Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Some ASDIC)   Today is the anniversary of the passing of Hal Lawrence, half of a duo of Canadian sailors who forced the surrender of a Nazi U-boat . . . while mostly nude   (militaryhistorynow.com) divider line
    More: Hero, Submarine, German U-boats, U-boat, Sub-Lieutenant Hal Lawrence, effective German U-boat patrols, merchant ships, World War II, World War I  
•       •       •

4088 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Apr 2021 at 8:05 AM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



61 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2021-04-11 8:08:21 AM  
"Mostly" nude? Like a little bit pregnant or dead?
 
2021-04-11 8:08:48 AM  
Grandma is mostly dead. Mostly.
 
2021-04-11 8:09:37 AM  
They saw his torpedo and surrendered?
 
2021-04-11 8:10:51 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-04-11 8:16:33 AM  
Salute, 🍺
 
2021-04-11 8:18:13 AM  

brantgoose: "Mostly" nude? Like a little bit pregnant or dead?


Batman nude - utility belt was all there was.
 
2021-04-11 8:18:19 AM  
I read that erotica. It was pretty hot.

I have to go take care something happening in my pants.
 
2021-04-11 8:25:43 AM  

Some Junkie Cosmonaut: brantgoose: "Mostly" nude? Like a little bit pregnant or dead?

Batman nude - utility belt was all there was.


Hey now, he had a helmet too!
 
2021-04-11 8:26:02 AM  
Meh, we're all mostly nude under our clothes.
 
2021-04-11 8:26:56 AM  

Some Junkie Cosmonaut: brantgoose: "Mostly" nude? Like a little bit pregnant or dead?

Batman nude - utility belt was all there was.


So a little less than this, minus the boots.

static1.squarespace.comView Full Size
 
2021-04-11 8:29:47 AM  

TommyDeuce: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: brantgoose: "Mostly" nude? Like a little bit pregnant or dead?

Batman nude - utility belt was all there was.

So a little less than this, minus the boots.

[static1.squarespace.com image 850x1132]


That man in that pic has a ponytail, and is wearing b*tch-boots and a bikini.

And he's still badass.
 
2021-04-11 8:32:03 AM  
Antifa pervs!!
 
2021-04-11 8:36:23 AM  
For an article about nearly naked seamen, that article was disappointingly unarousing.
 
2021-04-11 8:37:48 AM  

NobleHam: For an article about nearly naked seamen, that article was disappointingly unarousing.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-04-11 8:44:41 AM  
We're dealing with Nazis, let's call it a yarzheit.
 
2021-04-11 8:46:10 AM  
Was he Porky Piggin' it?
 
2021-04-11 8:55:30 AM  

brantgoose: "Mostly" nude? Like a little bit pregnant or dead?


moistly nude.
 
2021-04-11 9:15:56 AM  

TommyDeuce: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: brantgoose: "Mostly" nude? Like a little bit pregnant or dead?

Batman nude - utility belt was all there was.

So a little less than this, minus the boots.

[static1.squarespace.com image 850x1132]


Reported for calling out a farker?
 
2021-04-11 9:22:20 AM  
I love this story.  HMCS Oakville is named after the town I live in, as was tradition until the Navy realized how pairing ships with towns had potential for being a moral killer if the ship was lost.
 
2021-04-11 9:25:42 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-04-11 9:27:21 AM  
Das Booty
 
2021-04-11 9:32:29 AM  

brantgoose: Grandma is mostly dead. Mostly.


Mostly dead is slightly alive.
 
2021-04-11 9:33:17 AM  

reyreyrey: Antifa pervs!!


More likely they were royalists. Or at least imperialists.
 
2021-04-11 9:36:15 AM  
(Some ASDIC)


HAHA!  I detect much anti-submarine humor!
 
2021-04-11 9:41:43 AM  
It's not mentioned in TFA or on his Wikipedia page, but the commander of the U-boat, KL Otto Ites, was the guy who figured out the final flaw in German torpedoes.  IIRC, the torpedoes would run deep because of a leak in the hydrostatic chamber, so if the boat stayed underwater for a while the pressure in the boat would rise as they added oxygen and that would raise the pressure in the hydrostatic chambers of the torpedoes.  That made the torpedo think it was running more shallow than it was set for when fired and so it would run deeper.

