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(Ultimate Classic Rock)   Not sure if you noticed, but Hollywood has been out of ideas for awhile now   (ultimateclassicrock.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Film, Fast Times at Ridgemont High, Ferris Bueller's Day Off, Leonardo DiCaprio, Television program, TV shows, celebrated spin-off, Fast Times  
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1835 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 07 Mar 2021 at 12:50 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-03-06 8:12:35 PM  
We noticed.
 
2021-03-06 8:18:35 PM  
I noticed this back in the early 90s; where were you all?
 
2021-03-06 8:28:10 PM  
The most famous wizard of Oz version from 1939 is also a remake.  A lot of movies back then were.  And they also did radio serials into movies and vice versa
 
2021-03-06 8:36:02 PM  

weddingsinger: The most famous wizard of Oz version from 1939 is also a remake.


Yeah, of a silent film. That's not thee same as rebooting Spider-Man every few years.

Anyway, there are plenty of screenwriters with original ideas. They just don't get made because movies are expensive and Hollywood doesn't like to take chances.
 
2021-03-06 8:45:00 PM  
And then there are the TV shows that got made into crappy movies, such as Leave It To Beaver, The Flintstones, The Brady Bunch, and The Beverly Hillbillies.
 
2021-03-06 8:59:26 PM  

weddingsinger: The most famous wizard of Oz version from 1939 is also a remake.  A lot of movies back then were.  And they also did radio serials into movies and vice versa


Hollywood made silent films for 30 years before talkies, so not really a surprise.   Over 90% of those silent films have been lost to the ravages of time and the fact that early film stock was incredibly flammable.
 
2021-03-06 9:22:56 PM  
It worked with MASH, why didn't it work with the others?
 
2021-03-06 9:45:17 PM  

Ishkur: It worked with MASH, why didn't it work with the others?


I'm not all that familiar with MASH, the movie or TV show but I get the feeling the actors in the show weren't trying to do impressions of the actors in the movie, even though I think they were the same characters.

Like Stargate, MacGuyver wasn't trying to do an impression of Kurt Russel, he did the character his way, with a little more humor. The others, especially the comedies looked like SNL sketches of actors doing bad impressions of other actors.
 
2021-03-06 10:25:56 PM  
awhile. awhile awhile awhile.  Nope, still not a word.
 
2021-03-06 10:26:22 PM  

Ishkur: It worked with MASH, why didn't it work with the others?


One important item that was missing from the list was Buffy the Vampire Slayer. I'm not sure if the wrangling around Joss Whedon writing the script, not liking the movie, and wanting to implement his own vision in the show made it somehow not qualify. However, in the the pure sense of "moderately successful film that then became a TV show with the same premise and characters," I feel like it should should be on there.
 
2021-03-06 10:35:37 PM  
Mission: Impossible is a good example of a decent TV to movie transition. But they were all different characters except for Phelps, who they killed off in the first one.
 
2021-03-06 10:39:00 PM  
I want a "Half Life" movie based on the game from valve and a reboot of Kolchak the night stalker. I know they tried once but it failed.
 
2021-03-06 10:44:42 PM  

Mugato: I'm not all that familiar with MASH, the movie or TV show but I get the feeling the actors in the show weren't trying to do impressions of the actors in the movie, even though I think they were the same characters.


This is exactly it.

The characters are the same but their personalities completely different. Also the show was not trying to be a series-length version of the movie. The movie characters were burned-out cynical pranksters coping with the horrors of war by playing practical jokes on each other, but there was no moralizing or introspection.

The TV show had less jokes but deeper themes. It went further than the movie ever dared to tread and that may be the one key component of a successful series based on a movie: You cannot tone it down and succeed. You can only tone it up.

That's why Buffy and Stargate succeeded, and any TV show based on an R-rated movie was destined to fail. A Robocop who doesn't kill, an Uncle Buck who doesn't swear or beat the shiat out of horny teenagers.... it's risk-averse, G-rated sanitized nonsense no more daring than Full House.

Why does anyone want to watch that b-grade facsimile?
 
2021-03-06 10:52:01 PM  

Ishkur: A Robocop who doesn't kill


RoboCop 3 was a PG-13, after the first film almost got an X (they didn't have NC-17 then) so I never saw it.

