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(Twitter)   On the 60th anniversary of Gagarin's historic space flight, we speak to the woman whose potato field he landed in   (twitter.com) divider line
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1532 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Apr 2021 at 10:05 AM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-04-12 4:25:58 AM  
Original Tweet:

 
2021-04-12 9:18:47 AM  
I bet *this* would have really scared the crap out of her:

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-04-12 10:06:08 AM  
Is that a Russian euphemism?
 
2021-04-12 10:07:14 AM  
the woman whose potato field he landed in

That sounds filthy.
 
2021-04-12 10:07:31 AM  
we should be speaking to Gagarin but because the Soviet Union's safety protocols were "fark it drink vodka we always have more cosmonauts" we can't.
 
2021-04-12 10:11:12 AM  
Latvians everywhere shed tears that day.
 
2021-04-12 10:12:09 AM  
'the woman whose potato field he landed in'

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/он хорош с плугом
//мы разбили картошку
 
2021-04-12 10:12:35 AM  
Ah, the heady days of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin, when the world trembled at the sound of our rockets.
 
2021-04-12 10:15:57 AM  
i.imgflip.comView Full Size
 
2021-04-12 10:17:59 AM  

strapp3r: 'the woman whose potato field he landed in'

[Fark user image image 340x388]

/он хорош с плугом
//мы разбили картошку


*Failed attempt at a Google search translating that*

*Fires up Translate app*

*Copies text*

*Pastes text*

*Hits "Translate" button*

*Finally laughs*
 
2021-04-12 10:18:08 AM  

JustLookin: Ah, the heady daysch of Schputnik and Yuri Gagarin, when the world trembled at the schound of our rocketsch.


FTFY
 
2021-04-12 10:22:03 AM  

khitsicker: we should be speaking to Gagarin but because the Soviet Union's safety protocols were "fark it drink vodka we always have more cosmonauts" we can't.


Probably still wouldn't.  Gagarin was born in 1934.  He'd be 87 years old, and average life expectancy for a male in the Soviet Union/Russia was below 70 until 2012, when he would have been 78.

Cross over point was around 1998/1999 where the life expectancy was roughly equivalent to his age (65 years)

So *POSSIBLY*, but probably not.
 
2021-04-12 10:24:12 AM  

Iowan73: Is that a Russian euphemism?


Yuri was a Russian hero, he could plow any field he wanted.
 
2021-04-12 10:24:43 AM  
Which was only 12 inches from his planned landing at the Greater Soviet Union Cosmodrone Number 15 according to Soviet reports at the time.
 
2021-04-12 10:25:13 AM  
It seems that Gagarin's space flight went better than Komarov's.
 
2021-04-12 10:25:46 AM  
Here:

"Holy assballs, I don't care what that was; it destroyed two potatoes that were meant to last us the winter."

And:

"shiat, this draws the Georgian's attention to us! "
 
2021-04-12 10:26:12 AM  
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2021-04-12 10:33:08 AM  
"Probably Human" is the name of my David Bowie inspired balalaika ensemble.
 
2021-04-12 10:46:21 AM  

ShavedOrangutan: JustLookin: Ah, the heady daysch of Schputnik and Yuri Gagarin, when the world trembled at the schound of our rocketsch.

FTFY


No, it would be like this:

Ah, the heady daysh of Shputnik and Yuri Gagarin, when the world trembled at the shound of our rocketsh.

The "sch" is too close to "shch" (Щ).   That would be appropriate spelling for a Mock German accent, but not a Mock Russian one.
 
2021-04-12 10:52:04 AM  

khitsicker: we should be speaking to Gagarin but because the Soviet Union's safety protocols were "fark it drink vodka we always have more cosmonauts" we can't.


Around the same time, the US was losing a few astronauts zipping around in their jets (I'm guessing T-33, not sure which they had available).  The USSR had no intention of losing Gagarin: he was "grounded" (i.e. no spaceflight, although they obviously let him fly in aircraft) after his historic flight.

I think this has more to do with the hotshot pilot mentality than either nation.

