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(The Daily Beast)   Police use airplane water bottle from 1985 to nab murder suspect. And I thought the food on my last flight looked old   (thedailybeast.com) divider line
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3748 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Apr 2021 at 12:14 PM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-04-11 9:45:52 AM  
*RTFA*

*Looks at headline again*
media.tenor.comView Full Size
 
2021-04-11 10:47:45 AM  
In February 2021, investigators were able to use modern technology to match the ski mask DNA to the suspect's parents.

This sounds like they got him through a DNA genealogy registry.
 
2021-04-11 11:32:42 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


Fark: where even the submitter doesn't read the article.
 
2021-04-11 11:58:01 AM  

Giant Clown Shoe: [Fark user image 500x281] [View Full Size image _x_]

Fark: where even the submitter doesn't read the article.


Fark isnt Playboy. No one reads the articles here.
 
2021-04-11 12:21:18 PM  

Barfmaker: In February 2021, investigators were able to use modern technology to match the ski mask DNA to the suspect's parents.

This sounds like they got him through a DNA genealogy registry.


Based on DNA from a ski mask from 1985, they identified a likely relative in a genealogy registry. From there they suspected a particular individual and while monitoring him swiped a water bottle he drank out of in February 2021. DNA from that water bottle matched to the mask with a high degree of certainty.
 
2021-04-11 12:22:04 PM  

Barfmaker: This sounds like they got him through a DNA genealogy registry.


Things like this are why I submitted a DNA test with someone else's sample. Police trying to trace any crimes to me might hit on family but then find a completely unrelated DNA profile linked to me. They will likely assume I was adopted and move on.
 
2021-04-11 12:26:17 PM  
The Roger Dean murder was a weird one.  Dean waited for the killer to come to his house, as he was seen waiting at his garage for him long after he usually went to work.  Later, his wife overheard Dean telling the killer he'd go with him to the bank to withdraw $30,000 (which the killer claimed Dean owed him), but as the two were leaving the house, the killer shot him five times and ran away instead, apparently forgetting about the $30k.

Then a few years later the killer threatened Dean's family and demanded $100k in cash.  Dean's widow, working with authorities, put the $100k in the drop location, but the killer never took the money and instead threatened the family again for "not following directions".  Up till now, that was the last thing heard from the killer.
 
2021-04-11 12:27:32 PM  
Airplane bottles?

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-04-11 12:28:16 PM  
Food? On a flight?
 
2021-04-11 12:28:26 PM  

mrmopar5287: Barfmaker: This sounds like they got him through a DNA genealogy registry.

Things like this are why I submitted a DNA test with someone else's sample. Police trying to trace any crimes to me might hit on family but then find a completely unrelated DNA profile linked to me. They will likely assume I was adopted and move on.


The ol' "modified Israel Keyes trick" (Keyes would raid trash cans for old coffee cups or cigarette butts to discard at his crime scenes).
 
2021-04-11 12:30:25 PM  

mrmopar5287: Barfmaker: This sounds like they got him through a DNA genealogy registry.

Things like this are why I submitted a DNA test with someone else's sample. Police trying to trace any crimes to me might hit on family but then find a completely unrelated DNA profile linked to me. They will likely assume I was adopted and move on.


Or that random person will kill a guy and you'll go to jail based on incontrovertible proof.

// yeah I know you could be retested and that should exonerate you....
 
2021-04-11 12:31:37 PM  
1985 - murder happens
2003 - CBI enters DNA profile due to technology improvements, no matches
2018 - "Investigators' (CBI? private?) have a new analysis done and get different results
2020 - another investigator figures out the 2018 data points to parents of suspect
2020/2021 - 2020 data leads law enforcement to this guy

Is it common for CO state police to keep returning to 18 year old, then 33 year old, and finally 35 year old cases?  Is Colorado doing this now for all the murders they have DNA evidence for that went unsolved due to lack of tech when they occurred? Not questioning the validity of this one at all, just curious why this case in particular got so much follow through or if they all are.
 
