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(SFGate)   Big Basin State Park redwoods still burning, after six months   (sfgate.com) divider line
    More: Scary, Santa Cruz Mountains, Park, Big Basin Redwoods State Park, CZU Lightning Complex fires, Combustion, extreme conditions of the fire, Parks, State park  
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2584 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Mar 2021 at 1:50 AM (9 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-03-05 9:19:07 PM  
No one can kind one of these?

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-03-05 9:39:30 PM  
And I can't get a decent sized log to burn consistently in my wood stove for an hour without near-constant attention. There is no justice.
 
2021-03-05 9:47:08 PM  
Thank God the smoke is gone

/It was seriously horrible for a while
 
2021-03-05 9:56:55 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: And I can't get a decent sized log to burn consistently in my wood stove for an hour without near-constant attention. There is no justice.


Try redwood next time
 
2021-03-05 9:58:45 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Thank God the smoke is gone

/It was seriously horrible for a while


Last year had some of us seriously rethinking our future in California.

But really where else can we go that's better? We would be running from one climate disaster risk toward another.
 
2021-03-05 11:16:20 PM  

make me some tea: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Thank God the smoke is gone

/It was seriously horrible for a while

Last year had some of us seriously rethinking our future in California.

But really where else can we go that's better? We would be running from one climate disaster risk toward another.


This. On a local reddit group people are talking about moving the Washington or Idaho or Texas. Yeah, you think there aren't fires and smoke there (or tornados, ice storms that freeze animals in the fields, massive flooding)? You need to read some national news every once in a while.
 
2021-03-06 2:05:22 AM  
Why don't they just move to a different planet?
 
2021-03-06 2:15:50 AM  
Damn, I wish I could make a fire half this good in my smoker.
 
2021-03-06 2:19:01 AM  

make me some tea: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Thank God the smoke is gone

/It was seriously horrible for a while

Last year had some of us seriously rethinking our future in California.

But really where else can we go that's better? We would be running from one climate disaster risk toward another.


The Great Lakes area.  Massive freshwater supply and a lack of catastrophic natural disasters.  Horrible winters are a small price to pay compared to the environmental disasters that are unfolding and will only increase in magnitude.
 
2021-03-06 2:24:13 AM  
Disasters are everywhere.

Here in Auckland it gets as low as 1'C, and as high as 35!

And yesterday we were hit by a tsunami well over 1CM high after the Earthquake near Hawaii. The whole east coast of northland evacuated for that one (true story).

A few years back we had a tornado, and one entire person died. I mean, we haven't had any tornados since, but they're sneaky devils.
 
2021-03-06 2:31:12 AM  

Spermbot: make me some tea: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Thank God the smoke is gone

/It was seriously horrible for a while

Last year had some of us seriously rethinking our future in California.

But really where else can we go that's better? We would be running from one climate disaster risk toward another.

The Great Lakes area.  Massive freshwater supply and a lack of catastrophic natural disasters.  Horrible winters are a small price to pay compared to the environmental disasters that are unfolding and will only increase in magnitude.


https://www.weather.gov/grb/peshtigof​i​re
 
2021-03-06 2:37:38 AM  

make me some tea: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Thank God the smoke is gone

/It was seriously horrible for a while

Last year had some of us seriously rethinking our future in California.

But really where else can we go that's better? We would be running from one climate disaster risk toward another.


We have reached our quota of Californians in Washington, sorry.
 
2021-03-06 2:39:33 AM  

dyhchong: Disasters are everywhere.

Here in Auckland it gets as low as 1'C, and as high as 35!

And yesterday we were hit by a tsunami well over 1CM high after the Earthquake near Hawaii. The whole east coast of northland evacuated for that one (true story).

A few years back we had a tornado, and one entire person died. I mean, we haven't had any tornados since, but they're sneaky devils.


My parents LOVED New Zealand and their one minor complaint had nothing to do with the weather:

They said the roads were too narrow.
 
