Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Nature)   If you've wondered how many T. Rexes walked the earth, or inhabited California or called Washington DC home at any given time, welcome to Fark   (nature.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Dinosaur, population density of T. rex, Tyrannosaurus rex, Paleontology, Thomas Holtz, estimates of the total range of T. rex, body mass, best experience  
•       •       •

690 clicks; posted to STEM » on 15 Apr 2021 at 10:06 PM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



11 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-04-15 11:01:24 PM  
I bet they were as socially awkward as we are.
 
2021-04-16 12:28:38 AM  

RedVentrue: I bet they were as socially awkward as we are.


Nuh uh.

Nerd.
 
2021-04-16 12:45:32 AM  
In a million years, where would I go to find a fossilized human (or maybe just a modern animal like a whitetail deer?

Would it be the guys they dig up in the peat bogs in their fully compressed form?  Is it a mudslide that doesn't get fully excavated?  Are there certain rivers that we know of that bury a bunch of shiat in the sediment?

How about future oil/coal?  Where is that forming?

/I always ask as an honest question at various dinosaur nature centers, but never get a good answer.
 
2021-04-16 1:14:01 AM  

Dinodork: RedVentrue: I bet they were as socially awkward as we are.

Nuh uh.

Nerd.


Perfect handle, LOL
 
2021-04-16 3:26:52 AM  

RogermcAllen: In a million years, where would I go to find a fossilized human (or maybe just a modern animal like a whitetail deer?

Would it be the guys they dig up in the peat bogs in their fully compressed form?  Is it a mudslide that doesn't get fully excavated?  Are there certain rivers that we know of that bury a bunch of shiat in the sediment?

How about future oil/coal?  Where is that forming?

/I always ask as an honest question at various dinosaur nature centers, but never get a good answer.


Hang around a volcano and go out a hero

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-04-16 6:14:17 AM  
The team used their estimates of the total range of T. rexacross modern North America, combined with their estimates of the dinosaur's body mass, to calculate that, at any one time, around 20,000 T. rex would have been alive on the planet. That translates to around 3,800 T. rex in an area the size of California, or just two T. rex patrolling Washington DC.

I makes you wonder about how hard it would have been for them to find another T. rex to mate with, especially given the stupid street layout and huge number of one way streets in D.C.
 
2021-04-16 6:16:43 AM  
BTW, an *EXCELLENT* lecture about T. rex by Dr. David Hone at the Royal Institute.

How the Tyrannosaurs Ruled the World - with David Hone
Youtube f-jD7kQvyPs
 
2021-04-16 7:52:55 AM  
Those are sobering numbers.

Because it means there were vanishingly few T-Rex F-15 pilots. We'll probably never find a fossilized animal actually in the cockpit.
 
2021-04-16 8:29:13 AM  

dittybopper: BTW, an *EXCELLENT* lecture about T. rex by Dr. David Hone at the Royal Institute.

[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/f-jD7kQv​yPs]


Oh, and the Q&A afterwards is also worth it:

Q&A - How the Tyrannosaurs Ruled the World - with David Hone
Youtube eTWG5WY_XoM
 
2021-04-16 4:11:24 PM  
I have about 25 level 820+ tek rexes cryo'd in one of my fridges.  So, there.

/oh, real life?  nm
 
2021-04-16 6:43:12 PM  

RogermcAllen: How about future oil/coal?  Where is that forming?

/I always ask as an honest question at various dinosaur nature centers, but never get a good answer.


I can't speak to the oil, but if what I've read is true, it's unlikely the earth will ever create new, substantial coal deposits. There's a hypothesis (theory?) going around that there weren't any bacteria that could digest trees, back in the Carboniferous, so they didn't rot; they just got covered up and subject to heat and pressure, which turned them into coal. Now that there are bacteria that can digest trees, that won't happen in the future.
 
Displayed 11 of 11 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.