Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(NASA)   High: -8: Low: -117. Chance of precipitation: 0%. That's your live weather report from Isidus Planitia, and we'll be back with the traffic after these messages   (mars.nasa.gov) divider line
    More: Cool, Mars, Climate, Sun, Mars Environmental Dynamics Analyzer, Atmospheric pressure, particular sol, Atmosphere, atmospheric pressure  
•       •       •

856 clicks; posted to STEM » on 10 Apr 2021 at 8:41 PM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



13 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-04-10 8:51:30 PM  
Sounds Great

Fark user imageView Full Size


/ Who's going to feast on Earth's sky and drink their rivers dry?
// Who's going to stomp their mountains into fine Martian dust?
/// I can't hear you!
 
2021-04-10 9:12:01 PM  
That's too cold for me.
 
2021-04-10 9:12:43 PM  
So North Dakota in January?
 
2021-04-10 9:46:03 PM  
It's rush hour! It appears that there's a disabled rover on the 405 but traffic appears to be moving smoothly in the left lane.  As a matter of fact, there is no other traffic.
 
2021-04-10 9:50:31 PM  
"If you look up tonight, you'll find the blue, Lesser Evening Star right after sunset."
 
2021-04-10 10:08:34 PM  
Still waiting for the traffic report from the eye-in-the-sky chopper.
 
2021-04-10 10:18:04 PM  
Slow ass motherfarker on the interstate.  one of those autopilot cars too.  farking Elon Musk
 
2021-04-10 10:53:53 PM  

Insult Comic Bishounen: So North Dakota in January?


Sure, except for the deadly radiation and blood-boiling atmospheric pressure.
 
2021-04-10 11:33:24 PM  
I realize it's just a PR site for a curious public, and actual scientists have their own meteorological data to analyze, but I still think it's disappointing that NASA still uses Imperial units like Fahrenheit. I guess atmospheric pressure is given in Pa, so that's something.
 
2021-04-10 11:50:43 PM  

Fabric_Man: I realize it's just a PR site for a curious public, and actual scientists have their own meteorological data to analyze, but I still think it's disappointing that NASA still uses Imperial units like Fahrenheit. I guess atmospheric pressure is given in Pa, so that's something.


I wonder if there's any raw data with a time stamp because I'm fairly confident that the pressure rises and falls are due more to local temperature variation than any kind of real synoptic scale motion.  A graph of both over time would be ideal for analysis.
 
2021-04-11 1:15:06 AM  

WeatherNerd: Fabric_Man: I realize it's just a PR site for a curious public, and actual scientists have their own meteorological data to analyze, but I still think it's disappointing that NASA still uses Imperial units like Fahrenheit. I guess atmospheric pressure is given in Pa, so that's something.

I wonder if there's any raw data with a time stamp because I'm fairly confident that the pressure rises and falls are due more to local temperature variation than any kind of real synoptic scale motion.  A graph of both over time would be ideal for analysis.


Would love to see the real data too. I suspect the pressure variation may pass through the phase boundary for water with implications for where water will be found. But I would bet against you on large scale motion. Orbiter images over the past year shows a diurnal cloud formation at the scale of hundreds of km drifting even further. Additionally several images of local clouds by different rovers. Finally, global dust storms sorta imply a global weather system.
 
2021-04-11 2:04:03 AM  

Fabric_Man: but I still think it's disappointing that NASA still uses Imperial units like Fahrenheit


what a travesty
 
2021-04-11 7:36:12 AM  

Fabric_Man: I realize it's just a PR site for a curious public, and actual scientists have their own meteorological data to analyze, but I still think it's disappointing that NASA still uses Imperial units like Fahrenheit. I guess atmospheric pressure is given in Pa, so that's something.


You can toggle to Celsius just by clicking on the temperature...
 
Displayed 13 of 13 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.