2021-03-06 3:02:11 AM  

Spermbot: make me some tea: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Thank God the smoke is gone

/It was seriously horrible for a while

Last year had some of us seriously rethinking our future in California.

But really where else can we go that's better? We would be running from one climate disaster risk toward another.

The Great Lakes area.  Massive freshwater supply and a lack of catastrophic natural disasters.  Horrible winters are a small price to pay compared to the environmental disasters that are unfolding and will only increase in magnitude.


Yeah but horrible winters though,

Seriously though you're correct, the northern Midwest region has been identified as the best position in the United States to fall back to in terms of escaping what's coming, and the winters will likely be milder overall, polar vortex events notwithstanding.
 
2021-03-06 3:03:14 AM  

The_Sponge: make me some tea: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Thank God the smoke is gone

/It was seriously horrible for a while

Last year had some of us seriously rethinking our future in California.

But really where else can we go that's better? We would be running from one climate disaster risk toward another.

We have reached our quota of Californians in Washington, sorry.


You PNW people have been saying that since the 1970s. ;)
 
2021-03-06 3:04:47 AM  
If you're looking for the culprit look no further than California's ridiculous policy l of f not using controlled burns:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.sfch​r​onicle.com/california-wildfires/amp/Ca​lifornia-must-burn-more-of-its-forests​-to-save-15829961.php

(I'm sure you were thinking because global warming)
 
2021-03-06 3:13:30 AM  

GrizzlyPouch: If you're looking for the culprit look no further than California's ridiculous policy l of f not using controlled burns:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.sfchr​onicle.com/california-wildfires/amp/Ca​lifornia-must-burn-more-of-its-forests​-to-save-15829961.php

(I'm sure you were thinking because global warming)


We do controlled burns every year, all over the state. But it's not so simple because quite a bit of land in high risk areas (especially coastal ranges) is privately owned and so they can't be managed by any state or federal agency. The government can't just trespass on your property and set the grass on fire.
 
2021-03-06 3:14:33 AM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Thank God the smoke is gone

/It was seriously horrible for a while


Below is a video of my south San Jose neighborhood on September 9th. Creepy AF. I've lived in the south bay all my life gong back before cars had smog equipment and that was far and away the worst air quality day. Two massive fires on the mountains that make silicon valley.

End of Days.
Youtube 5d9-NKJ5jSQ
 
2021-03-06 3:19:00 AM  

phishrace: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Thank God the smoke is gone

/It was seriously horrible for a while

Below is a video of my south San Jose neighborhood on September 9th. Creepy AF. I've lived in the south bay all my life gong back before cars had smog equipment and that was far and away the worst air quality day. Two massive fires on the mountains that make silicon valley.

[iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/5d9-NKJ5​jSQ?autoplay=1&widget_referrer=https%3​A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&start=0&enablejsap​i=1&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&​widgetid=1]


We had the same scene in Sacramento day after day for months, and ash fallout on the cars to boot. It was amazing to finally see the stars at night again after so many weeks of that.
 
2021-03-06 3:20:05 AM  

make me some tea: GrizzlyPouch: If you're looking for the culprit look no further than California's ridiculous policy l of f not using controlled burns:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.sfchr​onicle.com/california-wildfires/amp/Ca​lifornia-must-burn-more-of-its-forests​-to-save-15829961.php

(I'm sure you were thinking because global warming)

We do controlled burns every year, all over the state. But it's not so simple because quite a bit of land in high risk areas (especially coastal ranges) is privately owned and so they can't be managed by any state or federal agency. The government can't just trespass on your property and set the grass on fire.


What I took away from this Chronicle article was that more people are now recognizing that it needs to be done on a larger scale.

It also does mention global warming as a factor (or climate change, if you prefer the more neutral sounding term), because of the longer fire seasons that it has caused over recent years.
 
