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(Some DM)   Stay-at-home mom tries teaching an online D&D class as a side hustle, rolls a natural 20   (grow.acorns.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Investment, Dungeons & Dragons, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, Money, platform offering classes, Megan Hardy, Acorns Advisers, Role-playing game  
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1280 clicks; posted to Fandom » and Main » on 17 Mar 2021 at 8:35 AM (8 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



35 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-03-17 8:57:02 AM  
Intro?  I'm sure most of them will flunk out once they get to Advanced Dungeons and Dragons.
 
2021-03-17 9:07:20 AM  
As someone who has done pen and paper rpgs for over 20 years... What exactly is she teaching?

And weirder who is paying for lessons on how to play these?

Reading the article didn't help explain.
 
2021-03-17 9:12:50 AM  

Quantumbunny: As someone who has done pen and paper rpgs for over 20 years... What exactly is she teaching?

And weirder who is paying for lessons on how to play these?


A year of lockdown = EXTREME boredom
 
2021-03-17 9:16:30 AM  

Quantumbunny: As someone who has done pen and paper rpgs for over 20 years... What exactly is she teaching?

And weirder who is paying for lessons on how to play these?

Reading the article didn't help explain.


It appears to be mostly kids based on the article. Probably looking for some kind of social outlet that could be done remotely but maybe one that they weren't familiar with. Which isn't too surprising as far as pandemic proof industries go, D&D business grew from adults looking for the same thing.

Based on the article once they got into it, many were paying just to keep playing with the same groups they were in. Not sure why they couldn't arrange that offline but if they were having fun and enjoyed her as a GM than win-win all around I guess.
 
2021-03-17 9:16:34 AM  

Quantumbunny: As someone who has done pen and paper rpgs for over 20 years... What exactly is she teaching?

And weirder who is paying for lessons on how to play these?

Reading the article didn't help explain.


Professional DM is now a thing now that virtual tabletop sites/applications are popular like Roll20, D&D Beyond, Tabletop Simulator, and Fantasy Grounds. Combine that Discord and PayPal/etc and you can set yourself up pretty well.

The virtual tabletop sites allow you create maps with buildings, sound effects, and tokens so that everyone can see what happens. The Virtual tabletop site can also track rolls and statuses like health and spells, so all a player needs to do is say what they want to to do and tell the site to roll the correct dice.

With all of that, you could easily make a teaching module to show people how to play the game.

The best of the professional DMs usually charge about $60/session, which comes out to $20 or less per hour.

My housemate and I were thinking about hiring one for my wife's birthday so that she could have a one-off module with friends and family and she could be the focus of the module.
 
2021-03-17 9:20:21 AM  

Quantumbunny: As someone who has done pen and paper rpgs for over 20 years... What exactly is she teaching?

And weirder who is paying for lessons on how to play these?

Reading the article didn't help explain.


She's DMing intro adventures. FTFA:

"I have my Fun Adventure class, which is like my primary intro to Dungeons & Dragons," she says. It's "a six-week campaign that's probably my biggest and most popular."

Hardest part of D&D is getting a group. It's not unheard of to pay for a DM since there are less DMs than PCs in general. If you're a beginner and don't know a group signing up for a remote group isn't that crazy. My guess is that it's probably a campaign that can be done in around 3-4 sessions, but she stretches it out by tutorializing what is going on so people understand better. "Ok PSteven the rogue, played by Steven, you're about to unlock the treasure chest, but maybe you should consider a perception check for traps before you go straight to disarming..."
 
2021-03-17 9:27:49 AM  

Klivian: Quantumbunny: As someone who has done pen and paper rpgs for over 20 years... What exactly is she teaching?

And weirder who is paying for lessons on how to play these?

Reading the article didn't help explain.

She's DMing intro adventures. FTFA:

"I have my Fun Adventure class, which is like my primary intro to Dungeons & Dragons," she says. It's "a six-week campaign that's probably my biggest and most popular."

