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(Guardian)   Reading books to your children enriches everyones lives   (theguardian.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Reading, Goodnight Moon, American picture book, Books, Dyslexia, E-book, books, first real purchase  
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157 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 07 Mar 2021 at 6:35 AM (10 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-03-07 7:09:59 AM  
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2021-03-07 9:00:41 AM  
Always read to my kids and they wound up becoming voracious readers. First grownup book I read to my daughter when she was 6 was The Hobbit. I edited some of the scarier and more boring parts to make it easier on her but she didn't not and loved it. About 6 months later she asked me to read it again. I started including more of why I had excised. By the time she was 8 she was reading it on her own. She went in to read TLOTR and then sci-fi and fantasy novels. Before she hit junior high I got her reading Huck Finn, 1984, Fahrenheit 451 and other books. When she wanted to learn more about the causes of the world wars I pointed her to some historical analyses. I also taught both her and her brother to never just trust one source of information but to always seek out multiple sources so they can get more objective and balanced accounts and be better able to make informed decisions and opinions.

Read to your kids. They will thank you for it and the world will have another discerning and citizen.
 
2021-03-07 9:11:05 AM  
I read to my child every night at bedtime. They may not understand the words, but the look of sheer joy on that little face while I read is priceless.
 
2021-03-07 10:43:53 AM  
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2021-03-07 12:23:24 PM  
I now know more about dinosaurs than I did before kiddo came along. Paleontology has progressed significantly since I was a kid.
 
2021-03-07 12:45:59 PM  
We always read the kiddo before bedtime. Goodnight Moon, Three Little Ducks (with voices for the ducks), etc. Great times. No matter how tired I was with working full time and taking engineering course at night, I always enjoyed reading to her. As she got older, we would take turns reading pages. We did that until she was reading on her own at age four. One of the saddest days was when she told me that she didn't need me to read any more.
 
2021-03-07 12:50:09 PM  
Except Dr.Seuss.
 
2021-03-07 12:50:10 PM  
Currently reading The Hobbit to my 7-and 2-year-olds. The 2 year old nods off in the first five minutes, the 7 year old says she loves it but doesn't retain any of the story so far. I'm enjoying the hell out of it, though. Hoping to indoctrinate them into high fantasy in the coming years...biding my time until we get to the Earthsea Cycle and Lon-Tobyn Chronicles...
 
2021-03-07 1:02:41 PM  
Pediatrician said read to the kid every day.
Library staffer laughed at me, saying "she's gonna read that?" when I checked out a stack of kid's books.
Just started buying books from the discount stores.
 
2021-03-07 1:27:59 PM  
Pnd Jr is on the young side when it comes to cutoff dates for starting school. in other words he is one of the youngest in his class/year They wanted to test him for preppy k. During testing the teacher opened up the book and turned to the first page of the story and asked him.."where do you start reading?" She wanted him to point to the upper left hand corner. He turned the page back one and stated "the title page" She was blown away.

/he was also asked what dim meant in "the lightbulb is dim" -- How can a lightbulb be not smart.....
//not sure he's mine
///3
 
2021-03-07 2:22:49 PM  
I learned to read early, don't have early childhood memories of being read to, except Bible study.

But when I was about 5th or 6th grade, my dad did a second job for a few months and got home at 10pm. He started reading a book to me. I didn't say "I'm too old to be read to," I thought it was kind of him to deliberately make that connection, while he was gone so much.

Looking back, not just reading that book at that time, my father placed a lot of value on books. That in itself left a good impression.
 
2021-03-07 5:15:33 PM  
Love of reading begets itself.
Long story short, I'm visiting my mother in the company of my oldest daughter. We spend all evening catching up and telling stories. The next day, as my daughter told her mother, we spent the day like Spldngs. "Nana's on her couch with her book and I'm in her bed with my book and Dad's in the TV room with something from Nana's bookcase and we all read all day."
 
2021-03-07 7:23:45 PM  
I'm just going to write that there a lot of awesome parents in this thread, and it's actually making me tear up (more than...) a little

/ I remember my mother reading a Pratchett book - Hogfather, I think - to me and my siblings, and choking when she hit Susan Sto Helit's description of having an education and becoming a teacher: (paraphrased) "like getting a sexually transmitted disease and then having the urge to pass it on"
// It's stupid, but my fantasies about having a family have been, when they're not about being good enough to have a family in the first place, about things like reading to my children
/// I guess I'd want to be a "present" father..? My own father was kind of an anti-role model
 
2021-03-07 7:58:51 PM  

ReluctantLondon: I'm just going to write that there a lot of awesome parents in this thread, and it's actually making me tear up (more than...) a little

/ I remember my mother reading a Pratchett book - Hogfather, I think - to me and my siblings, and choking when she hit Susan Sto Helit's description of having an education and becoming a teacher: (paraphrased) "like getting a sexually transmitted disease and then having the urge to pass it on"
// It's stupid, but my fantasies about having a family have been, when they're not about being good enough to have a family in the first place, about things like reading to my children
/// I guess I'd want to be a "present" father..? My own father was kind of an anti-role model


Your fantasies aren't stupid. And trust me, you're not alone in your feelings about being good enough. I don't know if that feeling ever goes away, even when your kid(s) gets older. That bar is constantly moving up. At least it is for me with my first, who's only a few months old.