2021-03-06 3:20:11 AM  

GrizzlyPouch: If you're looking for the culprit look no further than California's ridiculous policy l of f not using controlled burns:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.sfchr​onicle.com/california-wildfires/amp/Ca​lifornia-must-burn-more-of-its-forests​-to-save-15829961.php

(I'm sure you were thinking because global warming)


"Controlled" burns are a last resort. Mainly because they tend to want to become uncontrolled burns. Especially in mountainous terrain like a lot of California.

I learned what I know about wildland fire on the fireline rather than off the internet, so obviously you're far more knowledgeable than I.
 
2021-03-06 3:22:05 AM  

Fivekiller: Spermbot: make me some tea: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Thank God the smoke is gone

/It was seriously horrible for a while

Last year had some of us seriously rethinking our future in California.

But really where else can we go that's better? We would be running from one climate disaster risk toward another.

The Great Lakes area.  Massive freshwater supply and a lack of catastrophic natural disasters.  Horrible winters are a small price to pay compared to the environmental disasters that are unfolding and will only increase in magnitude.

https://www.weather.gov/grb/peshtigofi​re


1871 - srsly?!
 
2021-03-06 3:23:54 AM  
Breaks my heart. I was lucky enough to go a few times over the last few years, and it was a magical place -- like Muir Woods, but much larger and way less crowded.

Sempervirens Falls is just off the road:
Fark user imageView Full Size


And that pic in the article, with the burned-out trunks? Probably not exactly the same shot, but similar idea:
Fark user imageView Full Size


And if you've never had a chance to visit the redwood forests, here's a pic with a nice sense of scale. Both these guys are typical height (so 5'9", about 175cm):
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-03-06 3:31:34 AM  

cyberspacedout: make me some tea: GrizzlyPouch: If you're looking for the culprit look no further than California's ridiculous policy l of f not using controlled burns:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.sfchr​onicle.com/california-wildfires/amp/Ca​lifornia-must-burn-more-of-its-forests​-to-save-15829961.php

(I'm sure you were thinking because global warming)

We do controlled burns every year, all over the state. But it's not so simple because quite a bit of land in high risk areas (especially coastal ranges) is privately owned and so they can't be managed by any state or federal agency. The government can't just trespass on your property and set the grass on fire.

What I took away from this Chronicle article was that more people are now recognizing that it needs to be done on a larger scale.

It also does mention global warming as a factor (or climate change, if you prefer the more neutral sounding term), because of the longer fire seasons that it has caused over recent years.


Yeah it does, but it's not an easy thing to do given the complexity of land management in California. I don't know how they could expand the effort but there is general awareness here that it needs to be done. We've got open eyes on the issue.

BTW it's climate change caused by global warming, so those two terms are related, it's not just a fashion statement.

Climate change is exacerbating droughts worldwide, and also creating more intense weather events which impact areas in ways not previously seen.

The lightning complexes were the result of a really unusual summer lightning storm in August 2020 which occurred when an eastern Pacific hurricane collided with an east-moving trough which peeled off the moisture and turbulence from the tropical system and stretched it out into a 1,000mi line pulled in toward the California coast. This something like 14,000 lightning strikes, mostly dry lightning but we also did get a good squall come through and soak the area. I remember that night, it was a wild storm, and we almost never get storms like that in the summer. We thought the lightning was a spectacle but then the fires kicked up and it started to really get terrible.

BTW speaking of rain we've got a good soaker coming through Bay Area and Sacramento Valley right now, hopefully that'll put out some of the smoldering logs described in TFA.
 
2021-03-06 3:34:39 AM  

tkil: Breaks my heart. I was lucky enough to go a few times over the last few years, and it was a magical place -- like Muir Woods, but much larger and way less crowded.

Sempervirens Falls is just off the road:
[Fark user image 850x478]

And that pic in the article, with the burned-out trunks? Probably not exactly the same shot, but similar idea:
[Fark user image 850x566]

And if you've never had a chance to visit the redwood forests, here's a pic with a nice sense of scale. Both these guys are typical height (so 5'9", about 175cm):
[Fark user image 850x566]


I never got a chance to go there.

