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(Fark)   Anyone have experience with vertigo? Had my first this morning. Thought I was going to die   (fark.com) divider line
    More: Sick, Panic attack, Jack Sabbath, Shortness of breath, Fandom, inner ear infection, Inner ear, Labyrinthitis, Drink water  
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245 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 06 Mar 2021 at 3:30 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-03-05 9:19:11 PM  
I thought vertigo was just being dizzy. The massive sweaty panic attack and wondering if I was going to check out was not a lot of fun.
Been feeling depleted and a bit nauseous all day.
No shortness of breath or chest pains or anything heart attacky.
 
2021-03-05 9:22:21 PM  
Are your ears plugged?  My wife has had several go-arounds with it and usually involves an inner ear infection.
 
2021-03-05 9:28:08 PM  
I've found the Epley Maneuver helpful - it does require a sofa, bench or table, but it works ... at least for me.

My first attack I was too dizzy to CRAWL.
The second - about 4 years later - was just annoying.
The last one - about 6 weeks ago - was at work and embarrassing - taking meclizine for a few days after just to keep it at bay ... it did loom and threaten.

Hope this helps!
 
2021-03-05 9:28:22 PM  

Another Government Employee: Are your ears plugged?  My wife has had several go-arounds with it and usually involves an inner ear infection.


No ear plugging but occasional ringing in one of them.
 
2021-03-05 9:29:12 PM  

dionysusaur: I've found the Epley Maneuver helpful - it does require a sofa, bench or table, but it works ... at least for me.

My first attack I was too dizzy to CRAWL.
The second - about 4 years later - was just annoying.
The last one - about 6 weeks ago - was at work and embarrassing - taking meclizine for a few days after just to keep it at bay ... it did loom and threaten.

Hope this helps!


Meant to include the link
 
2021-03-05 9:30:39 PM  

Jack Sabbath: I thought vertigo was just being dizzy. The massive sweaty panic attack and wondering if I was going to check out was not a lot of fun.
Been feeling depleted and a bit nauseous all day.
No shortness of breath or chest pains or anything heart attacky.


Feeling like you're going to die, and vertigo are symptoms of a panic attack, not the other way around.
 
2021-03-05 9:31:46 PM  
Get it checked out. It may be as simple as an inner ear infection, but a regular visit to at least let your doctor know is a good idea.
If it happens again,especially if worse or you start vomiting, consider going to the ER.

Otherwise enjoy the sweet sweet embrace of the 'rona
 
2021-03-05 9:34:08 PM  

Jack Sabbath: I thought vertigo was just being dizzy. The massive sweaty panic attack and wondering if I was going to check out was not a lot of fun.
Been feeling depleted and a bit nauseous all day.
No shortness of breath or chest pains or anything heart attacky.


I have a very close friend who has had that and it's an ongoing issue for her. She thinks it might be because of covid. I mentioned this to someone else I know who had tested positive for covid and she mentioned getting vertigo too along with covid migraines and other covid symptoms, but her vertigo cleared up.  It's apparently a real covid symptom.  It's probably not covid in your case but you should probably get a covid test just in case.

If it's due to a viral infection and neurological it's best to get treated quickly if possible according to what I've been told about other things I've had.
 
2021-03-05 9:49:11 PM  

Lambskincoat: Jack Sabbath: I thought vertigo was just being dizzy. The massive sweaty panic attack and wondering if I was going to check out was not a lot of fun.
Been feeling depleted and a bit nauseous all day.
No shortness of breath or chest pains or anything heart attacky.

Feeling like you're going to die, and vertigo are symptoms of a panic attack, not the other way around.


Only reason I didn't completely freak out is that I've had panic attacks before. Mind you I've never had one this bad but I was pretty sure that's what it was.

Earlier in the day I bent over and got a head rush when I stood up. That's not that unusual but it contained dizziness I am not accustomed to.

I put my head down on my keyboard momentarily this morning and it happened again. This was right before the attack hit.

And I've had leftover dizziness off and on for the remainder of the day.

Definitely going to get checked out.
 
2021-03-05 9:49:42 PM  

dionysusaur: My first attack I was too dizzy to CRAWL.


My first attack I was praying someone would break into the house, find me on the floor, and shoot me.

