount of control over obvious outward expressions of those emotions.

So they have childhood bullies, they have romantic attractions, they lie, etc.  Logic is just the framework they use to keep themselves from acting on their emotions without careful consideration, it doesn't supply their motivations.

The writers finally acknowledged this in the original series movies, when they had Spock say, "Logic is the beginning of wisdom, not the end of it".  Then TNG brought Spock back and had him somehow forget that bit of enlightenment and revert to his old personality of full denial including lying to himself.  But his father knew the truth, and Spock figured it out again (if I recall correctly, in the new movies his older self instructed his younger self).

And as for why Spock was so often wrong on the old show?  The same reason Worf always got his ass handed to him on TNG: to make a point the writers wanted to make.


Spock is also not Vulcan, his dad was a Romulan in disguise.

trekmovie.comView Full Size
 
2021-04-17 10:51:46 AM  

UNC_Samurai: Spock is also not Vulcan, his dad was a Romulan in disguise.


I don't recall ever noticing myself, but IMDB says Marc Lenard also played a Klingon captain in the first Star Trek movie.  Mostly he was Sarek, though.

In-universe, it's appropriate to note that Spock was not fully Vulcan as he was a human-vulcan hybrid.  And much like Worf reacting to being raised by humans by trying to be 'more Klingon than Klingons', Spock often seemed to have some kind of Stockholm Syndrome going on and was always trying to be a paragon of Vulcans.
 
2021-04-17 10:54:14 AM  

Unsung_Hero: UNC_Samurai: Spock is also not Vulcan, his dad was a Romulan in disguise.

I don't recall ever noticing myself, but IMDB says Marc Lenard also played a Klingon captain in the first Star Trek movie.  Mostly he was Sarek, though.

In-universe, it's appropriate to note that Spock was not fully Vulcan as he was a human-vulcan hybrid.  And much like Worf reacting to being raised by humans by trying to be 'more Klingon than Klingons', Spock often seemed to have some kind of Stockholm Syndrome going on and was always trying to be a paragon of Vulcans.


All of the not-human characters have a foot in both worlds (Spock, Worf, Troi, even Data has Lore, Odo).  It's the literary dichotomy of not being fully accepted by either world, such that their "family" becomes their fellow crew.
 
2021-04-17 11:04:59 AM  

ModernLuddite: brainlordmesomorph: HugeMistake: Also, post-TOS writers all seem to share the same kink about pouring an insanely hot babe into a skintight catsuit and then having her be devoid of emotion and completely obliviousness to her own sexuality.

Jerri Ryan saved Voyager from cancellation, and she proved so popular, that they tried to recreate her with T'pol. but that was just ridiculous.

21st century Trek leans less on the eye-candy, and avoids most of the 20th century misogyny.

Wasn't "Discovery" the first Star Trek show to show titties?


Hypothetically, let's say I have this friend, right? And this friend has seen all of Discovery, but doesn't recall seeing tits. Could you maybe narrow that down to like an episode or even whose tits showed up?
 
2021-04-17 11:06:52 AM  

Unsung_Hero: UNC_Samurai: Spock is also not Vulcan, his dad was a Romulan in disguise.

I don't recall ever noticing myself, but IMDB says Marc Lenard also played a Klingon captain in the first Star Trek movie.  Mostly he was Sarek, though.

In-universe, it's appropriate to note that Spock was not fully Vulcan as he was a human-vulcan hybrid.  And much like Worf reacting to being raised by humans by trying to be 'more Klingon than Klingons', Spock often seemed to have some kind of Stockholm Syndrome going on and was always trying to be a paragon of Vulcans.


I now have White Zombie playing in my head with modified lyrics.
 
2021-04-17 11:17:04 AM  

Quantumbunny: ModernLuddite: brainlordmesomorph: HugeMistake: Also, post-TOS writers all seem to share the same kink about pouring an insanely hot babe into a skintight catsuit and then having her be devoid of emotion and completely obliviousness to her own sexuality.

Jerri Ryan saved Voyager from cancellation, and she proved so popular, that they tried to recreate her with T'pol. but that was just ridiculous.

21st century Trek leans less on the eye-candy, and avoids most of the 20th century misogyny.

Wasn't "Discovery" the first Star Trek show to show titties?

Hypothetically, let's say I have this friend, right? And this friend has seen all of Discovery, but doesn't recall seeing tits. Could you maybe narrow that down to like an episode or even whose tits showed up?


L'Rell banging Tyler. Brief glimpse of Klingon nipple.
Highly non-erotic.
 
2021-04-17 11:17:14 AM  

Unsung_Hero: brainlordmesomorph: The entire concept of a race that suppresses all of its emotions make no sense.

