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(YouTube)   Every wondered how Wooshestir Sauce is made? Wonder no more, and try not to puke   (youtube.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy  
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946 clicks; posted to Food » on 10 Apr 2021 at 10:30 PM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-04-10 6:23:55 PM  
Somebody must have been trying to mock "How It's Made".

Well, they tried, anyway, I guess.
 
2021-04-10 6:24:16 PM  
Attention Unfunny Video Producers: your video was unfunny.

I say that knowing full well my post is also unfunny...you're just more unfunny. Next time make an informative video instead of a sarcastic unfunny video.

That is all.

P.S. choke on a fermented sardine
 
2021-04-10 6:29:17 PM  
The saddest thing of all is, when I looked up how it is actually made I found this:

Interestingly, the version of Lea & Perrins Worcestershire sauce sold in the U.S. differs from the U.K. recipe. It uses distilled white vinegar rather than malt vinegar. In addition, it has three times as much sugar and sodium. This makes the American version sweeter and saltier than the version sold in Britain and Canada.

We Americans really are farking barbarians.
 
2021-04-10 6:31:27 PM  
American Dad Kalus Worcestershire
Youtube Gpl5WMdRhX8
 
2021-04-10 7:10:10 PM  
Anchovies baby.
 
2021-04-10 8:11:05 PM  
Fish Sauce is the real deal
 
2021-04-10 9:25:58 PM  
I will put that shiat on everything meat until the day I die.

Which might be soon because I put that shiat on everything.
 
2021-04-10 9:45:52 PM  

italie: I will put that shiat on everything meat until the day I die.

Which might be soon because I put that shiat on everything.


We do the same. It works as a great base for damn near any meat and holds seasonings/rubs well.
 
2021-04-10 10:10:19 PM  

scottydoesntknow: italie: I will put that shiat on everything meat until the day I die.

Which might be soon because I put that shiat on everything.

We do the same. It works as a great base for damn near any meat and holds seasonings/rubs well.


~knucks~
 
2021-04-10 10:34:08 PM  
I'll stick with my garum, thanks.
 
2021-04-10 10:39:12 PM  
oh myyyyyyyyy.

i just subscribed to that dude's channel.
 
2021-04-10 10:40:38 PM  
Love it. Had it tonight in my salad dressing.
 
2021-04-10 10:40:46 PM  
i don't think anyone who hasn't watched stoned hours upon hours of the real "how it's made" will find this funny, but i sure did.
 
2021-04-10 10:49:15 PM  
This thing

aaronequipment.comView Full Size


is a "Likwifier", an industrial-scale high-shear blender. Place the solids and some of the liquids in this thing, let it run for a bit, then pump the resulting slurry into another tank with the rest of the ingredients and agitate well until mixed.

Send the finished Worcestershire sauce to the bottling line.

You're welcome.
 
2021-04-10 11:02:37 PM  

italie: I will put that shiat on everything meat until the day I die.

Which might be soon because I put that shiat on everything.


I take my scrambled eggs black.
 
2021-04-10 11:04:57 PM  
As for the pronunciation, it's not wor-cester-shire sauce, it's worce-ster-shire sauce, often abbreviated to worce-ster sauce.

/Most aficionados just call it Raymond Luxury-Yacht, however.
 
2021-04-10 11:05:38 PM  

Dewey Fidalgo: The saddest thing of all is, when I looked up how it is actually made I found this:

Interestingly, the version of Lea & Perrins Worcestershire sauce sold in the U.S. differs from the U.K. recipe. It uses distilled white vinegar rather than malt vinegar. In addition, it has three times as much sugar and sodium. This makes the American version sweeter and saltier than the version sold in Britain and Canada.

We Americans really are farking barbarians.


Your basing that statement on a culinary data point???  You should get out more.
 
HFK [BareFark]
2021-04-10 11:09:00 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-04-10 11:10:10 PM  
thesuccessmanual.inView Full Size
 
2021-04-10 11:14:37 PM  
Still my favorite
How It's Unmade - Oreo Cookies
Youtube cJyGoGPXTj4
 
2021-04-10 11:21:35 PM  

luna1580: oh myyyyyyyyy.

i just subscribed to that dude's channel.


He's been a treat, yeah.
 
2021-04-10 11:43:40 PM  
My pops, who is East End cockney, pronounces it "whoo-stah" like Busta Rhymes might. It may be wrong, but I ain't care.
 
2021-04-10 11:48:09 PM  
I think everyone is glossing over the major point here.

It's small fish, rotted in barrels with salt, peppers, soy sauce for months and months. And then when the fish has fermented (you can tell when it stops bubbling). The rotted fish is pressed out for rotted fish liquid squeezins to go through further rotting procedures.

