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(Science Daily)   Recreational runners have an almost 50% of incurring a major injury and once you do, the odds of a repeat increase. The only decision is to STOP RUNNING NOW, YOU FOOLS   (sciencedaily.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Tendon, Injury, Achilles tendon, Physical trauma, half of all recreational runners, Tendons, Doctoral student Jonatan Jungmalm, Human anatomy  
•       •       •

429 clicks; posted to STEM » and Sports » on 12 Apr 2021 at 4:05 PM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-04-12 1:03:55 PM  
 if you don't go to physical therapy after an injury, you're gonna have a bad time.
 
2021-04-12 1:06:14 PM  
Oh eM Gee!

That makes me glad I stopped running before I got fat !
 
2021-04-12 1:09:47 PM  
i1.wp.comView Full Size
 
2021-04-12 1:12:13 PM  
As I've gotten older I've found that my best approach to running is

1) Don't run on consecutive days (cross training the off days is fine)
2) If I have even the slightest pain on a run, the next running session is cancelled and all cardio reverts to Z2 and maybe Z3 biking until I am 100% better

It kind of sucks to have to scrub a long run but I also enjoy not being injured.
 
2021-04-12 1:14:36 PM  
I can attest to this. I used to run many miles per week.
Developed the artheritus & discovered I'm allergic to anti-inflammatory meds.
Kinda f**ked right up now & have been told by the doctor that mobility-scooters are in my future.
 
2021-04-12 1:20:40 PM  
I used to run with the dog but stopped in my mid-30s after something happened with my knee while running, and I had to walk with crutches and then a cane for like 3 weeks. Probably bursitis-related, as an MRI did not show any torn meniscus or anything like that.

Still have a trick knee but at least I can still hike.
 
2021-04-12 1:23:15 PM  
Physical activity increases chances of injury, opposed to tubs who never move. Film at 11
 
2021-04-12 1:29:21 PM  

NateAsbestos: Physical activity increases chances of injury, opposed to tubs who never move. Film at 11


Hey, you trying mutate my joke?  That's OK, I like mutations.
 
2021-04-12 1:36:58 PM  
images-na.ssl-images-amazon.comView Full Size
 
2021-04-12 1:37:27 PM  

OptionC: As I've gotten older I've found that my best approach to running is

1) Don't run on consecutive days (cross training the off days is fine)
2) If I have even the slightest pain on a run, the next running session is cancelled and all cardio reverts to Z2 and maybe Z3 biking until I am 100% better

It kind of sucks to have to scrub a long run but I also enjoy not being injured.


I'd really like to get back into running - both for fun and fitness.  But it's been decades (that I spent with my former hobby alcoholism) and I'm about 50 lbs over ideal weight.  So I know that getting back into running shape will be difficult and potentially fraught with pain and potential for injury.

With spring arrived, I've started with walking a circuit of our acreage.  It's about 1700 feet around the circumference and a delta of about 20 ft elevation from end-to-end, so it can be a good, low impact walk-about.  It's sad to be in a place in life where walking around the "yard" is my regimen, but here I am.
 
2021-04-12 1:46:28 PM  

SpectroBoy: [i1.wp.com image 300x163]


Here for this.
Leaving happy.
 
2021-04-12 2:25:59 PM  
Former recreational runner. Qualified for and ran a few Boston Marathons and lots of other ones. No major injuries, Partly lucky. Partly not stupid about it. Old enough now I'm content to rest on my laurels.
 
2021-04-12 3:31:24 PM  

OptionC: As I've gotten older I've found that my best approach to running is

1) Don't run on consecutive days (cross training the off days is fine)
2) If I have even the slightest pain on a run, the next running session is cancelled and all cardio reverts to Z2 and maybe Z3 biking until I am 100% better

It kind of sucks to have to scrub a long run but I also enjoy not being injured.