/subsequent episodes have not (knock on wood) been nearly so severe.
//meclizine works for me
 
2021-03-05 10:02:55 PM  

Jack Sabbath: Lambskincoat: Jack Sabbath: I thought vertigo was just being dizzy. The massive sweaty panic attack and wondering if I was going to check out was not a lot of fun.
Been feeling depleted and a bit nauseous all day.
No shortness of breath or chest pains or anything heart attacky.

Feeling like you're going to die, and vertigo are symptoms of a panic attack, not the other way around.

Only reason I didn't completely freak out is that I've had panic attacks before. Mind you I've never had one this bad but I was pretty sure that's what it was.

Earlier in the day I bent over and got a head rush when I stood up. That's not that unusual but it contained dizziness I am not accustomed to.

I put my head down on my keyboard momentarily this morning and it happened again. This was right before the attack hit.

And I've had leftover dizziness off and on for the remainder of the day.

Definitely going to get checked out.


That definitely needs to be checked out asap, like tomorrow.
 
2021-03-05 10:14:31 PM  
Kind of?

On Monday for pretty much all day I was finding that I was perfectly fine if I was sitting or laying down, no matter what - laptop, watching TV, whatever. But any time I got up, vertigo (or something like it) staggered me so hard that I'd have to lean against a wall to keep from falling over.

Weird, disconcerting. Not sure if it counts as vertigo per se, but it was certainly in the neighbourhood.
 
2021-03-05 10:18:19 PM  
I had a good thump to the head that set off over a decade long bout with vertigo that would turn me inside out during attacks.

I learned to be able to spot an inbound attack vs mild dizziness by closing my eyes and then touching my eyelids to see if my eyes were twitching.  The vestibular system in your inner ear works with your eyes to determine your bodies orientation.   When it starts malfunctioning it keeps telling your eyes that it disagrees on which way "up" is and your eyes will start trying to reconcile this information by searching for a reference point.  If your eyeballs are involuntarily moving (feels like twitching when you touch them) when your eyes are closed, you are getting bad info from your inner ears and you are about to have a bad time.

Drink water, turn down the lights and relax as much as possible and breathe steadily, this helps it pass for me.

Alternatively, (since this is Fark) pound a triple double of your favorite high proof spirit and it will help muddy the signals between your inner ear and brain.
 
2021-03-05 10:27:03 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
jbc [TotalFark]
2021-03-05 10:41:32 PM  
I found it makes the Irish count 1, 2, 3, 14.
 
2021-03-05 10:51:01 PM  
Have it checked out, may be nothing, may be something.  It sucks, but it's not the end of the world right now.  Kind of like a random bout of diarrhea.  More of an annoying inconvenience, unless it's something serious.

CSB: took off from Dusseldorf with a layover in JFK, then on to LAX.  At some point during the DUS-JFK leg I got vertigo.  Bad.  Had to hold on to the luggage cart to walk through customs.  Neither eye could focus on the same thing.  Everyone thought I was drunk.  Made it to LA, went to the ER.  Nothing serious, but it was a day before my eyes would focus on anything, 2 days until I could walk on my own.
 
2021-03-05 11:31:15 PM  
Could be Menears, avoid alcohol and take a trip to see your doctor. It sucks, but is treatable.  Or it could be a heart condition fixed with drugs, too familar with it.
 
2021-03-05 11:37:41 PM  
Epley Maneuver to Treat BPPV Vertigo
Youtube 9SLm76jQg3g
 
2021-03-05 11:41:09 PM  
Had vertigo the first time a couple of years ago. Went to bed fine, woke up completely disabled. Freaked me out.
Meklazine works a bit, but multiple repetitions of the epley maneuver fixed it.  Have someone watch the video then have them watch your eyes as you try the maneuver... They're a dead giveaway.
 
2021-03-06 1:54:36 AM  

Lighting: Alternatively, (since this is Fark) pound a triple double of your favorite high proof spirit and it will help muddy the signals between your inner ear and brain.


Now that this has gone green I should clarify, don't do this unless absolutely everything else checks out medically.  I had a full CAT scan and ER visit and was cleared on any other condition that could be causing it.

Meclizine helped some and cyclobenzaprine helped a lot more, but when I got a new doctor I had to fight to get a prescription for the latter.