After Ites found and reported that defect, corrective actions were taken and the T2-G7e torpedoes were pretty damn reliable.

Of the major naval combatants, only Japan entered the war with reliable torpedoes.  Every one else had serious issues with their torpedoes because they were all stingy on funds for testing, amongst other factors.  Torpedoes are expensive, so adequate testing costs a lot of money.
 
2021-04-11 9:50:22 AM  
Storming a ship is not nearly as easy as it sounds.
 
2021-04-11 9:53:03 AM  

tree_meat: I love this story.  HMCS Oakville is named after the town I live in, as was tradition until the Navy realized how pairing ships with towns had potential for being a moral killer if the ship was lost.


One of the problems with Canadian ship names during WWII is that the ones named after First Nations tribes like HMCS Athabaskan had to be spelled out in in the codes used for things like convoy duty because they weren't in the codes as single words, and that gave the Beobachtungsdienst a wedge to help break those codes.
 
2021-04-11 9:53:09 AM  

dittybopper: It's not mentioned in TFA or on his Wikipedia page, but the commander of the U-boat, KL Otto Ites, was the guy who figured out the final flaw in German torpedoes.  IIRC, the torpedoes would run deep because of a leak in the hydrostatic chamber, so if the boat stayed underwater for a while the pressure in the boat would rise as they added oxygen and that would raise the pressure in the hydrostatic chambers of the torpedoes.  That made the torpedo think it was running more shallow than it was set for when fired and so it would run deeper.

After Ites found and reported that defect, corrective actions were taken and the T2-G7e torpedoes were pretty damn reliable.

Of the major naval combatants, only Japan entered the war with reliable torpedoes.  Every one else had serious issues with their torpedoes because they were all stingy on funds for testing, amongst other factors.  Torpedoes are expensive, so adequate testing costs a lot of money.


U-boats added oxygen?

The problem with the US torpedos was next level. It wasn't just that testing torpedos is expensive; Navy Torpedo Station Newport was criminally incompetent and corrupt even by Rhode Island standards.
 
2021-04-11 9:53:50 AM  
So like what goes on in the average Berlin nightclub on a regular basis?
 
2021-04-11 9:54:41 AM  

dittybopper: tree_meat: I love this story.  HMCS Oakville is named after the town I live in, as was tradition until the Navy realized how pairing ships with towns had potential for being a moral killer if the ship was lost.

One of the problems with Canadian ship names during WWII is that the ones named after First Nations tribes like HMCS Athabaskan had to be spelled out in in the codes used for things like convoy duty because they weren't in the codes as single words, and that gave the Beobachtungsdienst a wedge to help break those codes.


Seems like the kind of thing call signs are for.
 
2021-04-11 10:02:11 AM  

tree_meat: I love this story.  HMCS Oakville is named after the town I live in, as was tradition until the Navy realized how pairing ships with towns had potential for being a moral killer if the ship was lost.


Same for naming gold fish or Beta fish after family members.
 
2021-04-11 10:06:34 AM  
Great story. Would make a good movie. I'm thinking Scarlett Johansson as the lead.

Submarine movies are great.
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-04-11 10:11:00 AM  
rabbitandsnail.files.wordpress.comView Full Size
 
2021-04-11 10:11:51 AM  
That at looks like it belongs on the cover off this
sierraclub.typepad.comView Full Size
 
2021-04-11 10:12:00 AM  
*art
 
2021-04-11 10:19:19 AM  
I dunno, with a life expectancy of about 60 days, I doubt it would be hard to get a U Boat crew to surrender....
 
