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(Medical Xpress)   Pop quiz, hotshots: How bad do you want to prevent the 'beetus?   (medicalxpress.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Protein, Amino acid, Nutrition, Diabetes mellitus type 2, Enzyme, Diabetes mellitus, Glucose, insect Tenebrio molitor  
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622 clicks; posted to STEM » on 14 Apr 2021 at 1:47 PM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



13 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-04-14 2:04:17 PM  
I have a flock of about 30 chickens and as a treat I buy 50lb. bags of dried mealworm online and feed it to my chickens. I..um, *accidentally* put some in my mouth and chewed and swallowed the mealworm and found it to be quite tasty. So tasty that I've found myself to be quite clumsy around the bag of mealworm as they keep accidentally getting in my mouth.

Although a sample size of 1, I feel I can attest to the fact that the consumption of mealworm does not do anything for the type 1 beetus.
 
2021-04-14 2:10:04 PM  
Not enough to focus on "alternate sources" of peptides with a retardant effect that we already get from traditional sources. Remember - read the studies, not the article. In particular, read the pertinent study, the one where they describe how it might be possible to get enough peptides from insects by subjecting them to multiple processing steps.

The article went full-on "Well, if A is good, and if it's possible to get A from B, then it stands to reason that we'll be using B to get A!" The study involving the use of food-derived peptides from food proteins for maintaining glucose homeostasis says "this is good." The studies that say "oooh, we can extract useful peptides from mealworms" says this is possible.

The fun part is that we can get those peptides, without expensive processing, from already-available milk & marine sources. In particular, this is what you gotta do to mealworms to get useful peptides - a round of ultrasound to break them down, followed by two separate rounds of enzymatic treatment:
ars.els-cdn.comView Full Size


Fun, eh?
 
2021-04-14 2:10:28 PM  
Scientists from the Bioreactors Research Group (BIO-110) of the University of Granada (UGR) have demonstrated that a natural treatment based on flour made from the insect Tenebrio molitor (more commonly known as the mealworm) can help prevent Type II diabetes mellitus.

Have they?

The study carried out at the UGR focused on obtaining peptides with an antidiabetic capacity and involved optimizing the release of peptides contained in the protein of Tenebrio molitor by means of enzymatic processes.

So what they've actually done is figured out how to extract and release peptides.  And they aren't even claiming they've figured out how to release the peptides in a bioavailable manner in the human body.  Plus, whether those peptides actually do anything useful is speculative at this point, and not part of this research anyway.

So, no, they haven't "demonstrated" anything like what's being claimed.
 
2021-04-14 2:20:28 PM  

pearls before swine: Scientists from the Bioreactors Research Group (BIO-110) of the University of Granada (UGR) have demonstrated that a natural treatment based on flour made from the insect Tenebrio molitor (more commonly known as the mealworm) can help prevent Type II diabetes mellitus.

Have they?

The study carried out at the UGR focused on obtaining peptides with an antidiabetic capacity and involved optimizing the release of peptides contained in the protein of Tenebrio molitor by means of enzymatic processes.

So what they've actually done is figured out how to extract and release peptides.  And they aren't even claiming they've figured out how to release the peptides in a bioavailable manner in the human body.  Plus, whether those peptides actually do anything useful is speculative at this point, and not part of this research anyway.

So, no, they haven't "demonstrated" anything like what's being claimed.


Bingo. That's why I throw a friggin' fit when I see articles like this on Fark - the studies are just barely touching the surface of what might be possible, but the article's taken that football and run it through the goalposts of incredulity as it breathlessly extrapolates what they see as the upcoming reality based on those studies.

Pisses me off to no end, in part because this kind of breathless exaggeration undermines the actual work being done by the researchers, engineers, and scientists themselves. Friggin' "scientific reporting" at its worst.
 
2021-04-14 2:24:37 PM  
How about eat less and exercise? Eat less and exercise sound good to you?
 
2021-04-14 2:26:36 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


The substrate used was flour from the insect which was donated by the Salamanca-based company Tebrio

Hard pass
 
2021-04-14 2:45:58 PM  
What do you do? WHAT DO YOU DO?

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-04-14 2:53:02 PM  
You know what else cures diabetes?

Vampirism.

i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2021-04-14 6:09:15 PM  
I thought the answer would be amphetamines based on the headline.
 
2021-04-14 6:41:49 PM  
Considering how many bug parts we eat just in our normal food, this seems quaint in comparison.

/don't get me started on jelly beans
 
2021-04-14 6:55:21 PM  
just take my foot.
 
2021-04-14 9:12:17 PM  

mononymous: How about eat less and exercise? Eat less and exercise sound good to you?


No it does not sound good to me. Why on earth would it sound good? What freaking weirdo likes to eat less and exercise more? People might do for health reasons, but no (sane) person actually likes it.

....

I am perfectly okay with eating ground up bugs as long as I cannot tell that I am eating ground up bugs. If that flour tastes like normal flour, no problem. I assume ground up bugs already are in lots of foods I consume as it is. Just don't try and convince me to eat a cricket when I can clearly see it's a cricket.
 
2021-04-15 4:13:02 AM  

pearls before swine: Scientists from the Bioreactors Research Group (BIO-110) of the University of Granada (UGR) have demonstrated that a natural treatment based on flour made from the insect Tenebrio molitor (more commonly known as the mealworm) can help prevent Type II diabetes mellitus.

Have they?

The study carried out at the UGR focused on obtaining peptides with an antidiabetic capacity and involved optimizing the release of peptides contained in the protein of Tenebrio molitor by means of enzymatic processes.

So what they've actually done is figured out how to extract and release peptides.  And they aren't even claiming they've figured out how to release the peptides in a bioavailable manner in the human body.  Plus, whether those peptides actually do anything useful is speculative at this point, and not part of this research anyway.

So, no, they haven't "demonstrated" anything like what's being claimed.


Eat meal worms, keep feet.  The science is clear.
 
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