The Highlander shows kind of sucked and not just because it violated the whole premise (there can be only one?). It too was watered down for TV.
 
2021-03-06 11:03:51 PM  
Westworld is a recent one that's done quite well, though I suspect they're in the "lets just throw everything in and hope we can come up with an ending when we need to" stage.
Battlestar Galactica was another movie to TV production that had the same problem.

Fargo? Blue Thunder? Planet Of The Apes? Stargate? Terminator? Even Casablanca had a TV series.
 
2021-03-06 11:06:10 PM  
I liked the Weird Science TV show.
 
2021-03-06 11:06:26 PM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: Terminator?


Jeez, I forgot all about Terminator and I actually liked it. I knew not to get too attached to it though.
 
2021-03-06 11:07:46 PM  
Was it the reboot of Spiderman while they were filming both Spiderman and another reboot of Spiderman that tipped you off?
 
2021-03-06 11:16:09 PM  

I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: Was it the reboot of Spiderman while they were filming both Spiderman and another reboot of Spiderman that tipped you off?


If one of those movies turned out to be Multiverse, then I'm fine with it
 
2021-03-06 11:28:52 PM  

Mugato: Carter Pewterschmidt: Terminator?

Jeez, I forgot all about Terminator and I actually liked it. I knew not to get too attached to it though.


I liked the Sarah Connor Chronicles a lot. I liked that it went a bit further into the worldbuilding and logistics of the machine race, and it even introduced some of the best new ideas the franchise had since the first movie: That a lot of Terminators sent back aren't sent to kill anyone at all, but rather to gather materials and resources necessary to bring about Skynet's existence and kill anyone who doesn't help them (cf. Roko's basilisk). And that there are multiple AIs in the future and they don't all get along.

The problem was the show was stuck in that overlap period between episodic and serial storytelling in television, and as such the second season had the classically mandated 22 episodes and a lot of them were filler/bottle/one-off low budget eps that did nothing to move the story along. And other storylines were padded out for several eps when they should've been resolved in one or two. People lost interest and the ratings tanked.

If they tightened the scripts, cut the eps in half and streamlined the main plot without any meandering nonsense or sideplots, it could have succeeded. I didn't even care that Lena Headey looked nothing like Linda Hamilton. The show was compelling for a lot of new ideas it introduced into the Terminator universe that no movie has touched on since.
 
2021-03-06 11:50:39 PM  

Ishkur: I didn't even care that Lena Headey looked nothing like Linda Hamilton.


I accepted Lena Headley way easier than I accepted Emilia Clarke. To me she was nothing like Sarah Connor.
 
2021-03-07 12:05:54 AM  

Thrakkorzog: I want a "Half Life" movie based on the game from valve and a reboot of Kolchak the night stalker. I know they tried once but it failed.


Fun fact: The Were-Monster episode from the new X-Files was an unused script from the new Night Stalker show.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-03-07 12:25:23 AM  

Ishkur: Mugato: I'm not all that familiar with MASH, the movie or TV show but I get the feeling the actors in the show weren't trying to do impressions of the actors in the movie, even though I think they were the same characters.

This is exactly it.

The characters are the same but their personalities completely different. Also the show was not trying to be a series-length version of the movie. The movie characters were burned-out cynical pranksters coping with the horrors of war by playing practical jokes on each other, but there was no moralizing or introspection.

The TV show had less jokes but deeper themes. It went further than the movie ever dared to tread and that may be the one key component of a successful series based on a movie: You cannot tone it down and succeed. You can only tone it up.

That's why Buffy and Stargate succeeded, and any TV show based on an R-rated movie was destined to fail. A Robocop who doesn't kill, an Uncle Buck who doesn't swear or beat the shiat out of horny teenagers.... it's risk-averse, G-rated sanitized nonsense no more daring than Full House.

Why does anyone want to watch that b-grade facsimile?