Hardest part of D&D is getting a group. It's not unheard of to pay for a DM since there are less DMs than PCs in general. If you're a beginner and don't know a group signing up for a remote group isn't that crazy. My guess is that it's probably a campaign that can be done in around 3-4 sessions, but she stretches it out by tutorializing what is going on so people understand better. "Ok PSteven the rogue, played by Steven, you're about to unlock the treasure chest, but maybe you should consider a perception check for traps before you go straight to disarming..."


DM'ing takes some effort, creativity and charisma.  So, if you don't have that talent and charisma (or even if you do,) you can teach, and monetize it to people who are insecure about finding and fitting into a group.  It's genius really.
 
2021-03-17 9:43:45 AM  

Ker_Thwap: DM'ing takes some effort, creativity and charisma.  So, if you don't have that talent and charisma (or even if you do,) you can teach, and monetize it to people who are insecure about finding and fitting into a group.  It's genius really.


Being a PC requires creativity and charisma as well. Every single DND player would receive a tremendous benefit from an improv class or two. Lots of introverts play DND but never really come out of their shell due to fear of ridicule. An intro class that emphasizes being vulnerable and going with the flow should be mandatory before starting a DND campaign.

Back in the before times when I ran a game it always turned just a bit sillier than most campaigns because I would be willing to say "Sure, give it a shot" whenever a player came up with an idea, no matter how silly. It would be on me to figure out what benefit a player should get for dropping their pants and mooning an enemy in combat, or handling the reaction of an NPC to a player saying something wild, but I would never just shut down what they said.
 
2021-03-17 9:51:53 AM  

Klivian: Ker_Thwap: DM'ing takes some effort, creativity and charisma.  So, if you don't have that talent and charisma (or even if you do,) you can teach, and monetize it to people who are insecure about finding and fitting into a group.  It's genius really.

Being a PC requires creativity and charisma as well. Every single DND player would receive a tremendous benefit from an improv class or two. Lots of introverts play DND but never really come out of their shell due to fear of ridicule. An intro class that emphasizes being vulnerable and going with the flow should be mandatory before starting a DND campaign.

Back in the before times when I ran a game it always turned just a bit sillier than most campaigns because I would be willing to say "Sure, give it a shot" whenever a player came up with an idea, no matter how silly. It would be on me to figure out what benefit a player should get for dropping their pants and mooning an enemy in combat, or handling the reaction of an NPC to a player saying something wild, but I would never just shut down what they said.


I played a few times in the early 80s, and it went exactly as you described.  A few young folks sitting around too embarrassed to roll with it.
 
2021-03-17 10:03:37 AM  
Today on House Hunters: he's an out of work park worker, she teaches D&D online.  Budget: $1,200,000
 
2021-03-17 10:09:28 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-03-17 10:41:21 AM  

SirDigbyChickenCaesar: Today on House Hunters: he's an out of work park worker, she teaches D&D online.  Budget: $1,200,000


Is that a budget for a house or a Space Marine army?
 
2021-03-17 10:48:21 AM  

UNC_Samurai: SirDigbyChickenCaesar: Today on House Hunters: he's an out of work park worker, she teaches D&D online.  Budget: $1,200,000

Is that a budget for a house or a Space Marine army?


Yes.
 
2021-03-17 10:53:48 AM  

Quantumbunny: As someone who has done pen and paper rpgs for over 20 years... What exactly is she teaching?

And weirder who is paying for lessons on how to play these?

Reading the article didn't help explain.


as a long-time table top gamer I finally downloaded the basic D&D rules and found them very confusing to work though especially the character building section. they aren't laid out very well and it would be handy to have someone who knows how it is supposed to work to fill in the gaps/answer questions.
 
2021-03-17 10:56:09 AM  

tom baker's scarf: Quantumbunny: As someone who has done pen and paper rpgs for over 20 years... What exactly is she teaching?

And weirder who is paying for lessons on how to play these?

Reading the article didn't help explain.

as a long-time table top gamer I finally downloaded the basic D&D rules and found them very confusing to work though especially the character building section. they aren't laid out very well and it would be handy to have someone who knows how it is supposed to work to fill in the gaps/answer questions.


I am totally willing to be a resource for you, ask me anything you want. EIP.
 
