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(NYPost)   On second thought, perhaps having 'Pretend Like You're A Slave' day at school wasn't such a good idea after all   (nypost.com) divider line
    More: Facepalm, High school, middle school, Teacher, Education, Atlantic Ocean, white students, Purvis Middle School, Atlantic slave trade  
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1738 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Mar 2021 at 8:30 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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433 [TotalFark]
2021-03-04 3:39:42 AM  
1)  Pretend that slaves were allowed to read and write.
 
2021-03-04 4:48:39 AM  

433: 1)  Pretend that slaves were allowed to read and write.


Came here to post this. The only acceptable way to get an A on that assignment is if you didn't turn in a letter at all, because you could be killed for knowing how to read and write.
 
2021-03-04 8:10:13 AM  
If only they had BDSM class when I was a kid.
 
2021-03-04 8:11:11 AM  
How. In. The. F*ck. Are. These. Lessons. Still. Happening?
 
2021-03-04 8:31:40 AM  
School is optional in Mississippi
 
2021-03-04 8:32:45 AM  

Visual Howlaround Title Sequence: How. In. The. F*ck. Are. These. Lessons. Still. Happening?


First word from TFA headline:

Mississippi
 
2021-03-04 8:32:45 AM  
Hello Muddah, Hello Faddah Lyrics
Youtube LI3tSF7E5VU


//window seat, please
 
2021-03-04 8:33:19 AM  
My public school taught me how to deal loose joints during free periods.
 
2021-03-04 8:35:47 AM  
The safeword was "unemployment."
 
2021-03-04 8:38:17 AM  

Target Builder: Visual Howlaround Title Sequence: How. In. The. F*ck. Are. These. Lessons. Still. Happening?

First word from TFA headline:

Mississippi


Ah.
 
2021-03-04 8:38:17 AM  

MattytheMouse: 433: 1)  Pretend that slaves were allowed to read and write.

Came here to post this. The only acceptable way to get an A on that assignment is if you didn't turn in a letter at all, because you could be killed for knowing how to read and write.


It was legal (but extremely rare) to educate slaves up through the early 1830s.  But state governments couldn't stop that fast enough after the Turner Rebellion.
 
2021-03-04 8:38:28 AM  
They really don't get it down there do they.  They just can't even wrap their heads around why this shiat is wrong.
 
2021-03-04 8:39:36 AM  
Next week, geography: Pretend you are a Native American whose family was uprooted and sent on a forced march to a reservation so that white settlers could take over their land. Write postcards to your friends at the reservation about interesting landmarks you see along the way.
 
2021-03-04 8:40:18 AM  
pbs.twimg.comView Full Size
 
2021-03-04 8:41:02 AM  
Let me tell you about the Mississippi education system...
 
2021-03-04 8:42:22 AM  

Visual Howlaround Title Sequence: How. In. The. F*ck. Are. These. Lessons. Still. Happening?


I understand it, because when I was in 5th grade I had to write an essay from the viewpoint of any character in "One day in the life of Ivan Denisovich" its an exercise in displaying how well you comprehended the material amongst other things.

Slavery is a touchy one though.

Maybe they've done away with these type of assignments, fifth grade was some time ago...
 
2021-03-04 8:42:52 AM  
Teacher from my town used to make kids pretend to be slaves too.

Fark: He's the farkin mayor.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.usat​o​day.com/amp/4747309002

My town has like 500 people, I've been thinking we could be one of those places where a dog is the mayor, specifically my dog. I think we're gonna do it.
 
2021-03-04 8:48:08 AM  
in my junior high school in the 1970s they had, as part of the "Spirit Week" celebration that included things like Colors Day, and Toga Day, there was "Slave Day." Having nothing to do teaching American History.

Its started with the before school "Slave Auction" for charity. Where mainly the stuck up girls would pool their money in groups, (other kids didn't have the money) and "buy" the hunky jock guys (less popular kids didn't sell) for a day of ritual humiliation. They lead him around on a leash, make him wear a diaper or a dress and make-up, carry an embarrassing sign. etc.

There were rules that you couldn't have your slave do any of your school work or anything, much less anything "naughty"  So it was just the public humiliation.  For some reason none of the black people ever participated.

That was public school in the 1970s.
 