Eventually it just kind of stopped
 
2021-03-06 2:46:55 AM  
I had a bout of it a few months back. Woke up in the morning and felt like my eyes and brain were flipping around inside my head. That "too dizzy to crawl" was spot on. I was glad I was in bed. I did not make it to the bathroom in time to vomit into the toilet, but at least I got it on the hardwood instead of the carpet. I spent the day in bed. It happened again the next morning, with that day going like the day before, except I made it to the bathroom that time. It calmed down over the next few days, no more vomiting, but I also did the Epley maneuver for it after about a week, which helped a lot.

I'd had some lesser vertigo years earlier and a nurse practitioner guided me hands-on through the Epley, but I don't remember if he told me what it was called.
 
2021-03-06 4:00:32 AM  

Avatox: Could be Menears, avoid alcohol and take a trip to see your doctor. It sucks, but is treatable.  Or it could be a heart condition fixed with drugs, too familar with it.


Meniere's Disease Diagnosis

* Two episodes of vertigo, each lasting 20 minutes or longer but not longer than 12 hours
* Hearing loss verified by a hearing test
* Tinnitus or a feeling of fullness in your ear
* Exclusion of other known causes of these problems

Ménière's disease has links with stress and anxiety. However, it is unclear whether stress and anxiety cause symptoms of Ménière's disease, or whether the disease leads to stress and anxiety.

In a person with Méniére's disease, levels of hearing loss may fluctuate, especially early on in the disease's progression.

The person may also be more sensitive to loud sounds. Eventually, most people with Ménière's develop some degree of long-term hearing loss.

In its early stages, Ménière's disease causes sudden and unpredictable episodes of vertigo.
During these episodes, there will be some loss of hearing, which typically returns to normal once vertigo subsides. The ear may feel uncomfortable and blocked and have a sense of fullness or pressure. Tinnitus is also common in early stage Ménière's disease.
After a vertigo attack due to Ménière's disease, a person often has extreme exhaustion and feels the need to sleep for hours.


I recently developed Meniere'd Disease. The description above was 100% accurate. There is no cure, only medication to reduce the symptoms.
 
433 [TotalFark]
2021-03-06 5:05:37 AM  
I had it as a side effect of a medication once.  I couldn't judge distance, but sometimes I could manage pieces while the rest seemed flat/two dimensional or very far away.  I could become sick and/or fall by looking at my feet.  I understand that's barely a nick on the real scale of actual vertigo and I was experiencing something a little different.  It was still a real SOB to try and navigate reality and keep from throwing up or accidentally grabbing someone.

I wish good fortune and that you will see a solution soon.
 
2021-03-06 6:29:38 AM  
I had bouts for almost 20 years (mine is of the positional variety)....I couldn't look up without the room spinning, I couldn't lay flat on my back...flying required Dramamine..

In short: Physical therapy. Some lovely people made me a little dizzy 2 times per week for a few weeks. Did some home stuff as well. I feel worlds better....not 100%, but I can change my oil without throwing up.

What to do: Visit you ENT to verify there isn't a structural issue in your ear (or pathology).
Something as simple as a rogue hair resting on your eardrum can cause this. Plus, the ENT can prescribe the afore mentioned physical therapy
 
2021-03-06 6:45:29 AM  

Jack Sabbath: Lambskincoat: Jack Sabbath: I thought vertigo was just being dizzy. The massive sweaty panic attack and wondering if I was going to check out was not a lot of fun.
Been feeling depleted and a bit nauseous all day.
No shortness of breath or chest pains or anything heart attacky.

Feeling like you're going to die, and vertigo are symptoms of a panic attack, not the other way around.

Only reason I didn't completely freak out is that I've had panic attacks before. Mind you I've never had one this bad but I was pretty sure that's what it was.

Earlier in the day I bent over and got a head rush when I stood up. That's not that unusual but it contained dizziness I am not accustomed to.

I put my head down on my keyboard momentarily this morning and it happened again. This was right before the attack hit.

And I've had leftover dizziness off and on for the remainder of the day.

Definitely going to get checked out.


What you're describing is not vertigo. At least not benign positional vertigo. The additional symptoms (not a doctor, but experienced years of vertigo and more than one panic attack) indicate something else. See a doctor ASAP.

