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(Abc.net.au)   A real-life Jurassic Park, but with plants. Life finds a way   (abc.net.au) divider line
    More: Interesting, Plant, Tasmania, plant species, Gondwana, Botany, Dr Tonia Cochran, Cretaceous, Dinosaur  
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857 clicks; posted to STEM » on 06 Mar 2021 at 9:53 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



11 Comments     (+0 »)
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2021-03-06 5:20:17 PM  
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2021-03-06 5:23:54 PM  
Where do they keep the massive mounds of plant poop?
 
2021-03-06 10:11:56 PM  

Smock Pot: Where do they keep the massive mounds of plant poop?


A plant scooper, duh:

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2021-03-06 10:29:38 PM  
We can just nuke the whole island when it all goes Shop-Of-Horrors.
We're going to do anyway
 
2021-03-07 4:07:37 AM  
Half life of DNA is about 521 years, nothing left that's usable after about 6.8m years or so, so how did they manage 150m years? Oh, it's still growing somewhere.
 
2021-03-07 7:28:59 AM  
writeups.orgView Full Size
 
2021-03-07 8:10:53 AM  

Kerr Avon: Half life of DNA is about 521 years, nothing left that's usable after about 6.8m years or so, so how did they manage 150m years? Oh, it's still growing somewhere.


Biologist, here.

You're assuming things; DNA has no 'half-life'. Spider (my field) DNA from 200,000,000 years ago encased in amber is still viable.
 
2021-03-07 2:18:05 PM  
Hollywood finds a way.
 
2021-03-07 2:51:22 PM  

Jedekai: Kerr Avon: Half life of DNA is about 521 years, nothing left that's usable after about 6.8m years or so, so how did they manage 150m years? Oh, it's still growing somewhere.

Biologist, here.

You're assuming things; DNA has no 'half-life'. Spider (my field) DNA from 200,000,000 years ago encased in amber is still viable.


They've also planted seeds older than that.
 
2021-03-07 2:51:52 PM  

leeksfromchichis: Jedekai: Kerr Avon: Half life of DNA is about 521 years, nothing left that's usable after about 6.8m years or so, so how did they manage 150m years? Oh, it's still growing somewhere.

Biologist, here.

You're assuming things; DNA has no 'half-life'. Spider (my field) DNA from 200,000,000 years ago encased in amber is still viable.

They've also planted seeds older than that.


521 I mean, not millions of years afik
 
2021-03-07 2:58:01 PM  
oil company remark; old goat dino remark;  Australia ref;

and beneath the ice where theseed pods roam there lies a certain carnivore (plant),(triffid)
weakening current took it somewhere unexpected.
 
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