2021-03-04 8:49:46 AM  
Teachers do role-playing assignments all the time.  Putting yourself in the mindset of a victimized person can be a great way to develop empathy and get invested in history.  I can get why some are opposed to it but I also understand why these assignments are given with good intentions.
 
2021-03-04 8:50:17 AM  
What did they have them do, work in an Amazon warehouse and die of a completely treatable condition?
 
2021-03-04 8:50:20 AM  
I made some of the crappiest knives in wood and metal shop.  Wooden knives with metal grips.  Wasn't my fault.  Wood shop was before metal working.

Wooden knives on the water, very free and easy.
 
2021-03-04 8:51:17 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-03-04 8:52:52 AM  
I don't know. Making kids write about the horrors of slavery in the first person seem like a good way to cultivate empathy.

Kids that age are pretty self centered creatures. Having them imagine all those bad thighs happening to them would help drive the lesson home more than being told about it happening to another group of people hundreds of years ago.
 
2021-03-04 8:53:43 AM  

brainlordmesomorph: in my junior high school in the 1970s they had, as part of the "Spirit Week" celebration that included things like Colors Day, and Toga Day, there was "Slave Day." Having nothing to do teaching American History.

Its started with the before school "Slave Auction" for charity. Where mainly the stuck up girls would pool their money in groups, (other kids didn't have the money) and "buy" the hunky jock guys (less popular kids didn't sell) for a day of ritual humiliation. They lead him around on a leash, make him wear a diaper or a dress and make-up, carry an embarrassing sign. etc.

There were rules that you couldn't have your slave do any of your school work or anything, much less anything "naughty"  So it was just the public humiliation.  For some reason none of the black people ever participated.

That was public school in the 1970s.


My small private (but not "elite") religious school, north of the Mason-Dixon line, had "Sophomore Slave Day" at least through the mid-1980s.  Worked largely as you described.  Around the time I was there in the late 1980s, I think they changed the word from "Slave" to "Helper" or something.
 
2021-03-04 8:56:45 AM  
According to some Oxford professor, there  were more pasty white Britons in slavery in around 1620 in North Africa than there were Britons partying in the American Colonies.  There was one story of a couple from the wilds of Cornwall and Ireland being captured by pirates, sold as slaves in Morocco.

I'm sure that reenactment has never happened at an ordinary school in America.
 
2021-03-04 8:57:49 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


At least it's a way to get the kids to wear masks at school.
 
2021-03-04 8:58:36 AM  

Dr. Opossum: Teachers do role-playing assignments all the time.  Putting yourself in the mindset of a victimized person can be a great way to develop empathy and get invested in history.  I can get why some are opposed to it but I also understand why these assignments are given with good intentions.


Fark user imageView Full Size

https://www.zinnedproject.org/news/ho​w​-to-teach-role-plays/

A professional with a degree in education should know better than to create a role playing experience that trivializes and falsifies history (writing to family back home in Africa LOL)

But Mississippi
 
2021-03-04 8:59:20 AM  
In school, we were told to watch TV without the sound on to see what it was like to be deaf.

I told the teacher it was an idiotic assignment, because I wouldn't watch TV if I was deaf unless it had closed captions.
 
2021-03-04 9:10:33 AM  

gar1013: In school, we were told to watch TV without the sound on to see what it was like to be deaf.

I told the teacher it was an idiotic assignment, because I wouldn't watch TV if I was deaf unless it had closed captions.


We had to that and also write a letter home as a Roman slave.
Another was as an indentured 7yo starting your second week underground in a coal mine paid in tokens that could only be spent at the company store.
The practice only stoped 150 years ago, you had to be 14 after that.
 
2021-03-04 9:11:10 AM  

Dr. Opossum: Teachers do role-playing assignments all the time.  Putting yourself in the mindset of a victimized person can be a great way to develop empathy and get invested in history.  I can get why some are opposed to it but I also understand why these assignments are given with good intentions.


In the not too distant future "and today Dr. Opossum was cancelled"...
 
2021-03-04 9:11:13 AM  

Dr. Opossum: Teachers do role-playing assignments all the time.  Putting yourself in the mindset of a victimized person can be a great way to develop empathy and get invested in history.  I can get why some are opposed to it but I also understand why these assignments are given with good intentions.


This.
Other than the literacy part mentioned above, I don't see what's wrong with this exercise.