/Micheal Collins (guy orbiting the Moon when Neil and Buzz went for a walk) wrote a great book about his experience as an astronaut
//mentioned the losses in those jets.  I hadn't heard about them before
///also didn't use a ghost writer.  Wrote better than a ghost writer would.
 
2021-04-12 10:52:47 AM  

dittybopper: ShavedOrangutan: JustLookin: Ah, the heady daysch of Schputnik and Yuri Gagarin, when the world trembled at the schound of our rocketsch.

FTFY

No, it would be like this:

Ah, the heady daysh of Shputnik and Yuri Gagarin, when the world trembled at the shound of our rocketsh.

The "sch" is too close to "shch" (Щ).   That would be appropriate spelling for a Mock German accent, but not a Mock Russian one.


Pretty sure they're going for a regular Scottish accent.
 
2021-04-12 10:53:17 AM  
40 YEARS AGO IN AVIATION WEEK

The reusable spacecraft era began on April 12, 1981 with the launch of NASA's Space Shuttle Columbia. Piloted by astronauts John W. Young and Robert L. Crippen, the orbiter lifted off from Cape Canaveral and touched down at Edwards AFB, California two days and six hours later. Aviation Week devoted 16 pages of its April 20 issue the mission, reporting that it  "affirmed the integrity of the vehicle's propulsion, avionics, and structural systems through the most challenging ascent profile ever flown by a space vehicle."An accompanying editorial proclaimed that the shuttle "is designed to change spaceflight to a routine airline -analogous turnaround."  But while the shuttle would perform many tasks - the repair of the Hubble Space Telescope and carrying sections of the International Space Station to orbit among them - NASA never came close to meeting its original goal of 50 missions a year and carrying cargo for hundreds of dollars a pound. The fleet was retired on July 21, 2011 after 135 missions, two of them resulting in the deaths of 14 astronauts and the losses of the Challenger and Columbia orbiters.So, 20 years between Gagarin and the shuttle. And 40 years between the shuttle and almost being able to reuse rockets for manned spaceflight.
 
2021-04-12 10:54:59 AM  
dammit, should've previewed

40 YEARS AGO IN AVIATION WEEK

The reusable spacecraft era began on April 12, 1981 with the launch of NASA's Space Shuttle Columbia. Piloted by astronauts John W. Young and Robert L. Crippen, the orbiter lifted off from Cape Canaveral and touched down at Edwards AFB, California two days and six hours later. Aviation Week devoted 16 pages of its April 20 issue the mission, reporting that it  "affirmed the integrity of the vehicle's propulsion, avionics, and structural systems through the most challenging ascent profile ever flown by a space vehicle."An accompanying editorial proclaimed that the shuttle "is designed to change spaceflight to a routine airline -analogous turnaround."

But while the shuttle would perform many tasks - the repair of the Hubble Space Telescope and carrying sections of the International Space Station to orbit among them - NASA never came close to meeting its original goal of 50 missions a year and carrying cargo for hundreds of dollars a pound. The fleet was retired on July 21, 2011 after 135 missions, two of them resulting in the deaths of 14 astronauts and the losses of the Challenger and Columbia orbiters.


So, 20 years between Gagarin and the shuttle. And 40 years between the shuttle and almost being able to reuse rockets for manned spaceflight.
 
2021-04-12 10:57:48 AM  

dittybopper: ShavedOrangutan: JustLookin: Ah, the heady daysch of Schputnik and Yuri Gagarin, when the world trembled at the schound of our rocketsch.

FTFY

No, it would be like this:

Ah, the heady daysh of Shputnik and Yuri Gagarin, when the world trembled at the shound of our rocketsh.

The "sch" is too close to "shch" (Щ).   That would be appropriate spelling for a Mock German accent, but not a Mock Russian one.


64.media.tumblr.comView Full Size
 
2021-04-12 10:59:27 AM  
Nice try. It was all filmed on a sound stage in Gdańsk to hide the fact the world's flat.

Kidding. Gagarin had balls of steel. Too bad about Laika, though.
 
2021-04-12 11:09:23 AM  
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2021-04-12 11:19:04 AM  

dothemath: the woman whose potato field he landed in

That sounds filthy.