2021-04-11 12:32:43 PM  

The Third Man: mrmopar5287: Barfmaker: This sounds like they got him through a DNA genealogy registry.

Things like this are why I submitted a DNA test with someone else's sample. Police trying to trace any crimes to me might hit on family but then find a completely unrelated DNA profile linked to me. They will likely assume I was adopted and move on.

The ol' "modified Israel Keyes trick" (Keyes would raid trash cans for old coffee cups or cigarette butts to discard at his crime scenes).


Some random hair from barber shop trash also helps.
 
2021-04-11 12:34:23 PM  

New Rising Sun: 1985 - murder happens
2003 - CBI enters DNA profile due to technology improvements, no matches
2018 - "Investigators' (CBI? private?) have a new analysis done and get different results
2020 - another investigator figures out the 2018 data points to parents of suspect
2020/2021 - 2020 data leads law enforcement to this guy

Is it common for CO state police to keep returning to 18 year old, then 33 year old, and finally 35 year old cases?  Is Colorado doing this now for all the murders they have DNA evidence for that went unsolved due to lack of tech when they occurred? Not questioning the validity of this one at all, just curious why this case in particular got so much follow through or if they all are.


Departments who have the budget frequently turn through cold cases. New detectives are assigned to review, maybe find things that were missed, or technology advances help move it forward.
 
2021-04-11 12:40:05 PM  

New Rising Sun: 1985 - murder happens
2003 - CBI enters DNA profile due to technology improvements, no matches
2018 - "Investigators' (CBI? private?) have a new analysis done and get different results
2020 - another investigator figures out the 2018 data points to parents of suspect
2020/2021 - 2020 data leads law enforcement to this guy

Is it common for CO state police to keep returning to 18 year old, then 33 year old, and finally 35 year old cases?  Is Colorado doing this now for all the murders they have DNA evidence for that went unsolved due to lack of tech when they occurred? Not questioning the validity of this one at all, just curious why this case in particular got so much follow through or if they all are.


There was a case in Montana where two men who'd spent decades in prison were exonerated because their DNA wasn't found on the older evidence, but someone else's was:
https://helenair.com/news/local/crime​-​and-courts/men-wrongfully-convicted-in​-montana-city-homicide-each-get-6m-set​tlements/article_e3d49fd1-9023-5aea-a9​a8-da17c5baf002.html
 
2021-04-11 12:40:30 PM  
Truckers piss in them and chuck them on the sides of the road.

I'd use these:

image.shutterstock.comView Full Size
 
2021-04-11 1:19:44 PM  

Salmon: Truckers piss in them and chuck them on the sides of the road.

I'd use these:

[image.shutterstock.com image 277x280]


It's the way of the road.
 
2021-04-11 1:23:13 PM  

Barfmaker: In February 2021, investigators were able to use modern technology to match the ski mask DNA to the suspect's parents.

This sounds like they got him through a DNA genealogy registry.


They did, but needed a direct dna sample from him.

My relative's killers were caught with a discarded cigarette butt. The detective working the case in the early 80's had a strong hunch it was the two ultimately arrested for it but we needed to wait until
DNA technology caught up enough in the early 2000's to pin it on them without a doubt.

I will always be grateful to the detective who continued working the case even after he retired.
 
2021-04-11 1:31:14 PM  

ocd002: Barfmaker: In February 2021, investigators were able to use modern technology to match the ski mask DNA to the suspect's parents.

This sounds like they got him through a DNA genealogy registry.

They did, but needed a direct dna sample from him.

My relative's killers were caught with a discarded cigarette butt. The detective working the case in the early 80's had a strong hunch it was the two ultimately arrested for it but we needed to wait until
DNA technology caught up enough in the early 2000's to pin it on them without a doubt.

I will always be grateful to the detective who continued working the case even after he retired.


