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(The Atlantic)   "Nature documentaries have never been more popular, in part because they offer easy escapism during a rough time, and in part because marijuana has been legalized in much of the United States"   (theatlantic.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, David Attenborough, Nature documentary, BBC Natural History Unit, The Blue Planet, Alastair Fothergill, new nature documentary, Perfect Planet, Planet Earth  
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305 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 12 Apr 2021 at 11:44 PM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



24 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-04-12 9:46:10 PM  
You know what? I'm just going to go on enjoying them anyway.
 
2021-04-12 10:15:21 PM  
A botanical expedition, you say?
encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.comView Full Size
 
2021-04-13 12:10:43 AM  
Oh, it is plenty really.  Like that time you let your 4 year old watch the Nature episode about moose and right at the end a pack of wolves murders the host's favorite baby moose and they show him crying as he digs through the carcass.

/Like that other time you figure the moose thing was a fluke and you let him watch the artic wolf one only to have the old grandma wolf starve to death as the gives all of the food to the pups.
//I think right after that a pair of marauding wolves came in and murdered the pups
///Now we stick to Planet Earth
 
2021-04-13 12:14:25 AM  

edmo: You know what? I'm just going to go on enjoying them anyway.


...on weed?
 
2021-04-13 12:23:20 AM  
In part because so many people have finished consuming large chunks of the internet and are bored and looking for more.
 
2021-04-13 12:32:16 AM  
Or is it a manner of pre-nostalgia? We know we are destroying what remains of nature. Watching documentaries of what you're losing is a bit like sitting at a loved one's side as they die. They aren't gone yet, but you know it'll be soon.
 
2021-04-13 12:41:53 AM  
I'd say because they are more readily available , god knows we finally get to see them instead of ice road trucking ancient alien pawn stars.

Me? I've been missing those old Disney nature documentaries with Fess Parker

"Ole Mama Possum is in for a big surprise when she sees the mischief her little ones just got into"
 
2021-04-13 12:51:27 AM  

kyleaugustus: Or is it a manner of pre-nostalgia? We know we are destroying what remains of nature. Watching documentaries of what you're losing is a bit like sitting at a loved one's side as they die. They aren't gone yet, but you know it'll be soon.


And affluent people all own big-ass TVs now.  A good nature documentary on a bling television is the rough equivalent of gunning the engine of a recreational vehicle.
 
2021-04-13 12:53:17 AM  
The Larch
Youtube mBcTXBhYzfM
 
2021-04-13 12:57:03 AM  
I don't love how animals are treated in captivity as it relates to our consumption. I genuinely do wish we treated them with more dignity than cramming a whole bunch of pigs, cows, etc into slaughterhouses.

That said, vegans will almost always point to those conditions as to why they picked their diet. I almost always show them nature documentaries to show them that reality ain't much better than slaughterhouses.
 
2021-04-13 1:41:04 AM  

RogermcAllen: Oh, it is plenty really.  Like that time you let your 4 year old watch the Nature episode about moose and right at the end a pack of wolves murders the host's favorite baby moose and they show him crying as he digs through the carcass.

/Like that other time you figure the moose thing was a fluke and you let him watch the artic wolf one only to have the old grandma wolf starve to death as the gives all of the food to the pups.
//I think right after that a pair of marauding wolves came in and murdered the pups
///Now we stick to Planet Earth


Hey now. One of the earliest TV shows I can remember watching was David Attemborough's Trials of Life, where I got to see a pack of hyenas tear apart an antelope limb from limb, with one hyena ripping the head off a full grown antelope and running away with it. I was around 4 years old. It didn't scar or traumatized me, in fact it helped me understand the world better: there exists predators and prey, animals are for eating, death can be violent, vegetarians go against nature.

Your kid is just a pussy.
 
2021-04-13 2:08:08 AM  

RogermcAllen: Oh, it is plenty really.  Like that time you let your 4 year old watch the Nature episode about moose and right at the end a pack of wolves murders the host's favorite baby moose and they show him crying as he digs through the carcass.


They actually have gotten worse endings.  I was watching one about lions with my 7 year old niece.  In the end, the whole pride was poisoned to death by farmers.
 
2021-04-13 2:29:31 AM  
pics.me.meView Full Size
 
2021-04-13 2:32:48 AM  

Straight Outta Wells Branch: I don't love how animals are treated in captivity as it relates to our consumption. I genuinely do wish we treated them with more dignity than cramming a whole bunch of pigs, cows, etc into slaughterhouses.

That said, vegans will almost always point to those conditions as to why they picked their diet. I almost always show them nature documentaries to show them that reality ain't much better than slaughterhouses.


There are 25 billion chickens in the world. They exist because of us and for two reasons. There are very few feral chickens; we breed chickens, they didn't win natural selection, except in a kinda farked up sense. Second, we domesticated them. They're not what they are genetically without our intervention. So chickens basically don't exist in nature outside the context of human action.

But of course chickens do exist in nature. That's because humans are natural; we come from the natural world and it's what we live in and what we are.

So our action creating a species in order to constantly slaughter it is worth a moral look. Sure, you could say the antelope only exists to feed the lion, and the lion doesn't give a fark about a merciful kill; but at least the antelope got to run around for a little while, unlike factory-farmed animals. And, yeah, that's why I have no problem with hunting.

So, yeah, we do the same farked up things as we see in other parts of nature, but we do them at an industrial scale. That seems a different moral question than should the lion do farked up shiat to the antelope.

But the lion pretty much has to eat meal; there can be no vegan lions. That's just how they roll. Humans can survive on more diverse diets. We can survive mostly on meat or entirely on veggies and fruit or some mix thereof.