Also, MASH allowed a much more significant arc for the characters than a 2 hr movie. I stole this from another Fark thread about MASH a few years ago:
BJ Hunnicut:  Don't forget that his character arrived in Korea fresh out of residency. He was pretty happy-go-lucky when he arrived, because he was young and inexperienced (though competent).
Then he sees what the war really does.
And he starts drinking heavily.
And cheats on his wife (and feels miserable about it).
And misses his daughter's birthday.
And, and, and....
He's traumatized the most in the shortest amount of time. He grew the mustache and wild hair and sanctimonious becausehe stopped taking care of himself.One of the most subtle things the show did (once Frank was gone, anyway) was change the characters over time to show how the building PTSD was affecting all of them.
* Hawkeye fell deeper and deeper into depression and madness in a slow burn, ultimately culminating in confinement in a psych ward. Notice that his episodes with Sidney increased in frequency over time.
* BJ had more to lose, and went from clean-cut-all-American to filthy hippie in a blink. He didn't even make it to the 4077 before literally throwing up over what he witnessed.
* Charles ended up having a full-blown existential crisis.
* Potter went "cranky old man" more and more every time the war took an unexpected turn.
* Margaret was so emotionally distraught that, after seeing literally hundreds of men die in front of her and despite being Regular Army, near the end she was brought to hysterics by a dead stray dog.
* Fr. Mulcahy never felt he was doing enough, and tried coping with this by actively seeking out life-threatening situations. He literally acquired a death wish.
* Only Klinger maintained his sanity mostly intact, in theCatch-22sense, and this was lampshaded by Sidney. Since he was the only one actively trying to escape from hell, he was easily the sanest of the bunch.
BJ wasn't "amping up the righteous" out of the blue. He was in immense psychic pain, and that's how it manifested in his character.
 
2021-03-07 12:33:24 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size

Not out of ideas.  More like extreme preference for a single idea.
 
2021-03-07 12:46:39 AM  

dj_bigbird: * Hawkeye fell deeper and deeper into depression and madness in a slow burn, ultimately culminating in confinement in a psych ward


Because he ordered a Korean woman to silence her crying baby and she did so by strangling it. That's what finally broke him. And to be fair that would've broken anyone.

Yes the show was technically a sit-com, but it went to some seriously dark places sometimes. It never shied away from the reality of the subject matter, and that's why the show was so beloved. Good writing, strong characters, universal themes, and unlike most 70s sit-coms it still holds up relatively well today.
 
2021-03-07 1:04:00 AM  

dj_bigbird: He's traumatized the most in the shortest amount of time. He grew the mustache and wild hair and sanctimonious becausehe stopped taking care of himself.One of the most subtle things the show did (once Frank was gone, anyway) was change the characters over time to show how the building PTSD was affecting all of them.
* Hawkeye fell deeper and deeper into depression and madness in a slow burn, ultimately culminating in confinement in a psych ward. Notice that his episodes with Sidney increased in frequency over time.
* BJ had more to lose, and went from clean-cut-all-American to filthy hippie in a blink. He didn't even make it to the 4077 before literally throwing up over what he witnessed.
* Charles ended up having a full-blown existential crisis.
* Potter went "cranky old man" more and more every time the war took an unexpected turn.
* Margaret was so emotionally distraught that, after seeing literally hundreds of men die in front of her and despite being Regular Army, near the end she was brought to hysterics by a dead stray dog.
* Fr. Mulcahy never felt he was doing enough, and tried coping with this by actively seeking out life-threatening situations. He literally acquired a death wish.


While not disputing that, it is worth pointing out that AFAIK US servicemen did not spend eleven years in action.

I believe one year was the standard tour. Long enough, but not what we saw Hawkeye, Margaret, Mulcahy and others do. The show portrayed them all as there forever, with no end in sight. IRL they'd all have had an end date to look forward to, and that would make a huge psychological difference.
 
2021-03-07 2:16:35 AM  
The ghost busters cartoon was pretty fun, in my opinion.
 
2021-03-07 2:26:20 AM  
Hollywood isn't out of ideas, people just won't watch anything they don't already know for sure they'll enjoy. It's our fault, not Hollywood. Hollywood would love to make more weird original movies, but how do they pay for them? With Marvel movies. Lots and lots of Marvel movies.
 
2021-03-07 2:26:37 AM  

Lorelle: And then there are the TV shows that got made into crappy movies, such as Leave It To Beaver, The Flintstones, The Brady Bunch, and The Beverly Hillbillies.


The Bradybunch movies were fun
 
2021-03-07 2:29:17 AM  

Esroc: Hollywood isn't out of ideas, people just won't watch anything they don't already know for sure they'll enjoy. It's our fault, not Hollywood. Hollywood would love to make more weird original movies, but how do they pay for them? With Marvel movies. Lots and lots of Marvel movies.