I can't agree more with what you said.  Early in my running "career" I would get serious injuries frequently because I didn't recognize the early indicators.  Rarely do you just incur an injury out of the blue unless you fall or twist something.  You can usually feel it building up over days.

Like you, when I feel that coming on I ease up and go slower, find a different exercise, or shut it down completely for a couple days.  Beats not being able to do anything for weeks on end trying to come back from serious injury.

Older = Smarter

/and slower
 
2021-04-12 4:07:59 PM  
You can't deny it.  Jogging is big business.
 
2021-04-12 4:09:19 PM  
I know more than a handful of former runners that now bicycle because it's far easier on the joints.

Of course, a co-worker seriously messed up his knee (two ligament tears) in a bike crash because he couldn't unclip his cleats before landing very, very awkwardly.
 
2021-04-12 4:10:19 PM  
Subby: chance


Had to, he left out an entire word.

Rules you know
 
2021-04-12 4:11:35 PM  

OptionC: As I've gotten older I've found that my best approach to running is

1) Don't run on consecutive days (cross training the off days is fine)
2) If I have even the slightest pain on a run, the next running session is cancelled and all cardio reverts to Z2 and maybe Z3 biking until I am 100% better

It kind of sucks to have to scrub a long run but I also enjoy not being injured.


I wouldnt run more than 3 days a week if i were you.
 
2021-04-12 4:13:36 PM  

NateAsbestos: Physical activity increases chances of injury, opposed to tubs who never move. Film at 11


Exercise also strengthens immune system and lessens possibility of death from covid
 
2021-04-12 4:13:37 PM  
Still can't figure out how glutes engage in a natural stride, and my quads tendons are going to be biatching until I do.
 
2021-04-12 4:15:16 PM  
Stationary bikes good for knees.

Can watch the boob toob too.
 
2021-04-12 4:16:33 PM  
Yup.  I ran as a kid, my best mile was I think 4:42.  Sub 5 and I think sub 4:45.  Ran recreationally in the Navy, wife (who ran NCAA Div. 1 as a walk-on) and I used to do tons of 10Ks, 5ks, and one marathon and one half together.  My running days are over.

I'm in OK shape but, I used to a half marathon annually, this huge race in Phoenix. in 2017 I really farked up my knee on the race.  I finished in terrible pain and knew something was wrong. I looked down and was like, "uh.....this is NOT good."  it was swollen as hell and wasn't right for several months.  I should have gotten it looked at but I just rode it out.

I still run from time to time but mainly just walk.  I did a 4mi race last year and it just wore my ass out. Wife is starting to feel the miles too; we sometimes just do yoga workouts / long walks / weight resistance.  she's a physical therapist so she knows all these cool tricks and shiat and has all the gadgets for non-impact exercise.
 
2021-04-12 4:16:50 PM  
TFA: Of those hit by injury, half had problems with their knees, calves or Achilles tendons.
"Few of the injuries were long-lasting. But all the injuries prevented the runners from exercising as usual," says Jonatan.


I've been having soreness that qualify here as long as I have been running.  In my older age, the Achilles tendon is the worst but rarely bad enough to halt running for any notable length of time.  Muscle recovery is longer, of course, an I've blown a calf muscle or two but it has been a while - that's a week to two-week recovery.


TFA: Those who had relatively weak outer thighs faced a higher risk of injury.

This is certainly the case.  I turn 50 this year and do a pretty fast 5K (for age) most days of the week, on concrete and have exceptionally strong thighs.  I've injured the meniscus in both knees (one twice and unrelated to running) and never had surgery - one injury required a leg brace for weeks.  They don't bother me.


Those with late pronation in their running gait were also at higher risk.

A good shoe makes a difference.  Note that even at the running stores they may not fit you correctly as your issue *could* happen only while you run (the vast majority of the time, a running store is going to fit you well).  If you do have a decent shoe and still get splints or problems with the planar tendon, slow your run to a fast jog (if not already) and land with less heel or more of a flat foot and see if the problem goes away.  If it does, you need to switch shoes.