2021-03-17 11:06:51 AM  

Ker_Thwap: Klivian: Ker_Thwap: DM'ing takes some effort, creativity and charisma.  So, if you don't have that talent and charisma (or even if you do,) you can teach, and monetize it to people who are insecure about finding and fitting into a group.  It's genius really.

Being a PC requires creativity and charisma as well. Every single DND player would receive a tremendous benefit from an improv class or two. Lots of introverts play DND but never really come out of their shell due to fear of ridicule. An intro class that emphasizes being vulnerable and going with the flow should be mandatory before starting a DND campaign.

Back in the before times when I ran a game it always turned just a bit sillier than most campaigns because I would be willing to say "Sure, give it a shot" whenever a player came up with an idea, no matter how silly. It would be on me to figure out what benefit a player should get for dropping their pants and mooning an enemy in combat, or handling the reaction of an NPC to a player saying something wild, but I would never just shut down what they said.

I played a few times in the early 80s, and it went exactly as you described.  A few young folks sitting around too embarrassed to roll with it.


Fark user imageView Full Size

That's because when you really go headlong into it, you end up getting canceled.
 
2021-03-17 11:12:46 AM  
One of the big things that got me into D&D as a kid was a summer school "class." Some dude took over a room in the local junior high and ran the original Dragonlance modules for a couple of hours a day during the week for six weeks. I was Raistlin.

Sounds like this lady found a modern version and she's cashing in. Good for her.
 
2021-03-17 11:13:55 AM  

Klivian: tom baker's scarf: Quantumbunny: As someone who has done pen and paper rpgs for over 20 years... What exactly is she teaching?

And weirder who is paying for lessons on how to play these?

Reading the article didn't help explain.

as a long-time table top gamer I finally downloaded the basic D&D rules and found them very confusing to work though especially the character building section. they aren't laid out very well and it would be handy to have someone who knows how it is supposed to work to fill in the gaps/answer questions.

I am totally willing to be a resource for you, ask me anything you want. EIP.


cool thanks.
 
2021-03-17 11:17:13 AM  
D&D in the 1980s
Parents: We don't want Johnny playing that demon-summoning game. Best throw away his books and not let him play with those friends.

D&D in the 2020s
Parents: Here's my credit card Johnny. Go pay someone to play D&D with you.
 
2021-03-17 11:24:09 AM  

Quantumbunny: As someone who has done pen and paper rpgs for over 20 years... What exactly is she teaching?

And weirder who is paying for lessons on how to play these?

Reading the article didn't help explain.


I've been playing D&D since the AD&D days.  I can't imagine how someone would learn if they didn't already have friends that were really knowledgeable in the game.  I am teaching my three sons how to play and am finding out just how complex it can be for a new player.
 
2021-03-17 11:25:44 AM  

UNC_Samurai: SirDigbyChickenCaesar: Today on House Hunters: he's an out of work park worker, she teaches D&D online.  Budget: $1,200,000

Is that a budget for a house or a Space Marine army?


They're in the market for a fallout shelter.
 
2021-03-17 11:54:56 AM  

SirDigbyChickenCaesar: Quantumbunny: As someone who has done pen and paper rpgs for over 20 years... What exactly is she teaching?

And weirder who is paying for lessons on how to play these?

Reading the article didn't help explain.

I've been playing D&D since the AD&D days.  I can't imagine how someone would learn if they didn't already have friends that were really knowledgeable in the game.  I am teaching my three sons how to play and am finding out just how complex it can be for a new player.


It didn't used to be that complex.

Remember it was once fighter, wizard, cleric, thief (with paladin added as a sub-class). And that was it. There were also only humans, elves, and dwarves. Halflings and half-elves arrived later. Very few weapons. No feats or proficiencies. Remember the weird saving throw tables? Recall the Vancian magic system?
 
2021-03-17 11:55:26 AM  

SirDigbyChickenCaesar: Quantumbunny: As someone who has done pen and paper rpgs for over 20 years... What exactly is she teaching?

And weirder who is paying for lessons on how to play these?

Reading the article didn't help explain.

I've been playing D&D since the AD&D days.  I can't imagine how someone would learn if they didn't already have friends that were really knowledgeable in the game.  I am teaching my three sons how to play and am finding out just how complex it can be for a new player.