I'm sorry to hear about that

I am glad that eventually the killers were caught
 
2021-04-11 1:48:36 PM  
I didn't know airplanes needed water
 
2021-04-11 2:11:21 PM  

New Rising Sun: 1985 - murder happens
2003 - CBI enters DNA profile due to technology improvements, no matches
2018 - "Investigators' (CBI? private?) have a new analysis done and get different results
2020 - another investigator figures out the 2018 data points to parents of suspect
2020/2021 - 2020 data leads law enforcement to this guy

Is it common for CO state police to keep returning to 18 year old, then 33 year old, and finally 35 year old cases?  Is Colorado doing this now for all the murders they have DNA evidence for that went unsolved due to lack of tech when they occurred? Not questioning the validity of this one at all, just curious why this case in particular got so much follow through or if they all are.


My assumption is they are, but we don't hear about other instances because their investigations don't end up going anywhere and the cases remain unsolved.
 
2021-04-11 2:12:21 PM  
I love how the they caught BTK....after 20 or so years of no contact with the police, he resurfaced and sent them - this being around 2004 - when presumably, people had a working knowledge of those shiatty 1.44MB floppy disks.

His dumb ass sends the PD one, with as the cliche goes, "information only the killer would know".  he asks the police, "there's like, NO WAY you can backtrace the internet and track this disk to me, right?  I mean, I wore gloves so there's no fingerprints on it.  You guys promise me you can't back trace this?"

Wichita PD:  "oh no, BTK, we could never, ever, ever do that.  That's like, science fiction stuff.  Keep sending us floppy drives."

he does, they right click it. "Properties: Wichita 1st Presbyterian Church.  Author: "D. Rader."

a 10 second google search should Doug Rader as the lay minister of the church and he was arrested days later.  Idiot.
 
2021-04-11 2:37:40 PM  

Barfmaker: In February 2021, investigators were able to use modern technology to match the ski mask DNA to the suspect's parents.

This sounds like they got him through a DNA genealogy registry.


Pro tip: If you commit murder, don't let any of your family do a DNA test.

New Rising Sun: 1985 - murder happens
2003 - CBI enters DNA profile due to technology improvements, no matches
2018 - "Investigators' (CBI? private?) have a new analysis done and get different results
2020 - another investigator figures out the 2018 data points to parents of suspect
2020/2021 - 2020 data leads law enforcement to this guy

Is it common for CO state police to keep returning to 18 year old, then 33 year old, and finally 35 year old cases?  Is Colorado doing this now for all the murders they have DNA evidence for that went unsolved due to lack of tech when they occurred? Not questioning the validity of this one at all, just curious why this case in particular got so much follow through or if they all are.


Doing the check doesn't take very long. It's not like anyone has to do anything by hand. I'm thinking they probably have the search done on older cases automated, so it does the search every X amount of time (to compare to new data) without anyone being involved and only contacts a human if they get a positive result. That's the way I would design it anyway.
 
2021-04-11 2:52:32 PM  
Cold case does not mean closed case.
 
2021-04-11 4:18:05 PM  

mrmopar5287: Barfmaker: This sounds like they got him through a DNA genealogy registry.

Things like this are why I submitted a DNA test with someone else's sample. Police trying to trace any crimes to me might hit on family but then find a completely unrelated DNA profile linked to me. They will likely assume I was adopted and move on.


And then your donor murders somebody and the cops come and kill you when you reach to adjust your pants.
 
2021-04-11 4:43:14 PM  

rickythepenguin: I love how the they caught BTK....after 20 or so years of no contact with the police, he resurfaced and sent them - this being around 2004 - when presumably, people had a working knowledge of those shiatty 1.44MB floppy disks.

His dumb ass sends the PD one, with as the cliche goes, "information only the killer would know".  he asks the police, "there's like, NO WAY you can backtrace the internet and track this disk to me, right?  I mean, I wore gloves so there's no fingerprints on it.  You guys promise me you can't back trace this?"