Oh, and don't wear the shoe too long.  I probably had 800+ miles on this last set that I finally replaced last week (Nimbus 23...like running on air).
 
2021-04-12 4:33:06 PM  

GoldSpider: Still can't figure out how glutes engage in a natural stride, and my quads tendons are going to be biatching until I do.


Open your stride.  But to do that you have to be going faster than a jog.  If you're haven't progressed in your daily run/jog, it may not happen.  If you are progressing, one day your stride will just open up (ymmv by age/general health/etc.).

One good way is to do "over-strides".  When you see or hear people at the track "running the straights and walking the curves", typically this is done either sprinting or over-striding.  With overstriding, you just stretch your stride out while doing it relatively quickly...but not sprinting.  Doing that will see your feet landing where they are supposed to.  Doing this on the track straightaway is a good technique if you can't see yourself opening your stride for several laps/miles.

CSB: When I was young, not working your glutes during practice led to many-a-instance of ass-lock (not with myself mind you).  Usually it is 200m-400m runners similarly distanced hurdlers with this problem.  They work sprints only then go out and run their race and the next thing you know, they're grabbing their ass/side-back of leg and hurry-hobbling off the track looking for a place to land.
 
2021-04-12 4:39:20 PM  

UberDave: They work sprints only then go out and run their race and the next thing you know, they're grabbing their ass/side-back of leg and hurry-hobbling off the track looking for a place to land.


We called that rigor mortis.  I used to get that a lot.  Then I quit running :)
 
2021-04-12 4:43:27 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-04-12 4:45:48 PM  

OptionC: As I've gotten older I've found that my best approach to running is

1) Don't run on consecutive days (cross training the off days is fine)
2) If I have even the slightest pain on a run, the next running session is cancelled and all cardio reverts to Z2 and maybe Z3 biking until I am 100% better

It kind of sucks to have to scrub a long run but I also enjoy not being injured.\


Point #1 is the answer for me. I run every other day, and do yoga and some core stuff (pull-ups, dips, push-ups) on the off days. I've been training for 13.1 at the end of this month, so I've really upped my miles, still no issues as long as I leave a day between runs.
 
2021-04-12 4:54:30 PM  
I ran in a marathon and never will again.
 
2021-04-12 4:55:39 PM  

UberDave: GoldSpider: Still can't figure out how glutes engage in a natural stride, and my quads tendons are going to be biatching until I do.

Open your stride.  But to do that you have to be going faster than a jog.  If you're haven't progressed in your daily run/jog, it may not happen.  If you are progressing, one day your stride will just open up (ymmv by age/general health/etc.).

One good way is to do "over-strides".  When you see or hear people at the track "running the straights and walking the curves", typically this is done either sprinting or over-striding.  With overstriding, you just stretch your stride out while doing it relatively quickly...but not sprinting.  Doing that will see your feet landing where they are supposed to.  Doing this on the track straightaway is a good technique if you can't see yourself opening your stride for several laps/miles.


Part of my PT is shortening up my stride so my heels don't land in front of my knees.  So far at anything less than a fairly strenuous pace, this feels like I'm marching quickly and not running, and doesn't seem efficient at all.  Almost any glute engagement is intentional, but does not feel like it is assisting with my stride at all.  Once my most recent quad tendon flare-up settles down I'll give those overstrides a try.
 
2021-04-12 5:03:11 PM  
Had an example of this when I lived in Sunnyvale, CA.  Guy would be out running while I was walking my greyhounds.  Then I didn't see him for a while.  He comes back, running with a knee brace.  Second interval. Second knee brace, more running.  Third interval. Walking with a cane.
 
2021-04-12 5:06:04 PM  

GoldSpider: UberDave: GoldSpider: Still can't figure out how glutes engage in a natural stride, and my quads tendons are going to be biatching until I do.