Keep someone nearby. If you have another attack, have them watch your eyes for weird movements. A common symptom of BPV is involuntary eye movement. Google for a video.
 
2021-03-06 7:03:05 AM  
There is also a condition called Superior Canal Dehiscence. It's nasty but can be corrected. The right kind of very fine Cat Scan can find the hole.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superio​r​_canal_dehiscence_syndrome?wprov=sfla1​
 
2021-03-06 7:12:30 AM  
I, too, am over 40.  My body keeps falling apart, and every day I wake up not dead.
 
2021-03-06 7:19:00 AM  

tdyak: I, too, am over 40.  My body keeps falling apart, and every day I wake up not dead.


I hear ya. Not sure what's worse, waking up or not being dead.
 
2021-03-06 7:25:44 AM  

tdyak: I, too, am over 40.  My body keeps falling apart, and every day I wake up not dead.


As I look on to later life, I hate the thought that my body will not be able to do the things that I'll finally have time to do...
 
2021-03-06 7:27:05 AM  
Let's tell my story.  I had a very minor stroke in 2017 that was misdiagnosed in the beginning.  Physical facts, 35yo, massively overweight but was losing weight at the time, no other major issues.

I went to bed just fine, woke up unable to walk straight and having to hold onto the walls to move through the house.  No "FAST" symptoms, which confused the doctor, myself, and a friend.  Couldn't close my eyes without puking (and this is coming from someone who vomited the last time in the year 2000, so I have one hell of a constitution.)

Went to the doctor, they thought it was an inner ear thing, got steroids.  Then my vision went. Didn't get better, didn't get better. Eventually got referred to a inner ear specialist that said "Oh, just calm down you're fine, but we can order a MRI if you want to calm your tits."  It wasn't that exact wording due to professional courtesy, but it was pretty damn close to that.

Had the MRI, MRI Dr. saw where it happened, but because it was so long after the event (at this time this was a month+ after), it was labeled as a 'chronic infarct'.  PCP said "Oh, we don't know when that happened".  ENT called a month after the MRI and said "Did anyone call you on that MRI we ordered?" (Yes, they were THAT bad).  During this post-MRI time, went to Physical therapy to start working on balance again, got a referral to another ENT who said Meneres.  Also went thru a battery of tests with the second ENT, BPPV came back negative, but Cochlear(?) came back abnormal, he still said Meneres.  At this time, we have a PCP that thinks it's BPV, an ENT that thinks its in my imagined head, a second ENT that thinks it's Meneres, and a Neurologist that thinks it was a Stroke.

My "Ah-ha" moment came to me when I went to my (new) Psychologist.  Went to him, started talking about my issues regarding the vertigo and the chain of events, without saying what I had been diagnosed with by the myriad of other doctors.  He asked to see my MRI, I gave it to him, he looked at it and said "Oh, yea, you stroked out."  I gave him a puzzled look and said "Okay, what qualifies you to say that?"  'Look behind you and read my degree'.  *turns around*.... "Neuropsychologist", Neurologist.  I wasn't aware of that when I booked him, so that's why it threw me off.  I just thought he was some bog standard Psych, not a Neuro-Psych.

At this point, I'm happy I might get some answers, so I challenge him.  He's was the type of person that's very intelligent, but lacks in people skills and in some days, would rather just tell you "this is your treatment, let's give this a shot" after 3-4 minutes of your input.  I must have got him on a good day or he realized that I was exasperated from the whole ordeal and wanted logical answers to his conclusion.  He calmly laid out his thoughts, answered my probing questions when I went down the chain of events, explained why the Dr's thought what they thought, explained why certain tests came out that way, and then gave his conclusion, which also mirrored the other Neurologist.

PCP wasn't sold but eventually came around as soon as I got better in a stroke-like fashion.  ENT1 I gave up on after they didn't follow up for a month.  ENT2 still thinks its Meneres, but I haven't gone back for another round of audiology tests to clear the air on that end.  Both Neuros still say stroke.

It took awhile but I'm back to 99.8% normal with no lasting effects.  My closed-eye balance took the longest to return to normal.  Come to find out that this kind of stroke is heavily misdiagnosed because of the lack of 'FAST'.