Yep
 
2021-03-07 2:35:04 AM  

Mugato: I'm not all that familiar with MASH, the movie or TV show but I get the feeling the actors in the show weren't trying to do impressions of the actors in the movie, even though I think they were the same characters.


This is true.  Shortly before filming started on the series, CBS set up a screening of the movie (which is very good in it's own right) for the cast to learn their characters.  Larry Gelbart, who created the series, cancelled the screening and told the cast (most of whom had of course seen the movie earlier) to create their own interpretations of the characters.

If you watch both the movie and the series, the difference between the Hawkeye, Trapper and Henry are very different between the two.
 
2021-03-07 3:44:42 AM  
"Hollywood is out of ideas! They keep turning movies into TV shows!"

"I think you meant the television industry is out of ideas. A story on Hollywood being out of ideas would be about movies made from TV shows. Was that really the best angle you could come up with for your dumb article?"

"I was out of ideas."
 
2021-03-07 5:11:26 AM  

Nora Gretz: The ghost busters cartoon was pretty fun, in my opinion.


I agree 100%.

Also:

I fully admit to enjoying the Weird Science TV show when I was in high school. (Graduated in '97.). Plus, Duckman would air right after it....not bad for a Saturday night if I happened to be stuck at home.
 
2021-03-07 5:15:25 AM  
Also, the Weird Science show introduced us to the lovey Vanessa Angel.

For no reason at all, here she is in the 1996 classic Kingpin:

Kingpin (Claudia)
Youtube a9fG42qGHAw
 
2021-03-07 5:56:27 AM  
The Ferris Bueller show was competing with Parker Lewis Can't Lose, which was an obvious no-win scenario for Ferris.
 
2021-03-07 7:43:39 AM  
Narrator: Hollywood was never in ideas
 
2021-03-07 8:25:13 AM  
Back in the 80s I always assumed that any movie that was a success they would try to do a series. With one exception (M*A*S*H) and maybe another I have forgotten, every one of these series died a quick death. The characters in the movies just could not be replaced, budgets were never close, etc. I just remember reading about how Hollywood would finally give up on this trend from the 70s, and that was in late 80s/early 90s I read an article on this. So happy Hollywood learned their less....oh never mind.
 
2021-03-07 9:07:09 AM  

Ishkur: It worked with MASH, why didn't it work with the others?


Economics? MASH was probably cheaper to option. They had money to spend on a good cast, production and writing. Plus, the subject matter was deep. War is heavy, and MASH was a commentary on what was happening at the time in Vietnam.

Those other movies were hits, and probably costs more to option. Hack writers, unknown actors and vastly superficial foundational material that had a short shelf life doomed them.
 
2021-03-07 9:34:54 AM  

Ishkur: dj_bigbird: * Hawkeye fell deeper and deeper into depression and madness in a slow burn, ultimately culminating in confinement in a psych ward

Because he ordered a Korean woman to silence her crying baby and she did so by strangling it. That's what finally broke him. And to be fair that would've broken anyone.

Yes the show was technically a sit-com, but it went to some seriously dark places sometimes. It never shied away from the reality of the subject matter, and that's why the show was so beloved. Good writing, strong characters, universal themes, and unlike most 70s sit-coms it still holds up relatively well today.


Plus he was in a war zone for 11 years, that would drive most people mad.
 
2021-03-07 10:00:59 AM  

stuhayes2010: Plus he was in a war zone for 11 years, that would drive most people mad.


Especially for a war that lasted three.
 
2021-03-07 10:55:53 AM  

Nora Gretz: The ghost busters cartoon was pretty fun, in my opinion.


Fun, and also occasionally legit terrifying. At least to my child self, anyway. There were a few episodes that opened my mind to the concept of existential dread, and I did not like it. I mean, I do now. But not then.
 
2021-03-07 11:19:09 AM  

Herr Morgenstern: Nora Gretz: The ghost busters cartoon was pretty fun, in my opinion.

Fun, and also occasionally legit terrifying. At least to my child self, anyway. There were a few episodes that opened my mind to the concept of existential dread, and I did not like it. I mean, I do now. But not then.


Now you like the concept of existential dread? Which aspects do you consider the most appealing?
 
