Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Slate)   "My daughter reads better than her teacher thinks, but nothing is changing her teacher's mind about putting her in a different reading group. I know she belongs in a better one. How can I ensure this happens?"   (slate.com) divider line
    More: Facepalm, High school, Kindergarten, assortment of teachers, Education, Primary school, autistic kids, Teacher, students' ability  
•       •       •

255 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 05 Mar 2021 at 8:49 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



25 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-03-05 6:47:55 AM  
Give your daughter books to read that you believe are appropriate or that are suggested from resource sites on the internet. Limit device time until reading is complete. Talk to your daughter about the books you provided.

Public school -or private for that matter- is insufficient for the needs of many children. If your kid isn't a 100 iq normie or thereabout, either be wealthy enough for a tutor, expect to do heavy educational lifting, or simply lower your expectations for your child's academic success.

Don't bother bothering the teacher.

It isn't this bad in other countries. But hey, your taxes are low.
 
2021-03-05 6:58:25 AM  
You could try being a parent rather than writing fake letters to Slate for a living.
 
2021-03-05 7:03:33 AM  
It's funny what we stress about in the moment at hand.  When we look back at those moments we realize it really didn't matter.
 
2021-03-05 7:17:15 AM  
Dear Karen, you almost certainly do not know better than a trained educator who does this for a living. However, if you would like to frustrate your daughter and impede her development by insisting on advancement please be assured that the school administration will do that just to humor you and avoid conflict. Your move, biatch.
 
2021-03-05 8:24:59 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


Has some ideas on the matter.
 
2021-03-05 8:28:55 AM  
Jfc she's in kindergarten. None of this will ever matter in the long run
 
2021-03-05 8:38:33 AM  
My genius baby came home from second grade one day in a rage. They had a giant color coded system, we boring books on one end, and interesting books on the other end, and the teacher put her in the boring color group.

Admittedly, the kid was initially shy and didn't speak up often in class, but the teacher never tested her reading level, she just kind of guessed, based on her intuition.  The kid grabbed a book at the interesting end of the spectrum, knew all the words, knew what they meant, was able to spell them, and was able to give a synopsis of the story that included the characters, the plot, the setting.

It should be easy enough to re-test the reading level with the parent present.  The online thing... obviously a bit more of a challenge.  It seems lazy as hell to stick the kid into a given group and not let them move for a full year.
 
2021-03-05 8:57:07 AM  
Talk to the teacher and tell her your kid needs more challenging material.  Give your kid interesting stuff to read and help her with it.  This is not rocket surgery.
 
2021-03-05 9:00:49 AM  
Let the teacher know that the child's great at reading but you are much better at oral.
 
2021-03-05 9:15:24 AM  

Diogenes: [Fark user image image 760x428]

Has some ideas on the matter.


Aunt Becky look like she about to kill a motherfarker.
 
2021-03-05 9:18:24 AM  
Sounds like it's time to homeschool!
 
2021-03-05 9:23:58 AM  

yohohogreengiant: Give your daughter books to read that you believe are appropriate or that are suggested from resource sites on the internet. Limit device time until reading is complete. Talk to your daughter about the books you provided.


Great advice - other things you can do are to read with your child (e.g., I'll read this page, you read the next). Do stupid voices for the characters. If you've already read that book a few times, go off script (and be prepared to get yelled at - "THAT'S NOT HOW IT GOES!").  Have fun with it - if you show enthusiasm for reading, your kid probably will also.

Public school -or private for that matter- is insufficient for the needs of many children. If your kid isn't a 100 iq normie or thereabout, either be wealthy enough for a tutor, expect to do heavy educational lifting, or simply lower your expectations for your child's academic success.

Sadly, very true.

Don't bother bothering the teacher.

Disagree. Bring it up politely, treat the teacher as a professional. Moving a kid from one reading group to another is minimal effort for the teacher and they are likely to respond as long as you're not nagging or demeaning.
 
2021-03-05 9:30:55 AM  

Sorelian's Ghost: You could try being a parent rather than writing fake letters to Slate for a living.


OTOH school is specifically to teach literacy.

I mean, yeah, be a good parent. Which

But it isn't especially unreasonable to expect school to teach reading to children. It just isn't happening is all.
 
2021-03-05 9:33:15 AM  

eKonk: yohohogreengiant: Give your daughter books to read that you believe are appropriate or that are suggested from resource sites on the internet. Limit device time until reading is complete. Talk to your daughter about the books you provided.

Great advice - other things you can do are to read with your child (e.g., I'll read this page, you read the next). Do stupid voices for the characters. If you've already read that book a few times, go off script (and be prepared to get yelled at - "THAT'S NOT HOW IT GOES!").  Have fun with it - if you show enthusiasm for reading, your kid probably will also.

Public school -or private for that matter- is insufficient for the needs of many children. If your kid isn't a 100 iq normie or thereabout, either be wealthy enough for a tutor, expect to do heavy educational lifting, or simply lower your expectations for your child's academic success.

Sadly, very true.

Don't bother bothering the teacher.

Disagree. Bring it up politely, treat the teacher as a professional. Moving a kid from one reading group to another is minimal effort for the teacher and they are likely to respond as long as you're not nagging or demeaning.


