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(The New York Times)   "How do I stop my 4 year-old from destroying everything in my home?"   (nytimes.com) divider line
    More: Awkward, son's timepiece, else am, Alarms, Clocks, quick shower, greater extent, Alarm clock, Striking clock  
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192 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 04 Mar 2021 at 9:35 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



17 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-03-04 7:44:11 AM  
INS may be selling off some child cages for cheap.

Maybe.
 
2021-03-04 7:49:02 AM  
Wait a few years, it could get better, it could get worse.
 
2021-03-04 7:54:40 AM  
Give it 10 years, they'll be destroying your car
 
2021-03-04 8:03:08 AM  
Misleading headline is misleading.
 
2021-03-04 9:12:48 AM  
Qualude Quisps for breakfast
 
2021-03-04 9:37:53 AM  
Move everything outside, then it won't be IN your home.
 
2021-03-04 9:47:29 AM  
My wife and I many times times over the past few years at various art festivals: That looks nice, but between the cats and the kids it wouldn't survive 30 seconds in our house.
 
2021-03-04 9:47:39 AM  
Actually, the article is how mom is psyched that her child is a budding engineer.
 
2021-03-04 9:48:06 AM  
If it's simply an examination of mechanical properties, set boundaries and make rules, find new "junk" for him to disassemble. If you get a pet and he decides to disassemble that, too, the kid needs some serious psychological help.

Curiosity, tamed by empathy, is good, if a bit destructive in this case. He needs to be taught to respect property, though.
 
2021-03-04 9:53:59 AM  
I was a disassembler as a child. As an adult, I feel guilty for it because I ruined a LOT of things that were precious to other people in my family. My brother's telescope, a table my great grandfather built (I had no idea before I started carving into it). I took apart my own things too, but they were things I no longer used or no longer cared about.

I didn't learn anything from these excursions except that it was very easy and took no skill to take something apart, but very difficult to impossible to put it back together and that I was hurting the people I loved.

I would have benefitted more from toys and kits that taught me how to built things. Channel my energy into something productive than something destructive.

But I was a child of the 70s. We didn't have raspberry pi's to play with. We had a lightbrite, and I think I took that apart when I got bored with it. The only thing I didn't take apart was the etch a sketch. I knew it has a powder inside and I didn't want any part of that. That was such a lame toy.
 
2021-03-04 10:04:50 AM  
That's a charming story and a good parent.

That kid is awesome.  Good for him.  Get him a chemistry set, start teaching him math ASAP.
 
2021-03-04 11:18:33 AM  

Ambivalence: I was a disassembler as a child. As an adult, I feel guilty for it because I ruined a LOT of things that were precious to other people in my family. My brother's telescope, a table my great grandfather built (I had no idea before I started carving into it). I took apart my own things too, but they were things I no longer used or no longer cared about.

I didn't learn anything from these excursions except that it was very easy and took no skill to take something apart, but very difficult to impossible to put it back together and that I was hurting the people I loved.

I would have benefitted more from toys and kits that taught me how to built things. Channel my energy into something productive than something destructive.

But I was a child of the 70s. We didn't have raspberry pi's to play with. We had a lightbrite, and I think I took that apart when I got bored with it. The only thing I didn't take apart was the etch a sketch. I knew it has a powder inside and I didn't want any part of that. That was such a lame toy.


Totally lame.
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-03-04 12:40:16 PM  

WWTandPD: Ambivalence: I was a disassembler as a child. As an adult, I feel guilty for it because I ruined a LOT of things that were precious to other people in my family. My brother's telescope, a table my great grandfather built (I had no idea before I started carving into it). I took apart my own things too, but they were things I no longer used or no longer cared about.

I didn't learn anything from these excursions except that it was very easy and took no skill to take something apart, but very difficult to impossible to put it back together and that I was hurting the people I loved.

I would have benefitted more from toys and kits that taught me how to built things. Channel my energy into something productive than something destructive.

But I was a child of the 70s. We didn't have raspberry pi's to play with. We had a lightbrite, and I think I took that apart when I got bored with it. The only thing I didn't take apart was the etch a sketch. I knew it has a powder inside and I didn't want any part of that. That was such a lame toy.

Totally lame.[Fark user image image 750x949]


You absolutely could not do something like that with an old-school Etch-a-sketch.
 
2021-03-04 3:15:49 PM  

lindalouwho: WWTandPD: Ambivalence: I was a disassembler as a child. As an adult, I feel guilty for it because I ruined a LOT of things that were precious to other people in my family. My brother's telescope, a table my great grandfather built (I had no idea before I started carving into it). I took apart my own things too, but they were things I no longer used or no longer cared about.

I didn't learn anything from these excursions except that it was very easy and took no skill to take something apart, but very difficult to impossible to put it back together and that I was hurting the people I loved.

I would have benefitted more from toys and kits that taught me how to built things. Channel my energy into something productive than something destructive.

But I was a child of the 70s. We didn't have raspberry pi's to play with. We had a lightbrite, and I think I took that apart when I got bored with it. The only thing I didn't take apart was the etch a sketch. I knew it has a powder inside and I didn't want any part of that. That was such a lame toy.

Totally lame.[Fark user image image 750x949]

You absolutely could not do something like that with an old-school Etch-a-sketch.


I couldn't, but if you hooked the dials up to a computer it could happen.
 
2021-03-04 3:36:06 PM  

lindalouwho: You absolutely could not do something like that with an old-school Etch-a-sketch.


I'm sure there were etch a sketch savants floating around who could do it, but a kid? No way. I also couldn't solve a Rubix cube (took that apart too, LOL!).
 
2021-03-04 3:51:51 PM  
You should have stopped buying new stuff the moment you found out you were expecting the kid.

You can buy nice stuff again in 15 years
 
2021-03-04 8:52:07 PM  
Phelan 1,2,3 magic. Look it up.
 
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