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(Some Guy)   Subby's PC crashed last week. Got the new one yesterday. While exploring the recovered files he had forgotten he had, he found this: an off-the-wall and strangely emotional SF explanation for the Fermi Paradox. 6770 words. Enjoy   (lightspeedmagazine.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Universe, great valley, Sol-Gov flivver drop, first instant, joy of joys, serried rank of starships, twenty-second century, oldPelenor  
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774 clicks; posted to Fandom » on 05 Mar 2021 at 2:38 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



32 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-03-05 12:30:12 PM  
Needs more weed.
 
2021-03-05 1:54:30 PM  
 
2021-03-05 2:50:18 PM  
Ha!

I thought that rather lovely. Many thanks for sharing it.
 
2021-03-05 2:50:47 PM  
That's in a collection of Brin stories I bought 20+ years ago.  Good yarn.
 
2021-03-05 3:03:39 PM  
Nice
 
2021-03-05 3:08:52 PM  

meh...: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/they-​r​e-made-out-of-meat


https://www.abelard.org/asimov.php
 
2021-03-05 3:22:04 PM  
I suspect that the Internet explains the Fermi Paradox.

Whenever a species gets advanced enough that their members are tied into a communications network, stupid members of the species from backwaters interact with more advanced members of the species, become enraged from their own inadequacy, and rise up, killing off the individuals who create that technological society.

You're left with a society that isn't emitting much in the way of signals, and you've selected for low intelligence, and already exploited the easily available resources, so getting back to being a technological society becomes less likely with each cycle.
 
2021-03-05 3:54:00 PM  

Malenfant: I suspect that the Internet explains the Fermi Paradox.

Whenever a species gets advanced enough that their members are tied into a communications network, stupid members of the species from backwaters interact with more advanced members of the species, become enraged from their own inadequacy, and rise up, killing off the individuals who create that technological society.

You're left with a society that isn't emitting much in the way of signals, and you've selected for low intelligence, and already exploited the easily available resources, so getting back to being a technological society becomes less likely with each cycle.


That's an angle Stephenson could have done something with as a humorous aside in Anathem.
 
2021-03-05 4:10:39 PM  
That was pretty good.  Took me a bit to get comfortable with the Orwellian doublespeak, but it was a cool story in the end.  Makes me wonder how long our Voyager probes have 'til they reach our "crystalsphere."
 
2021-03-05 4:22:24 PM  

FrancoFile: That's in a collection of Brin stories I bought 20+ years ago.  Good yarn.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-03-05 5:09:18 PM  
Thanks for that subby
 
DVD
2021-03-05 5:10:47 PM  
Subby, thank you VERY MUCH for this.  It's quite an interesting read.

Here's one in return.

Radio Silence
 
2021-03-05 5:31:07 PM  

common sense is an oxymoron: FrancoFile: That's in a collection of Brin stories I bought 20+ years ago.  Good yarn.

[Fark user image 286x482]


"Senses 3 and 6" is another good one related to the Fermi paradox in that collection.
 
2021-03-05 6:01:43 PM  
I have no Mouth but I Must Scream-Harlan Ellison

I know, it's not the same but I just wanted to post it
 
2021-03-05 7:48:56 PM  
Affirmative paradox is quite well explained if you assume two simple principles:

1. There shall never be a method invented to travel faster than light. It is physically impossible.

2. Any civilization has at most 5,000 years or so of sentience, before it transcends into via The singularity to the next stage of existence.

The civilizations are simply too far apart to ever come in contact with each other.
 
2021-03-05 7:50:03 PM  

BunkyBrewman: I have no Mouth but I Must Scream-Harlan Ellison

I know, it's not the same but I just wanted to post it


Aye. He was always good for a hoot.
 
2021-03-05 8:43:19 PM  
Good read! Thanks subby!

As a young teen, I read some of Brin's stuff in a crate of old Analogs I got for free when my middle school cleaned out their library in the mid 90s. I had dozens of issues (other sci-fi/fantasy pulps too, not just Analog), the oldest from the late 60s, all the way up through the early 90s. I miss sitting down with a new-to-me issue, reading the letters, short stories, novellas, etc. Sci-fi short stories often proved more enjoyable than full novels or series.
 