If you start from scratch, it's actually much easier. Back in the Before Times, I would teach D&D to kids and adults at the local game shop on a weekly basis. 5e is the easiest system I've seen to teach, but also extremely detailed if you want it. The starter kits on sale at bookstore, Walmart, Target, and even Meijer are really helpful. If you don't want to spend money and you don't mind reading, the free SRD is a great place to start as well.

If any of y'all want help, feel free to contact me (email or facebook).
 
2021-03-17 11:57:47 AM  

tom baker's scarf: Quantumbunny: As someone who has done pen and paper rpgs for over 20 years... What exactly is she teaching?

And weirder who is paying for lessons on how to play these?

Reading the article didn't help explain.

as a long-time table top gamer I finally downloaded the basic D&D rules and found them very confusing to work though especially the character building section. they aren't laid out very well and it would be handy to have someone who knows how it is supposed to work to fill in the gaps/answer questions.


One has to start somewhere, but I will say that I feel like the current system is backwards. Stats, then race and finally class at the end. That was fine in the old "roll 3D6 six times and see what you can make of it" days, but now? You should start with the class, IMO, and then work towards it.

Obviously old hands know what to do but I think its an issue for newbs.
 
2021-03-17 12:19:33 PM  

JammerJim: tom baker's scarf: Quantumbunny: As someone who has done pen and paper rpgs for over 20 years... What exactly is she teaching?

And weirder who is paying for lessons on how to play these?

Reading the article didn't help explain.

as a long-time table top gamer I finally downloaded the basic D&D rules and found them very confusing to work though especially the character building section. they aren't laid out very well and it would be handy to have someone who knows how it is supposed to work to fill in the gaps/answer questions.

One has to start somewhere, but I will say that I feel like the current system is backwards. Stats, then race and finally class at the end. That was fine in the old "roll 3D6 six times and see what you can make of it" days, but now? You should start with the class, IMO, and then work towards it.

Obviously old hands know what to do but I think its an issue for newbs.


Depends on how you want to build the character I guess.  Class first is basically you know what you want to do, and optimize for that, and is a bit towards the min-max mindset.  Points/race first allows you to make the personality and then lead into the class.

Like you want to be an intelligent narcissist.  So max int and dump charisma.  A background that further explores that.  By the time you hit class if you read their little blurbs you would avoid all the charisma classes, so that drops bard, paladin, sorc, and warlock, and heavily lean towards wizard.

I feel like establishing who you are is better than what you are in role playing, but I get both viewpoints.
 
2021-03-17 12:36:17 PM  
I'd rather pay someone to teach my kid hands on paper mechanics instead of these weirdos who pay for their kids to get lessons in counter strike or fortnite....
 
2021-03-17 12:48:50 PM  

hammer85: Like you want to be an intelligent narcissist.  So max int and dump charisma.


pbs.twimg.comView Full Size

Instructions unclear: created Donald Trump.
 
2021-03-17 1:14:25 PM  

madgonad: SirDigbyChickenCaesar: Quantumbunny: As someone who has done pen and paper rpgs for over 20 years... What exactly is she teaching?

And weirder who is paying for lessons on how to play these?

Reading the article didn't help explain.

I've been playing D&D since the AD&D days.  I can't imagine how someone would learn if they didn't already have friends that were really knowledgeable in the game.  I am teaching my three sons how to play and am finding out just how complex it can be for a new player.

It didn't used to be that complex.

Remember it was once fighter, wizard, cleric, thief (with paladin added as a sub-class). And that was it. There were also only humans, elves, and dwarves. Halflings and half-elves arrived later. Very few weapons. No feats or proficiencies. Remember the weird saving throw tables? Recall the Vancian magic system?


I recall learning THACO helped me learn algebra and formulas in school.   Being able to determine the THACO for a level 13 bard did not help me get any dates though.
 
2021-03-17 1:51:28 PM  
Looks like she's -2 on saving throws vs spawning.
 
2021-03-17 2:17:12 PM  

hammer85: JammerJim: tom baker's scarf: Quantumbunny: As someone who has done pen and paper rpgs for over 20 years... What exactly is she teaching?