Sucks. :(
 
2021-03-06 4:44:18 AM  
thetensionandthespark.files.wordpress.comView Full Size
 
2021-03-06 4:49:21 AM  

make me some tea: The_Sponge: make me some tea: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Thank God the smoke is gone

/It was seriously horrible for a while

Last year had some of us seriously rethinking our future in California.

But really where else can we go that's better? We would be running from one climate disaster risk toward another.

We have reached our quota of Californians in Washington, sorry.

You PNW people have been saying that since the 1970s. ;)


I've lived in the PNW for around 25 years.. but because I'm blonde and have a vaguely southwestern accent, every fifth person I run into seems to think I'm from Cali. Even though I've never stepped foot in the state.
 
2021-03-06 6:38:01 AM  
Not that unusual for wildland fires, the fire gets in and under the duff then it acts something like a in ground peat fire.
Especially for a naturally caused fire in a designated wilderness area or its equivalent, where unless there is a very good reason to put the fire out, the firefighters let it keep burning or smoldering.

Remember many fires are good for the forest.
 
2021-03-06 7:17:23 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size

WV safe from tornadoes on the east coast if you can stay off the opioids.
 
2021-03-06 7:50:58 AM  
Taking opioids prevents tornadoes. Got it.
 
2021-03-06 8:40:27 AM  

Spermbot: make me some tea: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Thank God the smoke is gone

/It was seriously horrible for a while

Last year had some of us seriously rethinking our future in California.

But really where else can we go that's better? We would be running from one climate disaster risk toward another.

The Great Lakes area.  Massive freshwater supply and a lack of catastrophic natural disasters.  Horrible winters are a small price to pay compared to the environmental disasters that are unfolding and will only increase in magnitude.


No.  Ohio, Michigan and Wisconsin are miserable cultural wastelands flooded with meth whores with absolutely nothing but trash to offer.  No one should come here.  Except for no natural disasters, abundant fresh water, and a climate that is relatively mild almost all year long.  (Feb is generally horrible, I'll grant you.  It's a great time to travel.)
 
2021-03-06 8:58:02 AM  

Fivekiller: Spermbot: make me some tea: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Thank God the smoke is gone

/It was seriously horrible for a while

Last year had some of us seriously rethinking our future in California.

But really where else can we go that's better? We would be running from one climate disaster risk toward another.

The Great Lakes area.  Massive freshwater supply and a lack of catastrophic natural disasters.  Horrible winters are a small price to pay compared to the environmental disasters that are unfolding and will only increase in magnitude.

https://www.weather.gov/grb/peshtigofi​re


spoiler: no one in Wisconsin cares if Peshtigo goes up in flames again
 
2021-03-06 9:00:50 AM  

phishrace: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Thank God the smoke is gone

/It was seriously horrible for a while

Below is a video of my south San Jose neighborhood on September 9th. Creepy AF. I've lived in the south bay all my life gong back before cars had smog equipment and that was far and away the worst air quality day. Two massive fires on the mountains that make silicon valley.

[iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/5d9-NKJ5​jSQ?autoplay=1&widget_referrer=https%3​A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&start=0&enablejsap​i=1&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&​widgetid=1]


My family drove through San Jose two times, around '82.  The smog was worse than that.  ( ._.)

/were much brighter days though
//cheerier, one might even say
 
2021-03-06 9:00:52 AM  
Our upper midwest winters are bad, you should definitely move to Texas or Florida instead. And not here. Because boohoo cold.
 
2021-03-06 9:06:10 AM  

The_Sponge: dyhchong: Disasters are everywhere.

Here in Auckland it gets as low as 1'C, and as high as 35!

