Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Marketwatch)   Electric, autonomous cars - this is the Huawei   (marketwatch.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Automobile, Huawei executives, Apple Inc., electric cars, Huawei, Chinese auto makers, Automobile industry in China, Technology  
•       •       •

255 clicks; posted to Business » on 12 Apr 2021 at 12:46 PM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



8 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-04-12 12:21:16 PM  
FTFA: Huawei executives said at an event in China that the telecom's autonomous-driving technology has already surpassed Tesla Inc.'s

Without getting into analysis of the plausibility of their claim or the likelihood of IP theft.... Telecommunication and "internet" companies have ZERO business building code for safety critical applications. Huawei, Google, Apple and Uber have very talented people that are willing to "give it a shot". They should not be trusted with this task.
 
2021-04-12 12:30:01 PM  

b2theory: FTFA: Huawei executives said at an event in China that the telecom's autonomous-driving technology has already surpassed Tesla Inc.'s

Without getting into analysis of the plausibility of their claim or the likelihood of IP theft.... Telecommunication and "internet" companies have ZERO business building code for safety critical applications. Huawei, Google, Apple and Uber have very talented people that are willing to "give it a shot". They should not be trusted with this task.


An example of what I mean:

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-ub​e​r-crash/uber-disabled-emergency-brakin​g-in-self-driving-car-u-s-agency-idUSK​CN1IP26K?il=0
 
2021-04-12 2:06:21 PM  
They'll have a heckuva market in China to work with. Possibly in a few other places as well. It may be a hard sell in Western countries.

Really, though, China has an enormous population of people who don't own cars. They could do quite well serving their home market.
 
2021-04-12 2:12:41 PM  

b2theory: FTFA: Huawei executives said at an event in China that the telecom's autonomous-driving technology has already surpassed Tesla Inc.'s

Without getting into analysis of the plausibility of their claim or the likelihood of IP theft.... Telecommunication and "internet" companies have ZERO business building code for safety critical applications. Huawei, Google, Apple and Uber have very talented people that are willing to "give it a shot". They should not be trusted with this task.


911 seeing weeping in a corner.

The old Bell system landlines and related software probably qualified for "safety critical applications".  I also remember having to use Bell MTBF (mean time between failure) calculations to appraise military devices chances for failure.  Granted, Bell was a regulated monopoly, so in effect everything they did was "cost plus" (if they increased costs for a good reason, they jacked up the price).  Increasing reliability was often a great way to increase both costs and prices.

All that was thrown out with the rise of the internet and packet switching, and the breakup of Ma Bell (which was always a great idea.  Having AT&T (formerly Bell South) put it back together is not).  It works, until it doesn't.  And that is where these jokers are coming from.

On the other hand, Boeing used to be the example of how to right correct code.  Used to be.  And the code is likely correct (as in exactly fits the spec).  The assumptions about the flight model are probably what was broken.
 
2021-04-12 2:21:16 PM  

yet_another_wumpus: b2theory: FTFA: Huawei executives said at an event in China that the telecom's autonomous-driving technology has already surpassed Tesla Inc.'s

Without getting into analysis of the plausibility of their claim or the likelihood of IP theft.... Telecommunication and "internet" companies have ZERO business building code for safety critical applications. Huawei, Google, Apple and Uber have very talented people that are willing to "give it a shot". They should not be trusted with this task.

911 seeing weeping in a corner.

The old Bell system landlines and related software probably qualified for "safety critical applications".  I also remember having to use Bell MTBF (mean time between failure) calculations to appraise military devices chances for failure.  Granted, Bell was a regulated monopoly, so in effect everything they did was "cost plus" (if they increased costs for a good reason, they jacked up the price).  Increasing reliability was often a great way to increase both costs and prices.

All that was thrown out with the rise of the internet and packet switching, and the breakup of Ma Bell (which was always a great idea.  Having AT&T (formerly Bell South) put it back together is not).  It works, until it doesn't.  And that is where these jokers are coming from.

On the other hand, Boeing used to be the example of how to right correct code.  Used to be.  And the code is likely correct (as in exactly fits the spec).  The assumptions about the flight model are probably what was broken.


I'm sorry. The reliability of "911" is way too low for safety critical applications.

With respect to Boeing, even when you follow good process you can have edge cases that result in death. What you don't have is a single engineer deciding that the emergency breaking system is "erratic" and then disabling it.
 
2021-04-12 2:51:56 PM  

beezeltown: They'll have a heckuva market in China to work with. Possibly in a few other places as well. It may be a hard sell in Western countries.

Really, though, China has an enormous population of people who don't own cars. They could do quite well serving their home market.


Telsa just opened a gigafactory in Shanghai.  I'm sure they're keeping a tight lid on all their secrets.

/snort
 
2021-04-12 2:53:59 PM  

b2theory: With respect to Boeing, even when you follow good process you can have edge cases that result in death. What you don't have is a single engineer deciding that the emergency breaking system is "erratic" and then disabling it.


China tends to treat its vast population the way a factory manager would treat their raw materials.  You have to break a few eggs to make fried rice.  Their DOT is not the same DOT as we have here.

I'm sure it'll be fine.  It's fine.  And if it's not, let's hope there's video.
 
2021-04-12 10:25:18 PM  
well i know huawei was pushing some remote mining system a few years back (basically driving mining equipment from the office/home. and they had a few mines already using the system. as for fully automated idk but all those remote operated sites must have given them a crap load of data to work with.
 
Displayed 8 of 8 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.