2021-03-07 11:25:38 AM  

EdgeRunner: Herr Morgenstern: Nora Gretz: The ghost busters cartoon was pretty fun, in my opinion.

Fun, and also occasionally legit terrifying. At least to my child self, anyway. There were a few episodes that opened my mind to the concept of existential dread, and I did not like it. I mean, I do now. But not then.

Now you like the concept of existential dread? Which aspects do you consider the most appealing?


I write short horror, and work with that a lot. Lovecraftian themes, fates worse than death, mankind unable to stare into the face of true knowledge without going mad. Things like that.
 
2021-03-07 11:32:16 AM  

Wadded Beef: I liked the Weird Science TV show.



Indeed.

64.media.tumblr.comView Full Size



She was a decent enough comic actress as well.
 
2021-03-07 11:40:36 AM  

dj_bigbird: Ishkur: Mugato: I'm not all that familiar with MASH, the movie or TV show but I get the feeling the actors in the show weren't trying to do impressions of the actors in the movie, even though I think they were the same characters.

This is exactly it.

The characters are the same but their personalities completely different. Also the show was not trying to be a series-length version of the movie. The movie characters were burned-out cynical pranksters coping with the horrors of war by playing practical jokes on each other, but there was no moralizing or introspection.

The TV show had less jokes but deeper themes. It went further than the movie ever dared to tread and that may be the one key component of a successful series based on a movie: You cannot tone it down and succeed. You can only tone it up.

That's why Buffy and Stargate succeeded, and any TV show based on an R-rated movie was destined to fail. A Robocop who doesn't kill, an Uncle Buck who doesn't swear or beat the shiat out of horny teenagers.... it's risk-averse, G-rated sanitized nonsense no more daring than Full House.

Why does anyone want to watch that b-grade facsimile?

Also, MASH allowed a much more significant arc for the characters than a 2 hr movie. I stole this from another Fark thread about MASH a few years ago:
BJ Hunnicut:  Don't forget that his character arrived in Korea fresh out of residency. He was pretty happy-go-lucky when he arrived, because he was young and inexperienced (though competent).
Then he sees what the war really does.
And he starts drinking heavily.
And cheats on his wife (and feels miserable about it).
And misses his daughter's birthday.
And, and, and....
He's traumatized the most in the shortest amount of time. He grew the mustache and wild hair and sanctimonious becausehe stopped taking care of himself.One of the most subtle things the show did (once Frank was gone, anyway) was change the characters over time to show how the building PTSD was affecting all of them.
* ...


In the book Radar was a 14 year old kid who lied about his age and joined the Army.   His mom needed the money,    His leaving the Teddy Bear behind shows his loss of innocence. .
 
2021-03-07 11:53:54 AM  

Streetwise Hercules: The Ferris Bueller show was competing with Parker Lewis Can't Lose, which was an obvious no-win scenario for Ferris. TV Viewers


FTFY
 
2021-03-07 1:00:12 PM  
I don't know why people consider movies or television copying a popular theme to mean that Hollywood is out of ideas.  Can you imagine if it were carried over to other things.

Some place named "The Rock" decided to make pizzas. What a stupid idea.  We get it, pepperoni is popular but there isn't any need for 20 different franchises to be selling it.

Auto manufacturers just keep doing the same thing again and again.  Four doors, four wheels, how about some originality for a change?  Shake things up, make a hover car or something with treads.  And don't get me started on the individual series.  Do we really need a Mustang episode 20?

It isn't the lack of ideas that makes entertainment bad.  It's the lack of writing, directing, or acting ability.
 
2021-03-07 1:16:25 PM  
Thank god for porn parodies
 
2021-03-07 2:04:03 PM  

Mugato: stuhayes2010: Plus he was in a war zone for 11 years, that would drive most people mad.

Especially for a war that lasted three.


In some ways it was apt; it felt to them like it lasted 11 years with all the horrors of war displayed before them.
 
2021-03-07 5:57:35 PM  

The_Sponge: Nora Gretz: The ghost busters cartoon was pretty fun, in my opinion.

I agree 100%.

Also:

I fully admit to enjoying the Weird Science TV show when I was in high school. (Graduated in '97.). Plus, Duckman would air right after it....not bad for a Saturday night if I happened to be stuck at home.


The Funky Duckman
Youtube LcGXR00x1ro
 
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