Open your stride.  But to do that you have to be going faster than a jog.  If you're haven't progressed in your daily run/jog, it may not happen.  If you are progressing, one day your stride will just open up (ymmv by age/general health/etc.).

One good way is to do "over-strides".  When you see or hear people at the track "running the straights and walking the curves", typically this is done either sprinting or over-striding.  With overstriding, you just stretch your stride out while doing it relatively quickly...but not sprinting.  Doing that will see your feet landing where they are supposed to.  Doing this on the track straightaway is a good technique if you can't see yourself opening your stride for several laps/miles.

Part of my PT is shortening up my stride so my heels don't land in front of my knees.  So far at anything less than a fairly strenuous pace, this feels like I'm marching quickly and not running, and doesn't seem efficient at all.  Almost any glute engagement is intentional, but does not feel like it is assisting with my stride at all.  Once my most recent quad tendon flare-up settles down I'll give those overstrides a try.


Farking ouch.
 
2021-04-12 5:21:31 PM  
I have learned to get myself only running every other day, though because my work schedule is always shifting that can always throw a wrench in the plans.

I'm paranoid about the ice so if there was even a bit of it out there I didn't go during the winter, I'll have to figure something out because that can't happen again. Only the odd maintenance run once every two weeks just isn't going to cut it.

Did five miles easily the other week and then six miles the next time out, just to see how they felt and they were no problem at all. I could have gone for more but I'm wary about pushing too hard again too soon, though that is more of a previous heat exhaustion issue than an endurance one. I thought I'd lose a lot more over the winter than I did so I'm pretty happy overall.

Still wouldn't mind getting a Strava group going, just for that extra level of motivation on days I don't feel like it.

Autoerotic Defenestration: [Fark user image 600x435]


PT test in three degrees or negative three degrees in shorts and a t-shirt, baby!

I always run in shorts unless it is down in the single digits.
 
2021-04-12 5:32:30 PM  
Gave up running about 15 years ago due to pain I developed in my left hip.  Doctor said if I had kept it up I would be a hip replacement candidate by now.

Running isn't for everyone.  Pay attention to your body.
 
2021-04-12 5:33:20 PM  

make me some tea: I used to run with the dog but stopped in my mid-30s after something happened with my knee while running, and I had to walk with crutches and then a cane for like 3 weeks. Probably bursitis-related, as an MRI did not show any torn meniscus or anything like that.

Still have a trick knee but at least I can still hike.


I've never been able to run on pavement... just hurts the knees too much.  Hiking is on softer ground, so it doesn't hurt.

/As I live in a state that gets snow, hiking on fresh snow is really fun too.  Even more cushion.
//Global warming is ruining that though.  Haven't been able to go on a sufficient snow hike in years
 
2021-04-12 5:34:38 PM  

GoldSpider: UberDave: GoldSpider: Still can't figure out how glutes engage in a natural stride, and my quads tendons are going to be biatching until I do.

Open your stride.  But to do that you have to be going faster than a jog.  If you're haven't progressed in your daily run/jog, it may not happen.  If you are progressing, one day your stride will just open up (ymmv by age/general health/etc.).

One good way is to do "over-strides".  When you see or hear people at the track "running the straights and walking the curves", typically this is done either sprinting or over-striding.  With overstriding, you just stretch your stride out while doing it relatively quickly...but not sprinting.  Doing that will see your feet landing where they are supposed to.  Doing this on the track straightaway is a good technique if you can't see yourself opening your stride for several laps/miles.

Part of my PT is shortening up my stride so my heels don't land in front of my knees.  So far at anything less than a fairly strenuous pace, this feels like I'm marching quickly and not running, and doesn't seem efficient at all.  Almost any glute engagement is intentional, but does not feel like it is assisting with my stride at all.  Once my most recent quad tendon flare-up settles down I'll give those overstrides a try.


I am almost 50, was a 400m runner in HS, and converted to distance running in middle age.  Seven marathons so far and an ultra this year hopefully.