"In which who's potato field he landed."

-Beavis & Butthead do America
 
2021-04-12 11:27:43 AM  

dittybopper: ShavedOrangutan: JustLookin: Ah, the heady daysch of Schputnik and Yuri Gagarin, when the world trembled at the schound of our rocketsch.

FTFY

No, it would be like this:

Ah, the heady daysh of Shputnik and Yuri Gagarin, when the world trembled at the shound of our rocketsh.

The "sch" is too close to "shch" (Щ).   That would be appropriate spelling for a Mock German accent, but not a Mock Russian one.


Fark user imageView Full Size


/s
 
2021-04-12 11:41:10 AM  

khitsicker: we should be speaking to Gagarin but because the Soviet Union's safety protocols were "fark it drink vodka we always have more cosmonauts" we can't.


He had less than a 50/50 shot of making it into orbit.
 
2021-04-12 11:44:47 AM  

Harry Freakstorm: Which was only 12 inches from his planned landing at the Greater Soviet Union Cosmodrone Number 15 according to Soviet reports at the time.


It would be very Soviet to build a spanking-new cosmodrome where he landed, and claim a bullseye :)
 
2021-04-12 11:46:16 AM  
Russian space program all lies.
Yuri Gagarin Latvian search potato.
 
2021-04-12 11:51:10 AM  
This is why we landed in the ocean. If he had landed here some old farmer would have shot him. Then sued for damaging his field.
 
2021-04-12 11:52:46 AM  
I'd go round the world for a potato tovarishch
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-04-12 12:06:09 PM  

JustLookin: Ah, the heady days of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin, when the world trembled at the sound of our rockets.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-04-12 12:30:01 PM  

SonOfSpam: dammit, should've previewed

40 YEARS AGO IN AVIATION WEEK

The reusable spacecraft era began on April 12, 1981 with the launch of NASA's Space Shuttle Columbia. Piloted by astronauts John W. Young and Robert L. Crippen, the orbiter lifted off from Cape Canaveral and touched down at Edwards AFB, California two days and six hours later. Aviation Week devoted 16 pages of its April 20 issue the mission, reporting that it  "affirmed the integrity of the vehicle's propulsion, avionics, and structural systems through the most challenging ascent profile ever flown by a space vehicle."An accompanying editorial proclaimed that the shuttle "is designed to change spaceflight to a routine airline -analogous turnaround."

But while the shuttle would perform many tasks - the repair of the Hubble Space Telescope and carrying sections of the International Space Station to orbit among them - NASA never came close to meeting its original goal of 50 missions a year and carrying cargo for hundreds of dollars a pound. The fleet was retired on July 21, 2011 after 135 missions, two of them resulting in the deaths of 14 astronauts and the losses of the Challenger and Columbia orbiters.

So, 20 years between Gagarin and the shuttle. And 40 years between the shuttle and almost being able to reuse rockets for manned spaceflight.


Space Shuttle was a piece of shiat.
 
2021-04-12 12:30:29 PM  
Potato field?   I thought he landed on an island with six other castaways.
 
2021-04-12 1:07:34 PM  

Creepy Lurker Guy: Potato field?   I thought he landed on an island with six other castaways.


static.tvmaze.comView Full Size
 
2021-04-12 1:20:04 PM  
Yuri Gagarin started his flight in 1961 as a 1st lieutenant.

https://www.cs.mcgill.ca/~rwest/wikis​p​eedia/wpcd/wp/y/Yuri_Gagarin.htm
While in orbit Gagarin was promoted "in the field" from the lowly rank of Senior Lieutenant to Major - and this was the rank at which TASS announced him in its triumphant statement during the flight. At the time the Soviet authorities thought it was more likely he would perish during his descent than survive.

So he skipped being a captain and was later rapidly promoted to colonel.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuri_Ga​g​arin
He became a lieutenant colonel of the Soviet Air Forces on 12 June 1962, and received the rank of colonel on 6 November 1963.[23]

To keep the hero alive he was banned from space flight and even air flight. In 1968 he began retraining as a pilot but died along with his flight instructor when their MiG-15UTI crashed.
 