They have emotions, but they're too strong to be practically tolerable in a social society.  Which is another breed of nonsense, of course, because they'd never have become an advanced social species if they were always getting upset and committing acts of violence against each other.

However, accept that first bit.  They have emotions, but they're inconveniently strong.  They've developed a culture of emotional repression.  Denying there is any emotion left is just part of that self-deception.  Vulcans love, they hate, they fear, they have jealousy and pride.  They can be devious.  They also have an incredible amount of control over obvious outward expressions of those emotions.

So they have childhood bullies, they have romantic attractions, they lie, etc.  Logic is just the framework they use to keep themselves from acting on their emotions without careful consideration, it doesn't supply their motivations.

The writers finally acknowledged this in the original series movies, when they had Spock say, "Logic is the beginning of wisdom, not the end of it".  Then TNG brought Spock back and had him somehow forget that bit of enlightenment and revert to his old personality of full denial including lying to himself.  But his father knew the truth, and Spock figured it out again (if I recall correctly, in the new movies his older self instructed his younger self).

And as for why Spock was so often wrong on the old show?  The same reason Worf always got his ass handed to him on TNG: to make a point the writers wanted to make.


Look at us, the number of wars, killings, hate crimes... There are many of us who would claim our emotions are too strong, and too many of us succumb to emotion over using logic constantly.

To me, the Vulcans are are intended to be future us when we've moved past hate, wars, religion, greed, etc and society had agreed to focus on there betterment because they've learned how bad emotions impact the environment, other people, etc.

Viewed through that lens it's funny to see the Romulans who left because they want that emotion, that strife, the pain, the struggle... to move forward. Spite is a powerful motivator, and I can see a swath of society that refused to eschew emotions splitting off.

I wish we did focus more on logic and teaching people that emotions are something to suppress and overcome, not something you give into or show in polite society.
 
2021-04-17 11:17:59 AM  

swahnhennessy: Quantumbunny: ModernLuddite: brainlordmesomorph: HugeMistake: Also, post-TOS writers all seem to share the same kink about pouring an insanely hot babe into a skintight catsuit and then having her be devoid of emotion and completely obliviousness to her own sexuality.

Jerri Ryan saved Voyager from cancellation, and she proved so popular, that they tried to recreate her with T'pol. but that was just ridiculous.

21st century Trek leans less on the eye-candy, and avoids most of the 20th century misogyny.

Wasn't "Discovery" the first Star Trek show to show titties?

Hypothetically, let's say I have this friend, right? And this friend has seen all of Discovery, but doesn't recall seeing tits. Could you maybe narrow that down to like an episode or even whose tits showed up?

L'Rell banging Tyler. Brief glimpse of Klingon nipple.
Highly non-erotic.


Oh... Easy to see why someone would miss that. Thanks
 
2021-04-17 11:28:58 AM  

Quantumbunny: it's funny to see the Romulans who left because they want that emotion


Which confused me as a child but amuses me as an adult.  The Romulans are clearly very much in control of their emotions, far beyond that of the Vulcans who give up the practice of suppressing theirs.  This seems to show the Vulcan version of their history as a lie.

Extrapolating from what's been shown, it makes me wonder if the half of the population split that became Vulcans wasn't made up of the worst crazies who, under the leadership of a particularly charismatic cult leader, learned to control it enough to organize and boot the future Romulans out.  Romulans, who in turn became fascists out of fear of another group of crazies rising up in their midst again.
 
2021-04-17 11:38:22 AM  
Any shortcoming in Spock logic is merely treksplained away by his human ancestry.
 
2021-04-17 11:52:13 AM  
Once, years ago, a man tried to write a Western while the Space Race was in its prime.  Don't overthink it.
 
2021-04-17 11:57:40 AM  

Uncontrolled_Jibe: Once, years ago, a man tried to write a Western while the Space Race was in its prime. Don't overthink it.


His early attempts at appealing to kids and merchandising show he wasn't nearly as clever as George Lucas.  And then came the whole Wesley thing, and of course Roddenberry's ridiculously ill-considered economic system for the Federation.

I don't think Star Trek succeeded because of Roddenberry.  I think it succeeded because it got some damn good writing for the era, and generally treated it seriously.  And once there was enough material from all those writers having a go at it, it took on a life of its own.

And there's nothing particularly wrong with having some fun looking at the holes in that material, or even trying to come up with fixes for them.
 
2021-04-17 12:06:48 PM  

Quantumbunny: ModernLuddite: brainlordmesomorph: HugeMistake: Also, post-TOS writers all seem to share the same kink about pouring an insanely hot babe into a skintight catsuit and then having her be devoid of emotion and completely obliviousness to her own sexuality.