Good luck.
 
2021-03-06 7:37:00 AM  
I've had it a few times. Can't sit up or stand without everything spinning. Weird numbness in hands. Sweating like crazy. Every time it happened was after eating bread.
 
2021-03-06 7:41:52 AM  
Doesn't that usually involve tequila?
 
2021-03-06 7:49:08 AM  
I have nothing of value to add to this good advice (typical) but I do want to reiterate that Kim Novak was a genuine hottie back in the day.
 
2021-03-06 8:19:45 AM  
My friend had vertigo (no panic attack symptoms) for about 6 weeks to the point where he had to take time off work because he couldn't drive or function.  We went out to eat and he was stumbling around like a drunk.  It was an inner ear thing that had to resolve itself and it was frightening and frustrating.  Get your ears checked.  Hope it's not serious.
I can get more details from him if you're interested.  Pm me at my Fark email.
 
2021-03-06 8:41:34 AM  
To beat a dead drum - definitely get it checked. It was the leading edge indicator of my father's MS.  Certainly not saying it's a likely serious neurological condition, but it's possible. And early diagnosis, plus the particular type of MS, plus the medications available, has led to the disease being almost at a standstill.  An occasional bout of vertigo was the only symptom he suffered for over 20 years; close family is noticing a slight cognative issue at ~70 years old -trouble finding the correct word, trouble doing fairly basic arithmetic in his head (retired nuke engineer, used to do serious math).  But overall, pretty mild.  Again, stressing the early diagnosis and early pharmaceutical intervention as keeping it more or less at bay.
 
2021-03-06 8:53:38 AM  
I had it for nearly two months (24/7) about 25 years ago, and it was thoroughly miserable. I'd basically spend my days walking with my hand steadying myself against walls and railings, and was worried that everyone might think I was drunk all the time. I ended up having a coworker drive me to work after the first couple of weeks.

I had MRIs and a full range of testing at UCLA, and the results were ... nothing, which to them meant that a cilia inside my labyrinthe tubes (inner ear) was likely stuck in one of the internal valves,** and that in some unknown amount of time, it would magically go away when the cilia worked itself free. And that's exactly what happened about three weeks later. Hasn't ever recurred.

// ** The valve being stuck open was a signal that my body was not only spinning on that axis, but that the spinning was always accelerating.
 
2021-03-06 8:59:26 AM  

Jack Sabbath: I thought vertigo was just being dizzy. The massive sweaty panic attack and wondering if I was going to check out was not a lot of fun.
Been feeling depleted and a bit nauseous all day.
No shortness of breath or chest pains or anything heart attacky.


Had a buddy who got it occasionally starting in his thirties. The panic attack is a separate condition caused by the understandable freakout of your first vertigo experience. I can't help with the vertigo, but as someone who got rocked by a panic attack post Covid, I will say don't let that fear of panic rule your life. Accept that panic (and vertigo for that matter) won't kill you and move on. Otherwise you'll become a ball of nerves worried when it's gonna happen again.
 
2021-03-06 9:10:41 AM  

mofa: I had it for nearly two months (24/7) about 25 years ago, and it was thoroughly miserable. I'd basically spend my days walking with my hand steadying myself against walls and railings, and was worried that everyone might think I was drunk all the time. I ended up having a coworker drive me to work after the first couple of weeks.

I had MRIs and a full range of testing at UCLA, and the results were ... nothing, which to them meant that a cilia inside my labyrinthe tubes (inner ear) was likely stuck in one of the internal valves,** and that in some unknown amount of time, it would magically go away when the cilia worked itself free. And that's exactly what happened about three weeks later. Hasn't ever recurred.

// ** The valve being stuck open was a signal that my body was not only spinning on that axis, but that the spinning was always accelerating.


Your // sounds like the ending to  a physics problem in hell
 
2021-03-06 9:23:04 AM  

Jack Sabbath: Lambskincoat: Jack Sabbath: I thought vertigo was just being dizzy. The massive sweaty panic attack and wondering if I was going to check out was not a lot of fun.
Been feeling depleted and a bit nauseous all day.
No shortness of breath or chest pains or anything heart attacky.

Feeling like you're going to die, and vertigo are symptoms of a panic attack, not the other way around.