Do you have books that you look forward to sharing? I know for me, I have collected many picture books like the Velveteen Rabbit and a few other classics to start (this was well before my child was born). I'm still thinking about what other books I'll share as they get older.
 
2021-03-07 8:43:50 PM  

Wendigogo: ReluctantLondon: I'm just going to write that there a lot of awesome parents in this thread, and it's actually making me tear up (more than...) a little

/ I remember my mother reading a Pratchett book - Hogfather, I think - to me and my siblings, and choking when she hit Susan Sto Helit's description of having an education and becoming a teacher: (paraphrased) "like getting a sexually transmitted disease and then having the urge to pass it on"
// It's stupid, but my fantasies about having a family have been, when they're not about being good enough to have a family in the first place, about things like reading to my children
/// I guess I'd want to be a "present" father..? My own father was kind of an anti-role model

Your fantasies aren't stupid. And trust me, you're not alone in your feelings about being good enough. I don't know if that feeling ever goes away, even when your kid(s) gets older. That bar is constantly moving up. At least it is for me with my first, who's only a few months old.

Do you have books that you look forward to sharing? I know for me, I have collected many picture books like the Velveteen Rabbit and a few other classics to start (this was well before my child was born). I'm still thinking about what other books I'll share as they get older.


I know if I had a child I'd want to share - and I hope that they'd want me to share..! - Peepo! with them... but that's mostly because it's probably my only "surviving" book from my childhood, and I have a significant emotional connection to it :)

Besides that... well, there are a few appropriate-for-a-child books I've not been able to bring myself to donate because I'd want to share them if I had a child :) (as unlikely as that is to happen - as I don't want to derail the thread: I'm more-or-less undateable, and my perspective on relationships is, nowadays, messed up)

/ And, obviously, things do depend on the tastes of the child; I'd want to try to offer a child a broad variety of tastes, not just what I like :)
// If any of that makes sense
// It's almost 02:00 and I know that I'm not Englishing good :P
 
2021-03-07 11:20:38 PM  

scooterstrats: Except Dr.Seuss.


"Young Man, I said, you're kind of a fool. You'll never catch Marks in Drew Curtis' pool."
 
2021-03-08 9:22:30 AM  

ReluctantLondon: Wendigogo: ReluctantLondon: I'm just going to write that there a lot of awesome parents in this thread, and it's actually making me tear up (more than...) a little

/ I remember my mother reading a Pratchett book - Hogfather, I think - to me and my siblings, and choking when she hit Susan Sto Helit's description of having an education and becoming a teacher: (paraphrased) "like getting a sexually transmitted disease and then having the urge to pass it on"
// It's stupid, but my fantasies about having a family have been, when they're not about being good enough to have a family in the first place, about things like reading to my children
/// I guess I'd want to be a "present" father..? My own father was kind of an anti-role model

Your fantasies aren't stupid. And trust me, you're not alone in your feelings about being good enough. I don't know if that feeling ever goes away, even when your kid(s) gets older. That bar is constantly moving up. At least it is for me with my first, who's only a few months old.

Do you have books that you look forward to sharing? I know for me, I have collected many picture books like the Velveteen Rabbit and a few other classics to start (this was well before my child was born). I'm still thinking about what other books I'll share as they get older.

I know if I had a child I'd want to share - and I hope that they'd want me to share..! - Peepo! with them... but that's mostly because it's probably my only "surviving" book from my childhood, and I have a significant emotional connection to it :)

Besides that... well, there are a few appropriate-for-a-child books I've not been able to bring myself to donate because I'd want to share them if I had a child :) (as unlikely as that is to happen - as I don't want to derail the thread: I'm more-or-less undateable, and my perspective on relationships is, nowadays, messed up)

/ And, obviously, things do depend on the tastes of the child; I'd want to try to offer a child a broad variety of tastes, not just what I like :)
// If any of that makes sense
// It's almost 02:00 and I know that I'm not Englishing good :P

Peepo!

looks like a good one. I don't know how I missed reading it as a child. Thank you for sharing!
 
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