Jerri Ryan saved Voyager from cancellation, and she proved so popular, that they tried to recreate her with T'pol. but that was just ridiculous.

21st century Trek leans less on the eye-candy, and avoids most of the 20th century misogyny.

Wasn't "Discovery" the first Star Trek show to show titties?

Hypothetically, let's say I have this friend, right? And this friend has seen all of Discovery, but doesn't recall seeing tits. Could you maybe narrow that down to like an episode or even whose tits showed up?


yeah, i ....uh....my friend also wants to know
 
2021-04-17 1:06:46 PM  
Fark user image
 
2021-04-17 1:16:00 PM  

neeNHA: Unscratchable_Itch: Does the author know that Spock is a fictional character created by a screen writer for a TV show?

Yeah, Spock is by definition great at logic.

Hollywood writers, tho...


There's the bias.  All of the times that Spock was right, nothing happened, so there was no episode to make about it.
 
2021-04-17 1:16:43 PM  
Hi analysis is fundamentally flawed.

FTFA:
The results, which appear in Galef's new book The Scout Mindset, are devastating. Not only does Spock have a terrible track record-events he describes as "impossible" happen 83 percent of the time-but his confidence level is actually anti-correlated with reality. "The more confident he says he is that something will happen-that the ship will crash, or that they will find survivors-the less likely it is to happen, and the less confident he is in something, the more likely it is to happen," Galef says.

The episodes on the show were about situations which challenged logic and expectations.
 
2021-04-17 1:19:28 PM  

Boudyro: [Fark user image 100x750]


Fark user imageView Full Size

*view image* *expand* just makes it blurry.
 
2021-04-17 1:22:44 PM  

mongbiohazard: Hi analysis is fundamentally flawed.


Well yeah, the author doesn't know the difference between probability and certainty.

I could predict that 100 coin tosses would average out to approximately 50/50 and be very, very wrong.  But the model's still valid and it would be logical to assume it will remain so unless something extraordinary was going on with reality.

Spock wasn't predicting with certainty, he gave probability estimates.  And I'm sure that (within the Star Trek universe) they were spot-on.  Kirk just kept getting lucky because, you know, plot armor and pluckiness and stuff.
 
2021-04-17 2:25:42 PM  

ZMugg: Boudyro: [Fark user image 100x750]

[Fark user image image 239x200]
*view image* *expand* just makes it blurry.


Fark sucks sometimes:

https://didyouknowfacts.com/humans-in​-​star-trek/

The image is the chain of comments shown in that article without some tool interjecting their own comments to justify calling it an article.
 
2021-04-17 2:42:30 PM  

Quantumbunny: Hypothetically, let's say I have this friend, right? And this friend has seen all of Discovery, but doesn't recall seeing tits. Could you maybe narrow that down to like an episode or even whose tits showed up?


Did you see the first episode of Stargate SG-1 ?  I had not until this week.  Just thought you might want to check it out.
 
2021-04-17 2:46:55 PM  

recondite cetacean: Did you see the first episode of Stargate SG-1 ? I had not until this week. Just thought you might want to check it out.


Oh man.  I mean, nice to look at, but definitely gratuitous.

I'm just as against covering people up when it's obviously for the censors and not the story, by the way.
 
2021-04-17 2:48:20 PM  
"Galef"?! sounds like a Klingon...
 
2021-04-17 2:54:39 PM  

Boudyro: ZMugg: Boudyro: [Fark user image 100x750]

[Fark user image image 239x200]
*view image* *expand* just makes it blurry.

Fark sucks sometimes:

https://didyouknowfacts.com/humans-in-​star-trek/

The image is the chain of comments shown in that article without some tool interjecting their own comments to justify calling it an article.


Thank you.
 
2021-04-17 3:08:42 PM  

ZMugg: Boudyro: [Fark user image 100x750]

[Fark user image image 239x200]
*view image* *expand* just makes it blurry.


https://m.imgur.com/gallery/2vBAY
 
2021-04-17 3:15:39 PM  

brainlordmesomorph: 21st century Trek leans less on the eye-candy, and avoids most of the 20th century misogyny.


TOS wasn't subtle at all about its T&A.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-04-17 3:16:19 PM  

recondite cetacean: Quantumbunny: Hypothetically, let's say I have this friend, right? And this friend has seen all of Discovery, but doesn't recall seeing tits. Could you maybe narrow that down to like an episode or even whose tits showed up?

Did you see the first episode of Stargate SG-1 ?  I had not until this week.  Just thought you might want to check it out.


They actually took those scenes out if you happen to buy the dvd sets now.  Of course, that was when the show was on Showtime, I believe.  So yeah, titties.
 