I found that getting a midfoot strike with quick cadence was the key to long distance speed.  Ideally that cadence is 180 steps/minute.  I usually can only get about in the low 170s though.

Try it with a metronome app on your phone.  It does feel like you are marching in place but you will go much faster with better form.

As for glutes:  I got away from flat out sprinting on the track to engage them.  Instead I run at a quick pace up hills.   Takes away the pounding and reduces injury.

I wish you all the best in your running adventures.
 
2021-04-12 5:38:03 PM  

WoodyHayes: I have learned to get myself only running every other day, though because my work schedule is always shifting that can always throw a wrench in the plans.

I'm paranoid about the ice so if there was even a bit of it out there I didn't go during the winter, I'll have to figure something out because that can't happen again. Only the odd maintenance run once every two weeks just isn't going to cut it.

Did five miles easily the other week and then six miles the next time out, just to see how they felt and they were no problem at all. I could have gone for more but I'm wary about pushing too hard again too soon, though that is more of a previous heat exhaustion issue than an endurance one. I thought I'd lose a lot more over the winter than I did so I'm pretty happy overall.

Still wouldn't mind getting a Strava group going, just for that extra level of motivation on days I don't feel like it.

Autoerotic Defenestration: [Fark user image 600x435]

PT test in three degrees or negative three degrees in shorts and a t-shirt, baby!

I always run in shorts unless it is down in the single digits.


I hate ice as well.  When it is very icy I run laps around The Big House.  As you know it is embedded in the ground and built into a hillside.  The university salts the sidewalk and parking lot immediately so I get a nice one mile hilly loop to run on.
 
2021-04-12 5:43:03 PM  

Ty Webb: OptionC: As I've gotten older I've found that my best approach to running is

1) Don't run on consecutive days (cross training the off days is fine)
2) If I have even the slightest pain on a run, the next running session is cancelled and all cardio reverts to Z2 and maybe Z3 biking until I am 100% better

It kind of sucks to have to scrub a long run but I also enjoy not being injured.\

Point #1 is the answer for me. I run every other day, and do yoga and some core stuff (pull-ups, dips, push-ups) on the off days. I've been training for 13.1 at the end of this month, so I've really upped my miles, still no issues as long as I leave a day between runs.


+1 on the yoga. Had some issues related to my mid / lower back affecting my glutes and legs, but the yoga routines (or at least the stretching of the affected areas) really helped put it away. I can get away with running 2x a day but generally I prefer to follow on the space it out routine. 20-30 minutes on the elliptical at a high resistance burns just as many and is almost completely non impact.
 
2021-04-12 6:17:28 PM  
I swim and ride mt bikes, both of which I enjoy.  I do not enjoy running... mainly because I run like a duck.
Plus it hurts my knees, shins and hips.
 
2021-04-12 6:38:34 PM  
I had a minor knee injury when I was 19.  No actual structural damage, but in the investigation of what was causing the pain they informed me that while I had healthy cartilage, it was not particularly plentiful and to be careful with it.
 
2021-04-12 7:17:44 PM  
I'm going to keep running 35 miles a week, thanks tho
 
2021-04-12 7:18:15 PM  

The Googles Do Nothing: I hate ice as well.  When it is very icy I run laps around The Big House.  As you know it is embedded in the ground and built into a hillside.  The university salts the sidewalk and parking lot immediately so I get a nice one mile hilly loop to run on.


You're a better man than I am, Gunga Din.

Loops I absolutely cannot do and it is all mental, like most things in life.
 
2021-04-12 8:09:32 PM  
ya if there is pool access somewhere switching to that is the answer.
 
2021-04-12 8:29:35 PM  

NateAsbestos: Physical activity increases chances of injury, opposed to tubs who never move. Film at 11


Hey, us fatties still get leg cramps and bed sores
 
2021-04-12 8:40:30 PM  

The Googles Do Nothing: I am almost 50, was a 400m runner in HS, and converted to distance running in middle age.  Seven marathons so far and an ultra this year hopefully.