I guess it depends on your district. Worth doing once per teacher and seeing if it got results worth it.

Teachers are professionals, as such, you will generally get what you (your district) is willing to pay for.
 
2021-03-05 9:45:19 AM  

yohohogreengiant: eKonk: yohohogreengiant: Give your daughter books to read that you believe are appropriate or that are suggested from resource sites on the internet. Limit device time until reading is complete. Talk to your daughter about the books you provided.

Great advice - other things you can do are to read with your child (e.g., I'll read this page, you read the next). Do stupid voices for the characters. If you've already read that book a few times, go off script (and be prepared to get yelled at - "THAT'S NOT HOW IT GOES!").  Have fun with it - if you show enthusiasm for reading, your kid probably will also.

Public school -or private for that matter- is insufficient for the needs of many children. If your kid isn't a 100 iq normie or thereabout, either be wealthy enough for a tutor, expect to do heavy educational lifting, or simply lower your expectations for your child's academic success.

Sadly, very true.

Don't bother bothering the teacher.

Disagree. Bring it up politely, treat the teacher as a professional. Moving a kid from one reading group to another is minimal effort for the teacher and they are likely to respond as long as you're not nagging or demeaning.

I guess it depends on your district. Worth doing once per teacher and seeing if it got results worth it.

Teachers are professionals, as such, you will generally get what you (your district) is willing to pay for.


Definitely true, though even in lower-paid districts you'll find some dedicated teachers who will work with you (assuming they have time and agree with your assessment of your kid's abilities).   Of course, if you've talked to the teacher and they're not willing to put in the effort, there's little else you can do on that end.  Which is why I like your first suggestion of taking it on yourself at home - no one's going to have the same level of influence on your (young) kid as yourself.
 
2021-03-05 10:42:09 AM  
Equip your daughter with an e-reader and a collection of Chuck Tingle books so she can show her teacher what a great reader she is. She'll be in the advanced group for super genius kiddies in no time!
 
2021-03-05 10:51:47 AM  
Change her name to Destiny, it should work as a stripper's name.
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-03-05 11:18:32 AM  
Letter writer sounds like a shy person - writing to Slate to get internet approval before even talking to the daughter's teacher.
 
2021-03-05 11:32:38 AM  
NCSB/

I went to grade school in the 70s when the prevailing educational idea was to let kids come at education at their own pace. As a first grader, I was given the option of reading or playing. I picked playing and was just assigned to the slow readers group. In fourth grade, I got extra help along with those recently mainstreamed.  In sixth grade, I finish the self-directed science curriculum four months ahead of my peers.

Now every year I was tested to see how I was improving. In eighth grade when I was officially reading at a fourth grade level I picked the Hobitt and then the Lord of the Rings books for my book reports. A paraprofessional went back and looked at my test scores and found I actually was reading at a twelfth grade level. They tested me each year but admitted to my parents they never reviewed the results. So I spent seven years doing phonic and never learning grammar or writing skills.

It is okay, I became an engineer and my boss is happy if I spell my name correctly on my time card.
 
2021-03-05 11:49:39 AM  
When my daughter was in second grade, I volunteered to read with the kids in her class. The teacher warned me that some kids will insist they can read far beyond their actual level. And yeah, those kids could read passages to me that were several years beyond their peers. There was a catch, though. They'd read everything back to me with perfect articulation and enunciation, but when I asked them to explain what they just read to me in their own words, they had absolutely no clue what any of it meant. As soon as I dialed it back to something within a reasonable range for a second grader, their comprehension was fine. I'm wondering if there's a bit of that going on here.
 
2021-03-05 12:32:13 PM  
I was an advanced reader (college level by third grade) and a speed reader, and honestly, it mostly just annoyed the hell out of teachers.

Teacher: Ringshadow, can you read the next paragraph to the class?
Me, half the book ahead: What?
 
2021-03-05 2:16:46 PM  
Here's a thought. BUY HER SOME FARKING BOOKS.
 
2021-03-05 2:54:49 PM  
Bang her father?
 
2021-03-05 4:08:12 PM  
We told our kids teacher put her in whatever group you feel she is qualified for if she is in the slow learners group so be it. Forcing her into a high level group means she might not understand whats going on leading to frustrations or her feeling like she is too dumb.

I dont have second graders reading to me everyday like the teacher does how the fark am I supposed to know if my child is ahead or behind them?
 
2021-03-05 8:52:20 PM  
My wife had a similar experience growing up: the classroom was divided into the elite Bluebird reading group, the  average-performing Redbird group, and the Brownbird group. No shiat.

They tested her but didn't know she needed glasses, and they put her in the Brownbird group.  Brownbirds got lesser attention because they were considered lost causes or something. Seemed counter-intuitive, but everyone wanted to hang with the cool Bluebirds.

Flash forward three years with this tracking bullshiat, and  never re-tested, they finally discover, oh shiat, she's several levels ahead of the so-called Blue Birds, she just needed some farking eyeglasses.

That would have killed me.  I'd read Treasure island, unabridged, on my own, before first grade. For several years, I was so far ahead of my peers, it led to a lot of bullying me.
 
Displayed 25 of 25 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.