So we have the choice not to eat meat. Even if we decide there are no moral problems with breeding a species just to kill it, it is still far more sustainable for us to eat a mostly vegetable diet than a meat-based diet.  The environmental cost of meat is too high. Now, that doesn't require veganism per se; vegetarianism would be fine, and that means you can havr milk and eggs and support a chicken that isn't just born to be slaughtered. What I'm trying to say is that I'm really farking stoned.
 
2021-04-13 4:33:02 AM  

AliceBToklasLives: Straight Outta Wells Branch: I don't love how animals are treated in captivity as it relates to our consumption. I genuinely do wish we treated them with more dignity than cramming a whole bunch of pigs, cows, etc into slaughterhouses.

That said, vegans will almost always point to those conditions as to why they picked their diet. I almost always show them nature documentaries to show them that reality ain't much better than slaughterhouses.

There are 25 billion chickens in the world. They exist because of us and for two reasons. There are very few feral chickens; we breed chickens, they didn't win natural selection, except in a kinda farked up sense. Second, we domesticated them. They're not what they are genetically without our intervention. So chickens basically don't exist in nature outside the context of human action.

But of course chickens do exist in nature. That's because humans are natural; we come from the natural world and it's what we live in and what we are.

So our action creating a species in order to constantly slaughter it is worth a moral look. Sure, you could say the antelope only exists to feed the lion, and the lion doesn't give a fark about a merciful kill; but at least the antelope got to run around for a little while, unlike factory-farmed animals. And, yeah, that's why I have no problem with hunting.

So, yeah, we do the same farked up things as we see in other parts of nature, but we do them at an industrial scale. That seems a different moral question than should the lion do farked up shiat to the antelope.

But the lion pretty much has to eat meal; there can be no vegan lions. That's just how they roll. Humans can survive on more diverse diets. We can survive mostly on meat or entirely on veggies and fruit or some mix thereof.

So we have the choice not to eat meat. Even if we decide there are no moral problems with breeding a species just to kill it, it is still far more sustainable for us to eat a mostly vegetable diet than a meat-based diet.  The environmental cost of meat is too high. Now, that doesn't require veganism per se; vegetarianism would be fine, and that means you can havr milk and eggs and support a chicken that isn't just born to be slaughtered. What I'm trying to say is that I'm really farking stoned.


That does it. You've convinced me.

I need weed too.

And then I'm making loco moco with a meatless patty
 
2021-04-13 5:19:48 AM  
Watch My Octopus Teacher on Netflix.  It's excellent.
 
2021-04-13 5:21:32 AM  
A few puffs, Pink Floyd Echoes and an undersea documentary will set you right. It works on kids with no weed too. The music is as fluid as the water.
 
2021-04-13 8:28:23 AM  
My favorite of zefrank's nature videos

True Facts About Morgan Freeman
Youtube Ch5MEJk5ZCQ
 
2021-04-13 8:57:51 AM  

foo monkey: Watch My Octopus Teacher on Netflix.  It's excellent.


I watched it while high, and was convinced that it was the greatest love story ever told.

Either that, or was it a cautionary tale for young women everywhere: This splendid creature was a hunter, she was intelligent, she was a badass, and she had a wonderful life, frolicking with fish and a handsome human. Until some male octopus knocked her up, and drained her of her will to live
 
2021-04-13 1:51:30 PM  
It's popular, because for the vast majority watching, it doesn't exist anymore where they live.
 
2021-04-13 2:24:27 PM  
I call total bullshat on this

"Nature documentaries have never been more popular, in part because they offer easy escapism during a rough time~"

No the fook they do not. you can;t find a modern nature docu that;s not going to piss in your ear about the terrible destruction and ruin the environment faces and who al the neat creates they are showing you will be dead and gone soon.

the fook there i no escapism to be found in nature docus unless you're watching so some old ass chit from more than about 15 years ago at least.
 
2021-04-13 3:12:00 PM  

RogermcAllen: Oh, it is plenty really.  Like that time you let your 4 year old watch the Nature episode about moose and right at the end a pack of wolves murders the host's favorite baby moose and they show him crying as he digs through the carcass.

/Like that other time you figure the moose thing was a fluke and you let him watch the artic wolf one only to have the old grandma wolf starve to death as the gives all of the food to the pups.
//I think right after that a pair of marauding wolves came in and murdered the pups
///Now we stick to Planet Earth


Was it the fox or cheetah that had to eat their own cubs?

/fark Nature
//Though the weasel episode was amazing
 
2021-04-13 3:19:06 PM  

See My Az Go: foo monkey: Watch My Octopus Teacher on Netflix.  It's excellent.

I watched it while high, and was convinced that it was the greatest love story ever told.

Either that, or was it a cautionary tale for young women everywhere: This splendid creature was a hunter, she was intelligent, she was a badass, and she had a wonderful life, frolicking with fish and a handsome human. Until some male octopus knocked her up, and drained her of her will to live


I got that out of the film and I watched it stone cold sober.

/IUDs are a sound investment ladies.
 
2021-04-13 5:00:33 PM  

PvtStash: I call total bullshat on this

"Nature documentaries have never been more popular, in part because they offer easy escapism during a rough time~"

No the fook they do not. you can;t find a modern nature docu that;s not going to piss in your ear about the terrible destruction and ruin the environment faces and who al the neat creates they are showing you will be dead and gone soon.

the fook there i no escapism to be found in nature docus unless you're watching so some old ass chit from more than about 15 years ago at least.


15 years ago? I remember hearing about climate change at least 30 years ago, and I sure as fark remember the crying Indian 45 years ago, when I was wee. People my age can't say we were not warned. Anyway, plenty of docs last century made the kinds of statements you describe, but it probably has become ubiquitous as things get more dire. So, yeah, not much escapism.
 
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