And yesterday we were hit by a tsunami well over 1CM high after the Earthquake near Hawaii. The whole east coast of northland evacuated for that one (true story).

A few years back we had a tornado, and one entire person died. I mean, we haven't had any tornados since, but they're sneaky devils.

My parents LOVED New Zealand and their one minor complaint had nothing to do with the weather:

They said the roads were too narrow.


Luckily they never ran across any of the roving Sumatran rat-monkeys.
 
2021-03-06 9:08:48 AM  

Fivekiller: Spermbot: make me some tea: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Thank God the smoke is gone

/It was seriously horrible for a while

Last year had some of us seriously rethinking our future in California.

But really where else can we go that's better? We would be running from one climate disaster risk toward another.

The Great Lakes area.  Massive freshwater supply and a lack of catastrophic natural disasters.  Horrible winters are a small price to pay compared to the environmental disasters that are unfolding and will only increase in magnitude.

https://www.weather.gov/grb/peshtigofi​re


Peshtigo, the Michigan thumb fire, and the Hinckley fire, all happened during each state's lumber boom. When they harvested trees they would leave the scrap just lying around. During favorable weather conditions each state went up like matches. The great Chicago fire happened the same time as Peshtigo. There's not a huge chance of this happening today unless we got an insane drought.

/Sorry, special interest of mine
 
2021-03-06 9:10:54 AM  
Those Jewish space lasers work amazingly well!
 
2021-03-06 9:21:28 AM  

GrendelMk1: GrizzlyPouch: If you're looking for the culprit look no further than California's ridiculous policy l of f not using controlled burns:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.sfchr​onicle.com/california-wildfires/amp/Ca​lifornia-must-burn-more-of-its-forests​-to-save-15829961.php

(I'm sure you were thinking because global warming)

"Controlled" burns are a last resort. Mainly because they tend to want to become uncontrolled burns. Especially in mountainous terrain like a lot of California.

I learned what I know about wildland fire on the fireline rather than off the internet, so obviously you're far more knowledgeable than I.


Exactly.  This is why California has wild fires. People don't like to do controlled burns.
 
2021-03-06 9:42:51 AM  

Spermbot: make me some tea: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Thank God the smoke is gone

/It was seriously horrible for a while

Last year had some of us seriously rethinking our future in California.

But really where else can we go that's better? We would be running from one climate disaster risk toward another.

The Great Lakes area.  Massive freshwater supply and a lack of catastrophic natural disasters.  Horrible winters are a small price to pay compared to the environmental disasters that are unfolding and will only increase in magnitude.


There is a reason half the state of Michigan can be found hanging out in Florida from November-March.
 
2021-03-06 10:10:13 AM  
The reason Big Basin Redwoods State Park is still 'on fire' is embers get inside the massive logs and smolder for months.  Massive still-living trees with burned-out interiors are one of the awesome features of the park.  This is how we get those.

Barring some man-made disaster the scars from this fire will be visible in trees hundreds or even thousands of years from now.

(Here is a random pic off the web showing a similar scar from a fire hundreds of years ago)

cdn.kqed.orgView Full Size
 
2021-03-06 11:26:21 AM  

Hell Poodle: Fivekiller: Spermbot: make me some tea: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Thank God the smoke is gone

/It was seriously horrible for a while

Last year had some of us seriously rethinking our future in California.

But really where else can we go that's better? We would be running from one climate disaster risk toward another.

The Great Lakes area.  Massive freshwater supply and a lack of catastrophic natural disasters.  Horrible winters are a small price to pay compared to the environmental disasters that are unfolding and will only increase in magnitude.

https://www.weather.gov/grb/peshtigofi​re

Peshtigo, the Michigan thumb fire, and the Hinckley fire, all happened during each state's lumber boom. When they harvested trees they would leave the scrap just lying around. During favorable weather conditions each state went up like matches. The great Chicago fire happened the same time as Peshtigo. There's not a huge chance of this happening today unless we got an insane drought.