I like it.....but still it's fermented room temp fish squeezens. With salt....lots of salt.
 
2021-04-10 11:49:25 PM  

Dewey Fidalgo: The saddest thing of all is, when I looked up how it is actually made I found this:

Interestingly, the version of Lea & Perrins Worcestershire sauce sold in the U.S. differs from the U.K. recipe. It uses distilled white vinegar rather than malt vinegar. In addition, it has three times as much sugar and sodium. This makes the American version sweeter and saltier than the version sold in Britain and Canada.

We Americans really are farking barbarians.


Interesting.  It's the opposite with a number of other condiments that we've explored in both countries:  ketchup, jams, etc.
 
2021-04-10 11:56:50 PM  

HFK: [Fark user image 700x844]


I... on the one hand I really felt the need to reply other farkers in this thread.

but on t'other?

Fark user imageView Full Size


/fetch me my 40dN or something
 
2021-04-11 12:15:08 AM  

oldernell: Anchovies baby.


+1
 
2021-04-11 12:33:29 AM  
Well, that got lame in a hurry
 
2021-04-11 12:34:16 AM  
I just wish it was a syrup.
 
2021-04-11 2:28:12 AM  

Dewey Fidalgo: The saddest thing of all is, when I looked up how it is actually made I found this:

Interestingly, the version of Lea & Perrins Worcestershire sauce sold in the U.S. differs from the U.K. recipe. It uses distilled white vinegar rather than malt vinegar. In addition, it has three times as much sugar and sodium. This makes the American version sweeter and saltier than the version sold in Britain and Canada.

We Americans really are farking barbarians.


Three times as salty as in Britain sounds about right, actually.
 
2021-04-11 2:33:26 AM  
I love the stuff. As others have said it's great for all things meat, but I use it for much more. Sandwiches, in soups, on rice, straight up no chaser......
 
2021-04-11 7:08:52 AM  
The best synergy is a bloody mary with a pizza topped with anchovies and sprayed with it. I have a spray bottle filled with it. I used to clean my windows with vinegar until I found Worcestershire.
 
2021-04-11 7:14:27 AM  

optikeye: I think everyone is glossing over the major point here.

It's small fish, rotted in barrels with salt, peppers, soy sauce for months and months. And then when the fish has fermented (you can tell when it stops bubbling). The rotted fish is pressed out for rotted fish liquid squeezins to go through further rotting procedures.

I like it.....but still it's fermented room temp fish squeezens. With salt....lots of salt.


Your telling me that the British stole a Greek recipe to make MSG?
 
2021-04-11 7:52:14 AM  

G-Ride: I love the stuff. As others have said it's great for all things meat, but I use it for much more. Sandwiches, in soups, on rice, straight up no chaser......


It's a dirty little secret in Creole cooking as well. It adds a little bit of hearty depth of flavor and color.
 
2021-04-11 8:04:25 AM  
It's easy to pronounce: "Lea & Perrins."
 
2021-04-11 8:08:58 AM  
The rotted fish bits make my Chex Party mix addiction possible.  Yay Worcestershire sauce!

/The homemade kind, not that store bought utter garbage.
 
2021-04-11 9:07:09 AM  
It's "Wooster", subby.
 
2021-04-11 9:11:29 AM  

luna1580: oh myyyyyyyyy.

i just subscribed to that dude's channel.


Glutton for punishment?
 
2021-04-11 9:11:36 AM  

DirtyOM: optikeye: I think everyone is glossing over the major point here.

It's small fish, rotted in barrels with salt, peppers, soy sauce for months and months. And then when the fish has fermented (you can tell when it stops bubbling). The rotted fish is pressed out for rotted fish liquid squeezins to go through further rotting procedures.

I like it.....but still it's fermented room temp fish squeezens. With salt....lots of salt.

Your telling me that the British stole a Greek recipe to make MSG?


Roman, I think, but fermented fish squeezins are the source of many such savoury sauces.

My area produces this stuff:

Fark user imageView Full Size


Shottsuru is remarkably mild in flavour, considering it's produced from fermented fish, guts and all.
 
2021-04-11 9:13:45 AM  

aerojockey: Dewey Fidalgo: The saddest thing of all is, when I looked up how it is actually made I found this:

Interestingly, the version of Lea & Perrins Worcestershire sauce sold in the U.S. differs from the U.K. recipe. It uses distilled white vinegar rather than malt vinegar. In addition, it has three times as much sugar and sodium. This makes the American version sweeter and saltier than the version sold in Britain and Canada.

We Americans really are farking barbarians.

Three times as salty as in Britain sounds about right, actually.


Britons have Marmite to make up for it.
 