2021-04-11 10:28:09 AM  
I've had many women say "I give up" after seeing me nude subby
 
2021-04-11 10:28:27 AM  

g.fro: dittybopper: It's not mentioned in TFA or on his Wikipedia page, but the commander of the U-boat, KL Otto Ites, was the guy who figured out the final flaw in German torpedoes.  IIRC, the torpedoes would run deep because of a leak in the hydrostatic chamber, so if the boat stayed underwater for a while the pressure in the boat would rise as they added oxygen and that would raise the pressure in the hydrostatic chambers of the torpedoes.  That made the torpedo think it was running more shallow than it was set for when fired and so it would run deeper.

After Ites found and reported that defect, corrective actions were taken and the T2-G7e torpedoes were pretty damn reliable.

Of the major naval combatants, only Japan entered the war with reliable torpedoes.  Every one else had serious issues with their torpedoes because they were all stingy on funds for testing, amongst other factors.  Torpedoes are expensive, so adequate testing costs a lot of money.

U-boats added oxygen?

The problem with the US torpedos was next level. It wasn't just that testing torpedos is expensive; Navy Torpedo Station Newport was criminally incompetent and corrupt even by Rhode Island standards.


The Germans had the exact same problem.  The organization that was responsible for torpedo development was adamant that the faults were with the crews not the torpedoes themselves.  It wasn't until Grand Admiral Raeder fired Admiral Oskar Wehr, head of the Torpedo Directorate, in late 1939 after a bunch of failures that progress was made by his successor, Admiral Oskar Kummetz.  But it wasn't until January 30th, 1942 that KL Ites provided the final clue.

The US issue is better known among Americans, because until Clay Blair published his excellent and very comprehensive two volume set "Hitler's U-Boat War" in the 1990's, this story really hadn't been told in the literature (at least in English).
 
2021-04-11 10:30:00 AM  

g.fro: dittybopper: It's not mentioned in TFA or on his Wikipedia page, but the commander of the U-boat, KL Otto Ites, was the guy who figured out the final flaw in German torpedoes.  IIRC, the torpedoes would run deep because of a leak in the hydrostatic chamber, so if the boat stayed underwater for a while the pressure in the boat would rise as they added oxygen and that would raise the pressure in the hydrostatic chambers of the torpedoes.  That made the torpedo think it was running more shallow than it was set for when fired and so it would run deeper.

After Ites found and reported that defect, corrective actions were taken and the T2-G7e torpedoes were pretty damn reliable.

Of the major naval combatants, only Japan entered the war with reliable torpedoes.  Every one else had serious issues with their torpedoes because they were all stingy on funds for testing, amongst other factors.  Torpedoes are expensive, so adequate testing costs a lot of money.

U-boats added oxygen?

The problem with the US torpedos was next level. It wasn't just that testing torpedos is expensive; Navy Torpedo Station Newport was criminally incompetent and corrupt even by Rhode Island standards.


Well, compressed air to replace oxygen used up during extended dives.
 
2021-04-11 10:42:20 AM  

g.fro: dittybopper: tree_meat: I love this story.  HMCS Oakville is named after the town I live in, as was tradition until the Navy realized how pairing ships with towns had potential for being a moral killer if the ship was lost.

One of the problems with Canadian ship names during WWII is that the ones named after First Nations tribes like HMCS Athabaskan had to be spelled out in in the codes used for things like convoy duty because they weren't in the codes as single words, and that gave the Beobachtungsdienst a wedge to help break those codes.

Seems like the kind of thing call signs are for.


Random freighters in convoy wouldn't have a list of all USN, RN, RCN, etc. ship call signs. Also, call signs are mostly for communications purposes as a short-hand way to call other ships.  It's much easier to send NMJY instead of "USS Albacore" or NBGC instead of "USS Hornet", especially if you're using Morse code.

Plus, those call signs in war would be deprecated and changed on a very regular basis to try to avoid traffic analysis, and again, you wouldn't deliver those lists to every single ship, at least ahead of time.  But these are external call signs, used to call other ships, and generally not used in internal communications.
 
2021-04-11 10:47:25 AM  

cwheelie: I've had many women say "I give up" after seeing me nude subby


I have that trouble with Where's Waldo also.
 
2021-04-11 10:50:38 AM  
For both crews, it has been a long voyage.

First Mate: :"Kaptain, nude men have boarded our ship!"
Kaptain: "And me in this tacky uniform! Ask them to wait, while I slip into something more appropriate."