/Sorry, special interest of mine


Impressed that someone knows about the Hinckley fire. I grew up around there. They clear-cut most of the old growth in the state back then. They replanted, but it's weird to go in the forest and there's no under canopy, all the trees are the same height and planted in rows...
 
2021-03-06 11:40:18 AM  
cyberspacedout

It also does mention global warming as a factor (or climate change, if you prefer the more neutral sounding term), because of the longer fire seasons that it has caused over recent years.

It's a fuel issue. Plain and simple.

A warming climate absolutely will give you a higher probability of conditions being ripe for fire. I concur. That said, even if you eliminated that you still have the resulting clusterf*ck of the stupidity of our forest management that has put us in this situation in the first place.

Suppressing fire for the 100 years or so has destroyed forest health and productivity and created insane fuel loads which change ground fires into catastrophic crown fires. Not dealing with ladder fuels on our urban interfaces as well as thinning and species selection on them has left us in situations where we have massive, and very much preventable, catastrophic losses.

We need to immediately attend to the urban interface issue. Then we need to let the forests burn (when we can) like they have since time immemorial. Fire is essential to forest health and succession. Some evidence to support the interface management: 80% of the Firesmart compliant homes in the Fort Mac fires survived.

https://firesmartbc.ca/

30 years in forestry, BC S-100.
 
2021-03-06 11:40:56 AM  

make me some tea: The_Sponge: make me some tea: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Thank God the smoke is gone

/It was seriously horrible for a while

Last year had some of us seriously rethinking our future in California.

But really where else can we go that's better? We would be running from one climate disaster risk toward another.

We have reached our quota of Californians in Washington, sorry.

You PNW people have been saying that since the 1970s. ;)


Did you know that Oregon's got an empty quarter?  ...thiere very welcoming
 
2021-03-06 1:06:14 PM  

make me some tea: phishrace: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Thank God the smoke is gone

/It was seriously horrible for a while

Below is a video of my south San Jose neighborhood on September 9th. Creepy AF. I've lived in the south bay all my life gong back before cars had smog equipment and that was far and away the worst air quality day. Two massive fires on the mountains that make silicon valley.

[iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/5d9-NKJ5​jSQ?autoplay=1&widget_referrer=https%3​A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&start=0&enablejsap​i=1&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&​widgetid=1]

We had the same scene in Sacramento day after day for months, and ash fallout on the cars to boot. It was amazing to finally see the stars at night again after so many weeks of that.


I get that here in Clearlake far more often than I'm comfortable with. The last decade or so has seen over 50% of the county burn.
 
2021-03-06 2:43:27 PM  

Prof. Frink: Taking opioids prevents tornadoes. Got it.


It has a 100% success rate for me here in L.A.
 
2021-03-06 4:01:24 PM  

phishrace: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Thank God the smoke is gone

/It was seriously horrible for a while

Below is a video of my south San Jose neighborhood on September 9th. Creepy AF. I've lived in the south bay all my life gong back before cars had smog equipment and that was far and away the worst air quality day. Two massive fires on the mountains that make silicon valley.


Here's a pic from 09SEP about 1pm I took from inside my truck while driving around in Cupertino near where I live. Certainly was creepy AF for several days, not including the weeks of sub-standard air quality overall.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-03-06 6:33:55 PM  

fugeeface: phishrace: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Thank God the smoke is gone

/It was seriously horrible for a while

Below is a video of my south San Jose neighborhood on September 9th. Creepy AF. I've lived in the south bay all my life gong back before cars had smog equipment and that was far and away the worst air quality day. Two massive fires on the mountains that make silicon valley.

Here's a pic from 09SEP about 1pm I took from inside my truck while driving around in Cupertino near where I live. Certainly was creepy AF for several days, not including the weeks of sub-standard air quality overall.