Only reason I didn't completely freak out is that I've had panic attacks before. Mind you I've never had one this bad but I was pretty sure that's what it was.

Earlier in the day I bent over and got a head rush when I stood up. That's not that unusual but it contained dizziness I am not accustomed to.

I put my head down on my keyboard momentarily this morning and it happened again. This was right before the attack hit.

And I've had leftover dizziness off and on for the remainder of the day.

Definitely going to get checked out.


please do get yourself checked over. you never know what's what with blood pressure or other vitals until they run the numbers. best of luck to you. don't worry, don't stress, but get it checked out.
 
2021-03-06 9:38:26 AM  

Avatox: Could be Menears, avoid alcohol and take a trip to see your doctor. It sucks, but is treatable.  Or it could be a heart condition fixed with drugs, too familar with it.


Having had it for 13 years, I can vouch for one thing:  Meiniere's Disease is not treatable.  And when a round of attacks start, hope (a) you aren't driving a car and (b) have a garbage can very near by.

A detection sign of Meiniere's versus BPPV or other types of vertigo is how long dizziness is sustained.  The last serious attack I had (in 2014) rendered me incapable of (a) standing up without falling over for about two weeks, (b) driving a car for nearly 6 months, and (c) walking in a straight line for more than about 45 feet without having to touch a wall for recalibration ever since.

Good luck with whatever you have going on, Subby.  And I hope like hell it's not Meiniere's.
 
2021-03-06 9:57:43 AM  

Starblazer: Let's tell my story.  I had a very minor stroke in 2017 that was misdiagnosed in the beginning.  Physical facts, 35yo, massively overweight but was losing weight at the time, no other major issues.

I went to bed just fine, woke up unable to walk straight and having to hold onto the walls to move through the house.  No "FAST" symptoms, which confused the doctor, myself, and a friend.  Couldn't close my eyes without puking (and this is coming from someone who vomited the last time in the year 2000, so I have one hell of a constitution.)

Went to the doctor, they thought it was an inner ear thing, got steroids.  Then my vision went. Didn't get better, didn't get better. Eventually got referred to a inner ear specialist that said "Oh, just calm down you're fine, but we can order a MRI if you want to calm your tits."  It wasn't that exact wording due to professional courtesy, but it was pretty damn close to that.

Had the MRI, MRI Dr. saw where it happened, but because it was so long after the event (at this time this was a month+ after), it was labeled as a 'chronic infarct'.  PCP said "Oh, we don't know when that happened".  ENT called a month after the MRI and said "Did anyone call you on that MRI we ordered?" (Yes, they were THAT bad).  During this post-MRI time, went to Physical therapy to start working on balance again, got a referral to another ENT who said Meneres.  Also went thru a battery of tests with the second ENT, BPPV came back negative, but Cochlear(?) came back abnormal, he still said Meneres.  At this time, we have a PCP that thinks it's BPV, an ENT that thinks its in my imagined head, a second ENT that thinks it's Meneres, and a Neurologist that thinks it was a Stroke.

My "Ah-ha" moment came to me when I went to my (new) Psychologist.  Went to him, started talking about my issues regarding the vertigo and the chain of events, without saying what I had been diagnosed with by the myriad of other doctors.  He asked to see my MRI, I gave it to him, he l ...


I'm curious, did you notice any personality changes (or your friends mention that you seem "different") after this? This sounds like an issue my wife had where she was carted out of work in an ambulance when she couldn't stand up. They ended up doing a nasal surgery and clearing out her sinus cavities but it persisted almost like you mentioned, until it just kind of suddenly cleared up. She never did get an MRI.
 
2021-03-06 10:10:42 AM  
I thought it was vertigo but it was just allergies. In season, if I forget my daily antihistamine, it sure feels like vertigo.
 
2021-03-06 10:38:39 AM  

Zombies ate my neighbors: Starblazer: Let's tell my story.  I had a very minor stroke in 2017 that was misdiagnosed in the beginning.  Physical facts, 35yo, massively overweight but was losing weight at the time, no other major issues.

I went to bed just fine, woke up unable to walk straight and having to hold onto the walls to move through the house.  No "FAST" symptoms, which confused the doctor, myself, and a friend.  Couldn't close my eyes without puking (and this is coming from someone who vomited the last time in the year 2000, so I have one hell of a constitution.)