Wichita PD:  "oh no, BTK, we could never, ever, ever do that.  That's like, science fiction stuff.  Keep sending us floppy drives."

he does, they right click it. "Properties: Wichita 1st Presbyterian Church.  Author: "D. Rader."

a 10 second google search should Doug Rader as the lay minister of the church and he was arrested days later.  Idiot.


Lutheran church, but close enough.
 
2021-04-11 4:43:38 PM  

rickythepenguin: I love how the they caught BTK....after 20 or so years of no contact with the police, he resurfaced and sent them - this being around 2004 - when presumably, people had a working knowledge of those shiatty 1.44MB floppy disks.

His dumb ass sends the PD one, with as the cliche goes, "information only the killer would know".  he asks the police, "there's like, NO WAY you can backtrace the internet and track this disk to me, right?  I mean, I wore gloves so there's no fingerprints on it.  You guys promise me you can't back trace this?"

Wichita PD:  "oh no, BTK, we could never, ever, ever do that.  That's like, science fiction stuff.  Keep sending us floppy drives."

he does, they right click it. "Properties: Wichita 1st Presbyterian Church.  Author: "D. Rader."

a 10 second google search should Doug Rader as the lay minister of the church and he was arrested days later.  Idiot.


Also, Dennis not Doug.
 
2021-04-11 4:46:11 PM  

pjbreeze: I didn't know airplanes needed water


If they aren't properly hydrated, the skin gets wrinkled, which increases drag, hurts fuel economy.
 
2021-04-11 5:19:40 PM  

NotARocketScientist: Doing the check doesn't take very long. It's not like anyone has to do anything by hand. I'm thinking they probably have the search done on older cases automated, so it does the search every X amount of time (to compare to new data) without anyone being involved and only contacts a human if they get a positive result. That's the way I would design it anyway.


When they have unknown DNA from a crime scene, it gets entered in a database and scanned for matches every month or so. That's how they caught Alexander Christopher Ewing when his DNA was finally entered in the system 30 years after he murdered four people.
 
2021-04-11 5:47:31 PM  
That is a bummer, as Dean had designed some of the trippiest, coolest Yes album covers.
 
2021-04-11 6:02:38 PM  

lycanth: pjbreeze: I didn't know airplanes needed water

If they aren't properly hydrated, the skin gets wrinkled, which increases drag, hurts fuel economy.


Indeed.
Fark user imageView Full Size


/B-52
//Yes, that is normal
///Yes, they are designed that way
 
2021-04-11 6:59:22 PM  

rickythepenguin: I love how the they caught BTK....after 20 or so years of no contact with the police, he resurfaced and sent them - this being around 2004 - when presumably, people had a working knowledge of those shiatty 1.44MB floppy disks.

His dumb ass sends the PD one, with as the cliche goes, "information only the killer would know".  he asks the police, "there's like, NO WAY you can backtrace the internet and track this disk to me, right?  I mean, I wore gloves so there's no fingerprints on it.  You guys promise me you can't back trace this?"

Wichita PD:  "oh no, BTK, we could never, ever, ever do that.  That's like, science fiction stuff.  Keep sending us floppy drives."

he does, they right click it. "Properties: Wichita 1st Presbyterian Church.  Author: "D. Rader."

a 10 second google search should Doug Rader as the lay minister of the church and he was arrested days later.  Idiot.


More specifically to that case: the initial DNA match was made by taking a warrant (with double secret probation or something to tell the hospital staff they aren't to say a damned word) to the hospital and got a tissue sample from his daughter's PAP smear. That was a match to say BTK was her father, and they followed up by arresting him.
 
2021-04-11 7:00:16 PM  

jjorsett: And then your donor murders somebody


The donor was a comatose guy close to death in a nursing home. He wasn't going to ever be going out and killing anyone.
 
2021-04-11 8:17:55 PM  

New Rising Sun: Is it common for CO state police to keep returning to 18 year old, then 33 year old, and finally 35 year old cases?  Is Colorado doing this now for all the murders they have DNA evidence for that went unsolved due to lack of tech when they occurred?


Why? Are you worried?
 
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