[Fark user image image 850x637]


I'm guessing you took that pic with a cell phone. Most cell phones, including iphones, couldn't capture the orange hue in the sky. Automatic filtering would make the sky look more blue. My cheap android phone wasn't even close. The drone camera used in the video had no automatic filters, so the orange really came through.

It's probably good most phones couldn't capture it because social media would've got overrun with orange sky pictures. The whole bay area was orange.

sanfrancisco.cbslocal.comView Full Size
 
2021-03-06 6:48:27 PM  

gameshowhost: phishrace: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Thank God the smoke is gone

/It was seriously horrible for a while

Below is a video of my south San Jose neighborhood on September 9th. Creepy AF. I've lived in the south bay all my life gong back before cars had smog equipment and that was far and away the worst air quality day. Two massive fires on the mountains that make silicon valley.

[iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/5d9-NKJ5​jSQ?autoplay=1&widget_referrer=https%3​A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&start=0&enablejsap​i=1&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&​widgetid=1]

My family drove through San Jose two times, around '82.  The smog was worse than that.  ( ._.)

/were much brighter days though
//cheerier, one might even say


I've lived in the south bay long enough to remember when it snowed on the valley floor in '76 and way back in the early 60's. The smog was the worst in the early 70's. The population was surging and smog equipment wasn't as efficient as it is today. Seeing smog in the air was normal for most every sunny day (300+ days a year). Still, none of those days came close to Sep 9th last year.

The landscape and weather patterns here encourage smog, but the bay area has done an excellent job of cleaning up the skies. Barring fires, it's only 90+ degree days now where you start to see smog, which doesn't happen a lot.
 
2021-03-06 6:58:59 PM  

phishrace: gameshowhost: phishrace: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Thank God the smoke is gone

/It was seriously horrible for a while

Below is a video of my south San Jose neighborhood on September 9th. Creepy AF. I've lived in the south bay all my life gong back before cars had smog equipment and that was far and away the worst air quality day. Two massive fires on the mountains that make silicon valley.

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My family drove through San Jose two times, around '82.  The smog was worse than that.  ( ._.)

/were much brighter days though
//cheerier, one might even say

I've lived in the south bay long enough to remember when it snowed on the valley floor in '76 and way back in the early 60's. The smog was the worst in the early 70's. The population was surging and smog equipment wasn't as efficient as it is today. Seeing smog in the air was normal for most every sunny day (300+ days a year). Still, none of those days came close to Sep 9th last year.

The landscape and weather patterns here encourage smog, but the bay area has done an excellent job of cleaning up the skies. Barring fires, it's only 90+ degree days now where you start to see smog, which doesn't happen a lot.


damn... when we drove through, i was choking for breath - and i'm not asthmatic or anything.. can't imagine when it was worse
 
2021-03-06 7:03:46 PM  

phishrace: fugeeface: phishrace: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Thank God the smoke is gone

/It was seriously horrible for a while

Below is a video of my south San Jose neighborhood on September 9th. Creepy AF. I've lived in the south bay all my life gong back before cars had smog equipment and that was far and away the worst air quality day. Two massive fires on the mountains that make silicon valley.

Here's a pic from 09SEP about 1pm I took from inside my truck while driving around in Cupertino near where I live. Certainly was creepy AF for several days, not including the weeks of sub-standard air quality overall.

[Fark user image image 850x637]

I'm guessing you took that pic with a cell phone. Most cell phones, including iphones, couldn't capture the orange hue in the sky. Automatic filtering would make the sky look more blue. My cheap android phone wasn't even close. The drone camera used in the video had no automatic filters, so the orange really came through.

It's probably good most phones couldn't capture it because social media would've got overrun with orange sky pictures. The whole bay area was orange.

[sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com image 850x566]


You can adjust the white balance on a mobile phone. It's usually called some derivative of Professional Mode and is considered a standard feature these days..

On my S10e I just went to 'More' and dragged it into the list. Can see the White Balance adjustment on the bottom right under WB..

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
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