"And many a 'torpedo' was polished that night"
 
2021-04-11 10:54:27 AM  

dittybopper: ...

Random freighters in convoy wouldn't have a list of all USN, RN, RCN, etc. ship call signs. Also, call signs are mostly for communications purposes as a short-hand way to call other ships.  It's much easier to send NMJY instead of "USS Albacore" or NBGC instead of "USS Hornet", especially if you're using Morse code.

Plus, those call signs in war would be deprecated and changed on a very regular basis to try to avoid traffic analysis, and again, you wouldn't deliver those lists to every single ship, at least ahead of time.  But these are external call signs, used to call other ships, and generally not used in internal communications.


But the question remains, why were they sending ship names in messages anyway? I get that ships aren't going to be using their ITU call signs in wartime, but one would think every ship in a convoy would have the call signs for all the other ships in that convoy. As for communication about a warship outside of convoy comms, I would think it would be easier to use their hull classification symbol (US) or pennant number (Empire) than spelling the name out.
 
2021-04-11 11:07:39 AM  
typical canadians
 
2021-04-11 11:11:00 AM  

orbister: [rabbitandsnail.files.wordpress.com image 640x360]


30 seconds before: "PRESENT ARMS!"
 
2021-04-11 11:17:40 AM  

g.fro: dittybopper: ...

Random freighters in convoy wouldn't have a list of all USN, RN, RCN, etc. ship call signs. Also, call signs are mostly for communications purposes as a short-hand way to call other ships.  It's much easier to send NMJY instead of "USS Albacore" or NBGC instead of "USS Hornet", especially if you're using Morse code.

Plus, those call signs in war would be deprecated and changed on a very regular basis to try to avoid traffic analysis, and again, you wouldn't deliver those lists to every single ship, at least ahead of time.  But these are external call signs, used to call other ships, and generally not used in internal communications.

But the question remains, why were they sending ship names in messages anyway? I get that ships aren't going to be using their ITU call signs in wartime, but one would think every ship in a convoy would have the call signs for all the other ships in that convoy. As for communication about a warship outside of convoy comms, I would think it would be easier to use their hull classification symbol (US) or pennant number (Empire) than spelling the name out.


I have no idea, but it is mentioned in the literature.  Perhaps because multinational force?
 
2021-04-11 11:49:57 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


R.I.P.
 
2021-04-11 12:18:36 PM  
Saw a documentary recently about Hedy Lamarr - and her invention related to torpedoes.

"Lamarr made her great breakthrough in the early years of World War II when trying to invent a device to block enemy ships from jamming torpedo guidance signals. No one knows what prompted the idea, but Antheil confirmed that it was Lamarr's design, from which he created a practical model.

They found a way for the radio guidance transmitter and the torpedo's receiver to jump simultaneously from frequency to frequency, making it impossible for the enemy to locate and block a message before it had moved to another frequency. This approach became known as "frequency hopping.""

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smiths​o​nian-institution/thank-world-war-ii-er​a-film-star-your-wi-fi-180971584/
 
2021-04-11 12:21:10 PM  

bifster: Saw a documentary recently about Hedy Lamarr - and her invention related to torpedoes.

"Lamarr made her great breakthrough in the early years of World War II when trying to invent a device to block enemy ships from jamming torpedo guidance signals. No one knows what prompted the idea, but Antheil confirmed that it was Lamarr's design, from which he created a practical model.

They found a way for the radio guidance transmitter and the torpedo's receiver to jump simultaneously from frequency to frequency, making it impossible for the enemy to locate and block a message before it had moved to another frequency. This approach became known as "frequency hopping.""

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithso​nian-institution/thank-world-war-ii-er​a-film-star-your-wi-fi-180971584/


It's Hedley!
 
2021-04-11 12:37:47 PM  

MythDragon: That at looks like it belongs on the cover off this
[sierraclub.typepad.com image 660x873]


I always wonder what the fark he did to those weasels. They're like 1-2kg animals.
 
Displayed 50 of 61 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.