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(Phys Org2)   Topology created by a large spin-orbit coupling of uranium-cobalt-aluminum doped with ruthenium resulted in a colossal anomalous Nernst conductivity. Know what I mean, Vern?   (phys.org) divider line
    More: Interesting, Radioactive decay, Periodic table, Radioisotope thermoelectric generator, Transition metal, Thermodynamics, magnetic uranium compound, material's topology, system of uranium-cobalt-aluminum  
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629 clicks; posted to STEM » on 27 Mar 2021 at 6:59 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



20 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-03-27 2:45:25 PM  
y.yarn.coView Full Size
 
2021-03-27 3:02:14 PM  
Well, that's what I have been saying the whole time!
 
2021-03-27 3:24:09 PM  
In other words, after reading the article:

Dead Or Alive - You Spin Me Round (Like a Record) (Official Video)
Youtube PGNiXGX2nLU


Spin coupling FTW
 
2021-03-27 4:59:04 PM  
Nerd talk on Fark?  Booooring!!!
 
2021-03-27 5:29:09 PM  
Those are words, I presume.
 
2021-03-27 7:08:56 PM  
I designed a fusion reactor and even I found that article challenging to digest
 
2021-03-27 7:10:27 PM  
I'd say that deserves the "spiffy" tag.
 
2021-03-27 7:17:14 PM  
Richard Spaven | 'Spin'
Youtube mjK2r1sAktw
 
2021-03-27 7:21:42 PM  
Well of course it did, what did you expect, chipmunks?
 
2021-03-27 7:22:54 PM  
IU googled Nernst conductivity and ended up reading (I say that advisedly) this

We performed first-principles simulations to elucidate the transverse thermoelectric effect (anomalous Nernst effect) of the half-metallic FeCl2 monolayer. We analyzed its thermoelectricity based on the semiclassical transport theory including the effect of Berry curvature and found that carrier-doping induced a large anomalous Nernst effect that was ∼6.65 μV/K at 100 K if we assumed 10 fs for the relaxation time. This magnitude originates in a large Berry curvature at the K-point of a hexagonal Brillouin zone. These results suggest that two-dimensional ferromagnetic half-metallic materials can potentially be used in thermoelectric devices.I think it trumps your article Subby
 
2021-03-27 8:42:57 PM  
I'm a card carrying physicist and I can't read these mathematical physics articles.  How do they get greened by Fark?
 
2021-03-27 8:53:22 PM  
Nernst! What did I tell you about your lunch!
 
2021-03-27 9:31:01 PM  
What this means:

Your air conditioner uses electricity to make one side hot and the other side cold. You can also do the opposite: take something that is hot on one side and cold on the other side and convert that temperature difference back into electricity. This allows you to make a type of solar panel where the heat from the Sun warming up one side of the panel generates electricity for you, as the electrons essentially flee from one side to the other.

Scientists have discovered a new substance that has a lot of fleeing electrons milling about. This is really good because you can make a really nice solar panel out of that; and it generates a lot more electricity than previous solar panels made out of different substances.

It's also points us in a new direction for future discoveries: if we can find out why the substance has so many extra milling about electrons, we can use that information to try to create a new metal alloy that has even more milling about electrons, and make even better solar panels.
 
2021-03-27 9:33:29 PM  
Authentic Physics Gibberish.
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-03-27 10:36:53 PM  

stuhayes2010: I'm a card carrying physicist and I can't read these mathematical physics articles.  How do they get greened by Fark?


Vern and Ernst joke. Pop culture reference from the childhood of Gen X, juxtaposed with really dense jargon. Doesn't mean subby knew what it meant, some phys.org articles are really good, most of them from China are completely outside of the comprehension of ordinary people and the rest just talk about the circumstances of the discovery in question without talking about the discovery itself, possibly because the person writing it doesn't understand it themselves.
 
2021-03-27 10:45:43 PM  
I would actually rate this article in the top quarter of physics or materials science articles on that website. I have enough chemistry understanding to follow along with the concepts, though the only time topology came up in any class was upper division geography at university.
 
2021-03-28 11:35:06 AM  

Sim Tree: What this means:

Your air conditioner uses electricity to make one side hot and the other side cold. You can also do the opposite: take something that is hot on one side and cold on the other side and convert that temperature difference back into electricity. This allows you to make a type of solar panel where the heat from the Sun warming up one side of the panel generates electricity for you, as the electrons essentially flee from one side to the other.

Scientists have discovered a new substance that has a lot of fleeing electrons milling about. This is really good because you can make a really nice solar panel out of that; and it generates a lot more electricity than previous solar panels made out of different substances.

It's also points us in a new direction for future discoveries: if we can find out why the substance has so many extra milling about electrons, we can use that information to try to create a new metal alloy that has even more milling about electrons, and make even better solar panels.


But considering these materials are at the bottom of the periodic table what are the risks of extended material problems?
 
2021-03-28 12:11:31 PM  

Bio-nic: Sim Tree: What this means:

Your air conditioner uses electricity to make one side hot and the other side cold. You can also do the opposite: take something that is hot on one side and cold on the other side and convert that temperature difference back into electricity. This allows you to make a type of solar panel where the heat from the Sun warming up one side of the panel generates electricity for you, as the electrons essentially flee from one side to the other.

Scientists have discovered a new substance that has a lot of fleeing electrons milling about. This is really good because you can make a really nice solar panel out of that; and it generates a lot more electricity than previous solar panels made out of different substances.

It's also points us in a new direction for future discoveries: if we can find out why the substance has so many extra milling about electrons, we can use that information to try to create a new metal alloy that has even more milling about electrons, and make even better solar panels.

But considering these materials are at the bottom of the periodic table what are the risks of extended material problems?


Well if we can figure out the particulars of how the topology has this effect, we can replicate it in different alloys. The laboratory prototype may use exotic materials, but once we get the hang of it, we might be able to mass produce it at scale using completely different materials that have the same effects.
 
2021-03-28 7:06:33 PM  
Did they use prefabulated amulite?
 
2021-03-28 8:18:48 PM  

Priapetic: Did they use prefabulated amulite?


Of course not, there's not enough fringallor adjoining westlers.
 
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