And weirder who is paying for lessons on how to play these?

Reading the article didn't help explain.

as a long-time table top gamer I finally downloaded the basic D&D rules and found them very confusing to work though especially the character building section. they aren't laid out very well and it would be handy to have someone who knows how it is supposed to work to fill in the gaps/answer questions.

One has to start somewhere, but I will say that I feel like the current system is backwards. Stats, then race and finally class at the end. That was fine in the old "roll 3D6 six times and see what you can make of it" days, but now? You should start with the class, IMO, and then work towards it.

Obviously old hands know what to do but I think its an issue for newbs.

Depends on how you want to build the character I guess.  Class first is basically you know what you want to do, and optimize for that, and is a bit towards the min-max mindset.  Points/race first allows you to make the personality and then lead into the class.

Like you want to be an intelligent narcissist.  So max int and dump charisma.  A background that further explores that.  By the time you hit class if you read their little blurbs you would avoid all the charisma classes, so that drops bard, paladin, sorc, and warlock, and heavily lean towards wizard.

I feel like establishing who you are is better than what you are in role playing, but I get both viewpoints.


That works if you're building a party of kumbaya friends going on an adventure. But unless you're all hiring other classes or the DM is filling in the gaps with NPCs, personality first is problematic.

Class first to get a balanced party makes a lot of sense, even casual. Otherwise you are forcing a lot of other work either onto the GM/DM or onto the party prior to every excursion.

Maybe that sounds min/maxy to you, but really it's more about making sure you don't have 3 wizards and a bard setting off. You can build basically any personality into your character after you know what class you need and what stats back that at a high level (Meaning you can't play Wizard with 10 Int. You won't get any spells, for example).

I guess I had assumed once character builders came out, most of the pain of understanding rules and character building became less important. Do first timers mostly build by hand? That would be problematic.
 
2021-03-17 4:06:21 PM  

Aggressively Mellow: I recall learning THACO helped me learn algebra and formulas in school.   Being able to determine the THACO for a level 13 bard did not help me get any dates though.


No, but being a person that would listen to a woman and loved storytelling and a bit of role playing is likely to attract lots of women.

/just don't take out your wizard hat in public
 
2021-03-17 8:02:50 PM  

madgonad: Aggressively Mellow: I recall learning THACO helped me learn algebra and formulas in school.   Being able to determine the THACO for a level 13 bard did not help me get any dates though.

No, but being a person that would listen to a woman and loved storytelling and a bit of role playing is likely to attract lots of women.

/just don't take out your wizard hat in public


It certainly helped me land my amazing nerdy wife.  And left me as the forever DM since late 2E

/I never took out my wizard hat with out having a cloak too.
//Always open to give out advice to new DMs
 
2021-03-17 8:33:45 PM  

SPARC Pile: Quantumbunny: As someone who has done pen and paper rpgs for over 20 years... What exactly is she teaching?

And weirder who is paying for lessons on how to play these?

Reading the article didn't help explain.

Professional DM is now a thing now that virtual tabletop sites/applications are popular like Roll20, D&D Beyond, Tabletop Simulator, and Fantasy Grounds. Combine that Discord and PayPal/etc and you can set yourself up pretty well.

The virtual tabletop sites allow you create maps with buildings, sound effects, and tokens so that everyone can see what happens. The Virtual tabletop site can also track rolls and statuses like health and spells, so all a player needs to do is say what they want to to do and tell the site to roll the correct dice.

With all of that, you could easily make a teaching module to show people how to play the game.

The best of the professional DMs usually charge about $60/session, which comes out to $20 or less per hour.

My housemate and I were thinking about hiring one for my wife's birthday so that she could have a one-off module with friends and family and she could be the focus of the module.


Awww, that would be an awesome gift.
 
2021-03-18 12:28:43 AM  
I have a friend who does some online DM'ing for a small group of kids.  He sends me the occasional campaign update when he's pleased with a session, or when he incorporates some element of nostalgia from our own D&D days.

He seems to be having a blast with it, although I'm pretty sure it's non-profit.
 
2021-03-18 8:09:24 AM  
I attack the darkness. *roll for initiative*
 
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