2021-04-12 1:23:31 PM  

HairBolus: Yuri Gagarin started his flight in 1961 as a 1st lieutenant.

https://www.cs.mcgill.ca/~rwest/wikisp​eedia/wpcd/wp/y/Yuri_Gagarin.htm
While in orbit Gagarin was promoted "in the field" from the lowly rank of Senior Lieutenant to Major - and this was the rank at which TASS announced him in its triumphant statement during the flight. At the time the Soviet authorities thought it was more likely he would perish during his descent than survive.

So he skipped being a captain and was later rapidly promoted to colonel.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuri_Gag​arin
He became a lieutenant colonel of the Soviet Air Forces on 12 June 1962, and received the rank of colonel on 6 November 1963.[23]

To keep the hero alive he was banned from space flight and even air flight. In 1968 he began retraining as a pilot but died along with his flight instructor when their MiG-15UTI crashed.


UTIs are never fun.
 
2021-04-12 1:49:40 PM  
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Potato Farm
 
2021-04-12 1:54:32 PM  

Ragin' Asian: Nice try. It was all filmed on a sound stage in Gdańsk to hide the fact the world's flat.

Kidding. Gagarin had balls of steel. Too bad about Laika, though.


Despite the propaganda at the time, Laika was basically cooked alive in the capsule.
 
2021-04-12 2:19:44 PM  
th.bing.comView Full Size


Don Knotts / Leslie Nielsen  classic
 
2021-04-12 2:34:39 PM  

i state your name: HairBolus: Yuri Gagarin started his flight in 1961 as a 1st lieutenant.

https://www.cs.mcgill.ca/~rwest/wikisp​eedia/wpcd/wp/y/Yuri_Gagarin.htm
While in orbit Gagarin was promoted "in the field" from the lowly rank of Senior Lieutenant to Major - and this was the rank at which TASS announced him in its triumphant statement during the flight. At the time the Soviet authorities thought it was more likely he would perish during his descent than survive.

So he skipped being a captain and was later rapidly promoted to colonel.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuri_Gag​arin
He became a lieutenant colonel of the Soviet Air Forces on 12 June 1962, and received the rank of colonel on 6 November 1963.[23]

To keep the hero alive he was banned from space flight and even air flight. In 1968 he began retraining as a pilot but died along with his flight instructor when their MiG-15UTI crashed.

UTIs are never fun.


Nonsense!

Fark user imageView Full Size


I had plenty of fun, digging through my brain and remembering Cyrillic and puzzling out stuff as I sat there.
 
2021-04-12 3:19:57 PM  

dittybopper: i state your name: HairBolus: Yuri Gagarin started his flight in 1961 as a 1st lieutenant.

https://www.cs.mcgill.ca/~rwest/wikisp​eedia/wpcd/wp/y/Yuri_Gagarin.htm
While in orbit Gagarin was promoted "in the field" from the lowly rank of Senior Lieutenant to Major - and this was the rank at which TASS announced him in its triumphant statement during the flight. At the time the Soviet authorities thought it was more likely he would perish during his descent than survive.

So he skipped being a captain and was later rapidly promoted to colonel.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuri_Gag​arin
He became a lieutenant colonel of the Soviet Air Forces on 12 June 1962, and received the rank of colonel on 6 November 1963.[23]

To keep the hero alive he was banned from space flight and even air flight. In 1968 he began retraining as a pilot but died along with his flight instructor when their MiG-15UTI crashed.

UTIs are never fun.

Nonsense!

[Fark user image 850x477]

I had plenty of fun, digging through my brain and remembering Cyrillic and puzzling out stuff as I sat there.


I'm not one to kinkshame, but fark is not your personal erotica site.

/or so I've been told
 
2021-04-12 3:21:56 PM  
So, tonight's Uri's Night! Celebrate the first human off the planet and into space!
 
2021-04-12 3:42:05 PM  

stuffy: This is why we landed in the ocean. If he had landed here some old farmer would have shot him. Then sued for damaging his field.


And if Gagarin landed few kilometers to the north, Khrushev would personally stab him with
corn and squash with Tsar-Shoe

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