2021-03-05 11:17:39 PM  
Someone posted a story here on Fark a long-ish time ago and it was excellent. It was about an advanced civilization that forms and then evolves around a deep sea vent, and the impossibility of that civilization  communicating with another deep sea vent civilization or to adapt to the vent eventually becoming dormant. The civilization was destined to rise and fall, permanently isolated, due to the enormous freezing darkness between vents.

Clearly allegorical for life in the expanse of space. Anyone?
 
2021-03-05 11:35:43 PM  
FrancoFile: PartTimeBuddha:Harlee:meh...: edmo: rosekolodny: Malenfant: Psychopusher:
common sense is an oxymoron: Vitamin_R: DVD: BunkyBrewman: Sim Tree: amyldoanitrite:


Any chance one of you recognizes this summary of a story posted on Fark some time in the last few years:

An advanced civilization forms and then evolves around the warmth a deep sea vent, and discusses the impossibility of that civilization communicating with another deep sea vent civilization or to adapt to the vent eventually becoming dormant. The civilization was destined to rise and fall, permanently isolated, due to the enormous freezing darkness between vents.

Clearly allegorical for life in the expanse of space. Beautifully written, completely immersive, haven't been able to find it again.
 
2021-03-06 12:48:44 AM  

The Darkest Timeline: FrancoFile: PartTimeBuddha:Harlee:meh...: edmo: rosekolodny: Malenfant: Psychopusher:
common sense is an oxymoron: Vitamin_R: DVD: BunkyBrewman: Sim Tree: amyldoanitrite:

Any chance one of you recognizes this summary of a story posted on Fark some time in the last few years:

An advanced civilization forms and then evolves around the warmth a deep sea vent, and discusses the impossibility of that civilization communicating with another deep sea vent civilization or to adapt to the vent eventually becoming dormant. The civilization was destined to rise and fall, permanently isolated, due to the enormous freezing darkness between vents.

Clearly allegorical for life in the expanse of space. Beautifully written, completely immersive, haven't been able to find it again.


I remember reading it, but that's it. Can't remember a name or author. Sorry.
 
2021-03-06 1:38:42 AM  
Well, guess I have to post this:
The Last Question
 
2021-03-06 3:46:39 AM  
Who could pass up an unexpected short story thread?

Something Passed By by Robert McCammon.
 
2021-03-06 8:03:11 AM  
Good read.  Thanks sunny!
 
2021-03-06 8:03:34 AM  

aRegularJoe_aRegularJob: Good read.  Thanks sunny!


*subby.  DYAC
 
2021-03-06 8:52:41 AM  
An old space sci-fi story. Does it have a dangerous swarm of incoming meteors? There is some sci-fi law that requires dangerous incoming meteors.
 
2021-03-06 9:59:39 AM  

DrunkenBob: Who could pass up an unexpected short story thread?

Something Passed By by Robert McCammon.


This story has always bothered me.
 
2021-03-06 10:13:49 AM  
Bad Hair Day


Once upon a time, in a land that would later become the Kingdom of the Pharaohs (that as you know loved cats) there lived an impetuous and self-centered king. This monarch, being cunning in the ways of power, would from time to time disguise himself as an itinerant merchant, and travel incognito within his realm. His bodyguards, weapons hidden, were disguised as personal servants. In this way, the king could gauge the will, wealth, and wisdom of the People, the better to intimidate, tax, and bamboozle them, and thus maintain his power.

One day, the king was so-traveling when he came to a small farming village at the crossing of two walking paths. There were, at this crossroads, several small huts. It was a beautiful spring day, a farm work holiday as it happened, and fluffy, sun-drenched clouds allowed for a comfortable temperature. Several villagers were out and about, taking advantage of the fine weather.

One hut had several rough chairs in front of it. One of these was occupied by a man, a fellow traveler from the look of him. A barber, who lived in the hut, was cutting the man's hair and beard. The King, whose favorite concubine had been complaining of his scratchy beard and too-long hair, had a sudden whim to have this barber attend to his hair. A haircut and beard trim would be just the thing for him on such a beautiful spring day!