2021-04-11 9:16:11 AM  

Tyrone Slothrop: aerojockey: Dewey Fidalgo: The saddest thing of all is, when I looked up how it is actually made I found this:

Interestingly, the version of Lea & Perrins Worcestershire sauce sold in the U.S. differs from the U.K. recipe. It uses distilled white vinegar rather than malt vinegar. In addition, it has three times as much sugar and sodium. This makes the American version sweeter and saltier than the version sold in Britain and Canada.

We Americans really are farking barbarians.

Three times as salty as in Britain sounds about right, actually.

Britons have Marmite to make up for it.


I freaking love that stuff on toast and in sauces. I have to special-order it here, but it's worth the cost.
 
2021-04-11 9:48:40 AM  
img.maximummedia.ieView Full Size


The slightly taller feller ...
 
2021-04-11 9:50:11 AM  
Does not pair well with bananas however.
 
2021-04-11 9:50:52 AM  

ocelot: Does not pair well with bananas however.


You mean like fish sticks.
 
2021-04-11 10:00:15 AM  

gopher321: Attention Unfunny Video Producers: your video was unfunny.

I say that knowing full well my post is also unfunny...you're just more unfunny. Next time make an informative video instead of a sarcastic unfunny video.

That is all.

P.S. choke on a fermented sardine


I don't know the line "Other barrels contain anchovies. Why? Because god has abandoned us" was pretty funny.
 
2021-04-11 10:06:32 AM  

optikeye: I think everyone is glossing over the major point here.

It's small fish, rotted in barrels with salt, peppers, soy sauce for months and months. And then when the fish has fermented (you can tell when it stops bubbling). The rotted fish is pressed out for rotted fish liquid squeezins to go through further rotting procedures.

I like it.....but still it's fermented room temp fish squeezens. With salt....lots of salt.


IIRC (and I probably don't), it's not actually fermented. Instead, the fish undergo autolysis, where over time the enzymes and whatnot from their guts break down their flesh, which probably sounds grosser to most. Delicious.

/ Recently got the Noma Guide to Fermentation. I look forward to trying to make some of their garum recipes, but I'm still trying to figure out how to justify letting a vat of flesh rot somewhere in my house for 8 months... I think my family might have a problem with that.
 
2021-04-11 10:16:28 AM  

NOLAhd: G-Ride: I love the stuff. As others have said it's great for all things meat, but I use it for much more. Sandwiches, in soups, on rice, straight up no chaser......

It's a dirty little secret in Creole cooking as well. It adds a little bit of hearty depth of flavor and color.


Yep.  I still pronounce it Lee & Perrains, because my grandmother always did, with her south Louisiana Cajun French lilt.
 
2021-04-11 10:17:26 AM  

Dewey Fidalgo: The saddest thing of all is, when I looked up how it is actually made I found this:

Interestingly, the version of Lea & Perrins Worcestershire sauce sold in the U.S. differs from the U.K. recipe. It uses distilled white vinegar rather than malt vinegar. In addition, it has three times as much sugar and sodium. This makes the American version sweeter and saltier than the version sold in Britain and Canada.

We Americans really are farking barbarians.


What wrong with knowing your target markets?

Majority of Americans love lots of salt and sugar.

Look at all the heniz condiments out now.

And when I cook I tend to use worcestershire quite a bit on a lot of dishes.

What sucks is when you have a different brand sticker, and it doesn't have the reducer on the lip of the bottle, all of a sudden "SURPRISE WORCESTERSHIRE FLOOD"

it's happened. Some marketer/ engineer/ packaging developer is a real asshole for designing it that way.
 
2021-04-11 10:58:56 AM  

Dewey Fidalgo: The saddest thing of all is, when I looked up how it is actually made I found this:

Interestingly, the version of Lea & Perrins Worcestershire sauce sold in the U.S. differs from the U.K. recipe. It uses distilled white vinegar rather than malt vinegar. In addition, it has three times as much sugar and sodium. This makes the American version sweeter and saltier than the version sold in Britain and Canada.

We Americans really are farking barbarians.


Great.  Now I may have to start importing it.  I doubt the fish sauces I get from Asian markets are any better.
 
2021-04-11 11:05:39 AM  

Metaluna Mutant: NOLAhd: G-Ride: I love the stuff. As others have said it's great for all things meat, but I use it for much more. Sandwiches, in soups, on rice, straight up no chaser......

It's a dirty little secret in Creole cooking as well. It adds a little bit of hearty depth of flavor and color.

Yep.  I still pronounce it Lee & Perrains, because my grandmother always did, with her south Louisiana Cajun French lilt.


That was how I always heard Justin Wilson pronounce it..."I garantee".
 
2021-04-11 11:10:58 AM  
Looks like the same process for nuoc mam
 
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