41, miler in high school, picked up the bug again in my 30s and have 5 marathons under my belt.

I did run with a metronome app before but may be time to try it again.  I've started getting used to it, and the idea that to go faster you just pick your knees up higher instead of lengthening your stride.  I just have to practice it more without doing stupid shiat like trying the zero-drop shoes that started this all to begin with, thinking I had the problem fixed.
 
2021-04-12 8:48:00 PM  

Fano: I'm going to keep running 35 miles a week, thanks tho


Doc told me no running at my age, because joints.  So I walk the 35 miles instead.

Carrying a 50 lb MOLLE pack.

Did my 5 miles today, despite still being sore as hell from climbing a mountain on Saturday.  With the pack.
 
2021-04-12 9:05:00 PM  
I joined Runners Anonymous years ago.  Whenever I get the urge to run, I call up a member and they come over with a six-pack of beer and talk me out of it.
 
2021-04-12 9:29:42 PM  
dittybopper

Carrying a 50 lb MOLLE pack.

Did my 5 miles today, despite still being sore as hell from climbing a mountain on Saturday.  With the pack.


Why? I don't own a pack over 30 litres anymore. My ski touring pack is under 15 lbs these days. Light and fast is the way to go. If you insist on the massive pack get some ski poles, my knees hurt just thinking about that.....
 
2021-04-12 10:41:20 PM  

SpockYouOut: if you don't go to physical therapy after an injury, you're gonna have a bad time.


Saved me a couple times now
 
2021-04-12 10:43:25 PM  

SansNeural: OptionC: As I've gotten older I've found that my best approach to running is

1) Don't run on consecutive days (cross training the off days is fine)
2) If I have even the slightest pain on a run, the next running session is cancelled and all cardio reverts to Z2 and maybe Z3 biking until I am 100% better

It kind of sucks to have to scrub a long run but I also enjoy not being injured.

I'd really like to get back into running - both for fun and fitness.  But it's been decades (that I spent with my former hobby alcoholism) and I'm about 50 lbs over ideal weight.  So I know that getting back into running shape will be difficult and potentially fraught with pain and potential for injury.

With spring arrived, I've started with walking a circuit of our acreage.  It's about 1700 feet around the circumference and a delta of about 20 ft elevation from end-to-end, so it can be a good, low impact walk-about.  It's sad to be in a place in life where walking around the "yard" is my regimen, but here I am.


It's a start.   Keep it up and you may not be running but the 50 lbs can certainly dwindle away.   Good on ya!!
 
2021-04-12 10:45:53 PM  

WoodyHayes: The Googles Do Nothing: I hate ice as well.  When it is very icy I run laps around The Big House.  As you know it is embedded in the ground and built into a hillside.  The university salts the sidewalk and parking lot immediately so I get a nice one mile hilly loop to run on.

You're a better man than I am, Gunga Din.

Loops I absolutely cannot do and it is all mental, like most things in life.


Well, I didn't say I LIKED it.  Nobody likes loops.  But when a run must be done it beats not running.  Plus I can bask in the long ago glory of college football which has foresaken us for 20 years.
 
2021-04-12 10:48:08 PM  

GoldSpider: The Googles Do Nothing: I am almost 50, was a 400m runner in HS, and converted to distance running in middle age.  Seven marathons so far and an ultra this year hopefully.

41, miler in high school, picked up the bug again in my 30s and have 5 marathons under my belt.

I did run with a metronome app before but may be time to try it again.  I've started getting used to it, and the idea that to go faster you just pick your knees up higher instead of lengthening your stride.  I just have to practice it more without doing stupid shiat like trying the zero-drop shoes that started this all to begin with, thinking I had the problem fixed.


My journey also included zero drop shoes.  I contracted plantar fasciitis from them after a very hard 10K race.  I have settled on 4mm-8mm drops as my comfort zone.
 
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