So the King sat down to wait. And as he waited, he grew impatient. For the stranger getting the haircut and beard trim was persnickety. He kept holding up a small silver mirror, asking the barber to shave a little more here, in just "this" way, and cut a little more there, in just "that" manner.

The barber, eventually, began rolling his eyes and sighing in exasperation, but the stranger kept being unsatisfied. The King was now beginning to get angry, but mindful of his disguise, he attempted to engage the stranger in conversation as to exactly when and where the stranger was going to be satisfied with a haircut that was taking far too long. And the stranger responded to this sarcasm in a barbaric, guttural tone, and told the King to "stuff it up his ass."

And so it was that the King became enraged and ordered his bodyguard to cut the stranger down where he sat, which they did. And as the stranger lay dying, he pronounced a death curse upon the King, and upon the unfair universe. The king could never die. Further, that his facial hair would never stop growing, and that it could never be cut.

#

And so it happened. The barber was unable to cut a single hair of the King's head. Neither beard nor head hair gave way to shear or razor, or even the knives and swords of the bodyguard. The King, shaken and awed, returned to his capital and his throne.

Eventually, of course, he was overthrown. He couldn't be physically killed, of course, but he could be ridiculed and marginalized by his former subjects, and over time ignored. The ex-king hit rock bottom and took to heavy drinking and various hard drugs. This state of affairs persisted for thousands of years, and the ex-King eventually became known to one and all (those who cared) as one of the disreputable bums who eked out an existence in the shanty town down by the railroad tracks and pork rendering factory.

#

More time passed. And as cat people everywhere have always known would eventually happen, the Universe ended in a hairball. The king's hair eventually formed a black hole and, after drawing in all other matter in the unfair Universe, drew itself into itself and winked out of existence.

Because, as you know, "Hair Today, Gone Tomorrow."

###



You're welcome.
 
2021-03-06 10:15:20 AM  

amyldoanitrite: The Darkest Timeline: FrancoFile: PartTimeBuddha:Harlee:meh...: edmo: rosekolodny: Malenfant: Psychopusher:
common sense is an oxymoron: Vitamin_R: DVD: BunkyBrewman: Sim Tree: amyldoanitrite:

Any chance one of you recognizes this summary of a story posted on Fark some time in the last few years:

An advanced civilization forms and then evolves around the warmth a deep sea vent, and discusses the impossibility of that civilization communicating with another deep sea vent civilization or to adapt to the vent eventually becoming dormant. The civilization was destined to rise and fall, permanently isolated, due to the enormous freezing darkness between vents.

Clearly allegorical for life in the expanse of space. Beautifully written, completely immersive, haven't been able to find it again.

I remember reading it, but that's it. Can't remember a name or author. Sorry.


Ditto
 
2021-03-06 12:25:14 PM  

DrunkenBob: Who could pass up an unexpected short story thread?

Something Passed By by Robert McCammon.


Blue World has a lot of great stories... including Blue World!
 
2021-03-06 5:50:17 PM  

Harlee: Bad Hair Day


That was not very fun.
 
2021-03-06 10:35:07 PM  

PartTimeBuddha: Harlee: Bad Hair Day

That was not very fun.


Hairballs never are.

Seriously, what are your thoughts on that as a story? It came to me one day when I was HAF, literally out of farking nowhere. Boom! There it was in my head, straight from the Muse. No discernible cause or trigger.

I wrote it out nonstop, I think, in about 8 or 10 minutes. Took maybe another hour to fix the spellings and paragraphing. I've had it kicking around in my hard drive for a couple of years, and found it yesterday when I was looking over all the recovered files on the new laptop.
 
2021-03-07 1:03:29 AM  

DrunkenBob: Who could pass up an unexpected short story thread?

Something Passed By by Robert McCammon.


I had never read that story that story before, I like how he crammed all those writers' names in there. It takes me back to when I used to read stories by just about all of them. It's the Ready Player One of horror stories but in a good way.
 
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