2021-04-17 3:21:55 PM  

some_beer_drinker: Quantumbunny: ModernLuddite: brainlordmesomorph: HugeMistake: Also, post-TOS writers all seem to share the same kink about pouring an insanely hot babe into a skintight catsuit and then having her be devoid of emotion and completely obliviousness to her own sexuality.

Jerri Ryan saved Voyager from cancellation, and she proved so popular, that they tried to recreate her with T'pol. but that was just ridiculous.

21st century Trek leans less on the eye-candy, and avoids most of the 20th century misogyny.

Wasn't "Discovery" the first Star Trek show to show titties?

Hypothetically, let's say I have this friend, right? And this friend has seen all of Discovery, but doesn't recall seeing tits. Could you maybe narrow that down to like an episode or even whose tits showed up?

yeah, i ....uh....my friend also wants to know


It was nu-Klingon boobies.  Definitely not the completely human boobies of the Duras sisters.
 
2021-04-17 3:24:37 PM  

BullBearMS: brainlordmesomorph: 21st century Trek leans less on the eye-candy, and avoids most of the 20th century misogyny.

TOS wasn't subtle at all about its T&A.

[Fark user image 850x425]


IIRC, Angelique Pettyjohn (2nd from left) offered 2 versions of that picture on a poster. One as shown here and for ~$15.00 more, one without the top.
 
2021-04-17 3:34:11 PM  

UNC_Samurai: ZMugg: Boudyro: [Fark user image 100x750]

[Fark user image image 239x200]
*view image* *expand* just makes it blurry.

https://m.imgur.com/gallery/2vBAY


The OP already posted a legible version, but thanks for the effort.
 
2021-04-17 5:05:02 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


Valeris: "Sir, I address you as a kindred intellect. Do you not recognize... that a turning point has been reached in the affairs of the Federation?"

Spock: "History is replete with turning points, Lieutenant. You must have faith."

Valeris: "Faith?"

Spock: "That the universe will unfold as it should."

Valeris: "But is this logical? Surely we must..."

Spock: "Logic? Logic is the beginning of wisdom, Valeris, not the end."
 
2021-04-17 5:48:28 PM  

mongbiohazard: Hi analysis is fundamentally flawed.

FTFA:
The results, which appear in Galef's new book The Scout Mindset, are devastating. Not only does Spock have a terrible track record-events he describes as "impossible" happen 83 percent of the time-but his confidence level is actually anti-correlated with reality. "The more confident he says he is that something will happen-that the ship will crash, or that they will find survivors-the less likely it is to happen, and the less confident he is in something, the more likely it is to happen," Galef says.

The episodes on the show were about situations which challenged logic and expectations.


We make medical shows about zebras and detective shows about unlikely crime solving so this shouldn't be surprising.
 
2021-04-17 5:51:36 PM  

Quantumbunny: I wish we did focus more on logic and teaching people that emotions are something to suppress and overcome, not something you give into or show in polite society.


Yes, let me turn the Amazon rain forest into luxury toothpicks to sell so I can live a life of leisure. The consequences will be so slow that I'll be dead by the time they arrive so this plan holds no downsides for me.

Logically speaking I have no reason not to do this.

/"logic" does not always lead to the socially desired outcome
//You need emotions to go there
 
2021-04-17 7:09:50 PM  
But isn't it just as racist to expect Spock to behave like a ______________, the same way it is for someone to expect a Black person or a Jewish person or an Asian person or a White person to behave like the stereotypes we have of those groups of people?
 
2021-04-17 7:15:58 PM  
FTA: Spock is using the words 'odds,' 'probability,' 'chance,' 'definitely,' 'probably,' etc.," she says. "I catalogued all instances in which Spock made a prediction and that prediction either came true or didn't."


Logic is not statistics.  If I'm going to roll a d6, it is logical to say I will not roll a 6, but that has no barring on whether I actually roll a 6 or not.

They get into saying that improbable things keep happening so, Spock should expect that, but that isn't logical.
 
2021-04-17 7:31:13 PM  

Sporkabob: FTA: Spock is using the words 'odds,' 'probability,' 'chance,' 'definitely,' 'probably,' etc.," she says. "I catalogued all instances in which Spock made a prediction and that prediction either came true or didn't."


Logic is not statistics.  If I'm going to roll a d6, it is logical to say I will not roll a 6, but that has no barring on whether I actually roll a 6 or not.

They get into saying that improbable things keep happening so, Spock should expect that, but that isn't logical.


Plus the episodes aren't a valid sample for this. They're not "random slices of time" in the life of a starship crew--they're packaged drama, self-selection in episode form. If we were able to catalog every moment of Spock's life, we'd likely see a lot more events where his predictions (about mundane events) were accurate.
 
Displayed 50 of 69 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.