Went to the doctor, they thought it was an inner ear thing, got steroids.  Then my vision went. Didn't get better, didn't get better. Eventually got referred to a inner ear specialist that said "Oh, just calm down you're fine, but we can order a MRI if you want to calm your tits."  It wasn't that exact wording due to professional courtesy, but it was pretty damn close to that.

Had the MRI, MRI Dr. saw where it happened, but because it was so long after the event (at this time this was a month+ after), it was labeled as a 'chronic infarct'.  PCP said "Oh, we don't know when that happened".  ENT called a month after the MRI and said "Did anyone call you on that MRI we ordered?" (Yes, they were THAT bad).  During this post-MRI time, went to Physical therapy to start working on balance again, got a referral to another ENT who said Meneres.  Also went thru a battery of tests with the second ENT, BPPV came back negative, but Cochlear(?) came back abnormal, he still said Meneres.  At this time, we have a PCP that thinks it's BPV, an ENT that thinks its in my imagined head, a second ENT that thinks it's Meneres, and a Neurologist that thinks it was a Stroke.

My "Ah-ha" moment came to me when I went to my (new) Psychologist.  Went to him, started talking about my issues regarding the vertigo and the chain of events, without saying what I had been diagnosed with by the myriad of other doctors.  He asked to see my MRI, I gave it to him, he l ...

I'm curious, did you notice any personality changes (or your friends mention that you seem "different") after this? This sounds like an issue my wife had where she was carted out of work in an ambulance when she couldn't stand up. They ended up doing a nasal surgery and clearing out her sinus cavities but it persisted almost like you mentioned, until it just kind of suddenly cleared up. She never did get an MRI.


The only personality change that I've noticed is that I'm not taking nearly as much crap from people.

My balance issues didn't clear up within a day or a week. It was months, basically just like I had to relearn in my brain how to walk and balance properly.

I just got a text from an ex-girlfriend that I'm still friends with. She says she didn't notice anything immediate after the stroke but more or less just not taking poo from people.
 
2021-03-06 10:50:26 AM  
I was on the top floor of The Cathedral of Learning on Pitt's campus (not a student, just hanging research signs all over campus) and I looked over the stair railing (alllllllll the way down)

The floor turned into water.   It literally looked like ebbs and tides and I couldn't find a solid.

I fell to the outer wall as opposed to the inner railing which you would THINK would be the safer option.
I walked down almost the entire building, back to the wall, arms outstretched the whole way down, passing hundreds of students with confused looks on their faces.

Got back to my office and my boss (a nurse) said "OH MY GOD!  What happened to YOU?!?" and she sent me home.

The vertigo subsided on my way downstairs but I didn't feel "right" the rest of the day
 
2021-03-06 11:15:40 AM  
Not applicable to your condition, but I got vertigo one time standing on the edge of a cliff watching a 200' waterfall.  I guess it was the moving water that covered my field of view.  Everything suddenly started spinning and I couldn't tell which way was up.  I felt like I was falling over but couldn't tell which direction.  I closed my eyes tried to sit down.  Fortunately I landed on the edge of the cliff but could just as easily have gone over the edge.

It was a bit of a surprise since I work on smokestacks for a living and thought I was immune to heights.
 
2021-03-06 11:18:57 AM  
I didn't feel like I was going to die, but I did want to punch Bono in the face.
U2 - Vertigo
Youtube 98W9QuMq-2k
 
2021-03-06 11:33:56 AM  

NeedlesslyCanadian: Kind of?

On Monday for pretty much all day I was finding that I was perfectly fine if I was sitting or laying down, no matter what - laptop, watching TV, whatever. But any time I got up, vertigo (or something like it) staggered me so hard that I'd have to lean against a wall to keep from falling over.

Weird, disconcerting. Not sure if it counts as vertigo per se, but it was certainly in the neighbourhood.


Sounds like hypotension, which would need to be checked out if new.
 
2021-03-06 11:38:31 AM  
Not firsthand experience, but knew somebody who dealt with it.  His primary trigger was too much sodium.  I'm not sure if everyone has the same trigger, but that was his...
 
2021-03-06 11:39:16 AM  

Starblazer: Let's tell my story.  I had a very minor stroke in 2017 that was misdiagnosed in the beginning.  Physical facts, 35yo, massively overweight but was losing weight at the time, no other major issues.

I went to bed just fine, woke up unable to walk straight and having to hold onto the walls to move through the house.  No "FAST" symptoms, which confused the doctor, myself, and a friend.  Couldn't close my eyes without puking (and this is coming from someone who vomited the last time in the year 2000, so I have one hell of a constitution.)

Went to the doctor, they thought it was an inner ear thing, got steroids.  Then my vision went. Didn't get better, didn't get better. Eventually got referred to a inner ear specialist that said "Oh, just calm down you're fine, but we can order a MRI if you want to calm your tits."  It wasn't that exact wording due to professional courtesy, but it was pretty damn close to that.

Had the MRI, MRI Dr. saw where it happened, but because it was so long after the event (at this time this was a month+ after), it was labeled as a 'chronic infarct'.  PCP said "Oh, we don't know when that happened".  ENT called a month after the MRI and said "Did anyone call you on that MRI we ordered?" (Yes, they were THAT bad).  During this post-MRI time, went to Physical therapy to start working on balance again, got a referral to another ENT who said Meneres.  Also went thru a battery of tests with the second ENT, BPPV came back negative, but Cochlear(?) came back abnormal, he still said Meneres.  At this time, we have a PCP that thinks it's BPV, an ENT that thinks its in my imagined head, a second ENT that thinks it's Meneres, and a Neurologist that thinks it was a Stroke.

My "Ah-ha" moment came to me when I went to my (new) Psychologist.  Went to him, started talking about my issues regarding the vertigo and the chain of events, without saying what I had been diagnosed with by the myriad of other doctors.  He asked to see my MRI, I gave it to him, he looked at it and said "Oh, yea, you stroked out."  I gave him a puzzled look and said "Okay, what qualifies you to say that?"  'Look behind you and read my degree'.  *turns around*.... "Neuropsychologist", Neurologist.  I wasn't aware of that when I booked him, so that's why it threw me off.  I just thought he was some bog standard Psych, not a Neuro-Psych.

At this point, I'm happy I might get some answers, so I challenge him.  He's was the type of person that's very intelligent, but lacks in people skills and in some days, would rather just tell you "this is your treatment, let's give this a shot" after 3-4 minutes of your input.  I must have got him on a good day or he realized that I was exasperated from the whole ordeal and wanted logical answers to his conclusion.  He calmly laid out his thoughts, answered my probing questions when I went down the chain of events, explained why the Dr's thought what they thought, explained why certain tests came out that way, and then gave his conclusion, which also mirrored the other Neurologist.

PCP wasn't sold but eventually came around as soon as I got better in a stroke-like fashion.  ENT1 I gave up on after they didn't follow up for a month.  ENT2 still thinks its Meneres, but I haven't gone back for another round of audiology tests to clear the air on that end.  Both Neuros still say stroke.

It took awhile but I'm back to 99.8% normal with no lasting effects.  My closed-eye balance took the longest to return to normal.  Come to find out that this kind of stroke is heavily misdiagnosed because of the lack of 'FAST'.

Good luck.


Follow up with ENT2.

Disease isn't always an "or" problem. "and" can be a thing.
 
2021-03-06 11:42:33 AM  

mofa: I had it for nearly two months (24/7) about 25 years ago, and it was thoroughly miserable. I'd basically spend my days walking with my hand steadying myself against walls and railings, and was worried that everyone might think I was drunk all the time. I ended up having a coworker drive me to work after the first couple of weeks.

I had MRIs and a full range of testing at UCLA, and the results were ... nothing, which to them meant that a cilia inside my labyrinthe tubes (inner ear) was likely stuck in one of the internal valves,** and that in some unknown amount of time, it would magically go away when the cilia worked itself free. And that's exactly what happened about three weeks later. Hasn't ever recurred.

// ** The valve being stuck open was a signal that my body was not only spinning on that axis, but that the spinning was always accelerating.


We figured out a lot of the failure modes of the ear when we developed three axis inertial navigation Systems and started to see the failure modes when an axis failed at full zero or full max signal.
 
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