/Other than the fact that the students might actually develop nightmares/PTSD just by imagining how bad things were.
//this is a tough exercise
///to allow for the literacy part, they could have done a "fire pit talk" where they talk about how the were kidnapped and enslaved and beaten and saw friends die/killed along the way
 
2021-03-04 9:11:21 AM  

brainlordmesomorph: in my junior high school in the 1970s they had, as part of the "Spirit Week" celebration that included things like Colors Day, and Toga Day, there was "Slave Day." Having nothing to do teaching American History.

Its started with the before school "Slave Auction" for charity. Where mainly the stuck up girls would pool their money in groups, (other kids didn't have the money) and "buy" the hunky jock guys (less popular kids didn't sell) for a day of ritual humiliation. They lead him around on a leash, make him wear a diaper or a dress and make-up, carry an embarrassing sign. etc.

There were rules that you couldn't have your slave do any of your school work or anything, much less anything "naughty"  So it was just the public humiliation.  For some reason none of the black people ever participated.

That was public school in the 1970s.


Yep. I was auctioned off as part of a shave auction in high school for charity.

I was absolutely gobsmacked that the homecoming queen bought me.
 
2021-03-04 9:12:20 AM  

BitwiseShift: According to some Oxford professor, there  were more pasty white Britons in slavery in around 1620 in North Africa than there were Britons partying in the American Colonies.  There was one story of a couple from the wilds of Cornwall and Ireland being captured by pirates, sold as slaves in Morocco.

I'm sure that reenactment has never happened at an ordinary school in America.


Yeah no that's bull crap.
 
2021-03-04 9:15:47 AM  
I remember wanting to be a college professor right out of high school and landing a teaching assistant position to the Dean of Humanities at my college.

The students could ask anything they wanted in a written Q&A assignment.

This was week two.

One of the students who resembled Screech from Saved By the Bell asked "Did the Romans ever rape their female slaves?"

I suppose I shouldn't have been surprised but I stared at that paper for quite some time mulling over the thought process at work there.
 
2021-03-04 9:16:01 AM  

Visual Howlaround Title Sequence: How. In. The. F*ck. Are. These. Lessons. Still. Happening?


Be less white.
 
2021-03-04 9:28:12 AM  

Visual Howlaround Title Sequence: How. In. The. F*ck. Are. These. Lessons. Still. Happening?


This. Waaaay in the distant past when I was in Jr. high/high school I was a Latin nerd. This was well before the concept of "trigger warnings" were a thing, but my Latin teacher explained that slavery was ubiquitous in the classical world and there is a lot of language and texts involving slaves.

Most importantly he explained that all throughout history up to the modern day there has been a push to romanticize classical slavery, with examples of how well slaves were treated and even honored (especially educated Greek slaves), and we should not be fooled into thinking that enslaved people preferred being slaves (a la "a Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum") or anything like that.

Also he made sure we understood that rapere was a very broad term...
 
2021-03-04 9:34:29 AM  

Visual Howlaround Title Sequence: BitwiseShift: According to some Oxford professor, there  were more pasty white Britons in slavery in around 1620 in North Africa than there were Britons partying in the American Colonies.  There was one story of a couple from the wilds of Cornwall and Ireland being captured by pirates, sold as slaves in Morocco.

I'm sure that reenactment has never happened at an ordinary school in America.

Yeah no that's bull crap.


https://news.osu.edu/when-europeans-w​e​re-slaves--research-suggests-white-sla​very-was-much-more-common-than-previou​sly-believed/

https://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryUK/​HistoryofEngland/Barbary-Pirates-Engli​sh-Slaves/
 
2021-03-04 9:34:54 AM  
In that the lesson asked the students to put themselves in the mindset of a slave and write about their lives in order to make them think about what it was like, I don't see the actual problem with this. I'm guessing that if it had been phrased differently ("Write a letter from the viewpoint of a slave") there'd be a lot less couch swooning.
 
2021-03-04 9:36:04 AM  
It's always farking Mississippi, isn't it? What a goddamn worthless pile of crap state. Someone cue Nina Simone.
 
2021-03-04 9:36:15 AM  

Resident Muslim: Dr. Opossum: Teachers do role-playing assignments all the time.  Putting yourself in the mindset of a victimized person can be a great way to develop empathy and get invested in history.  I can get why some are opposed to it but I also understand why these assignments are given with good intentions.

This.
Other than the literacy part mentioned above, I don't see what's wrong with this exercise.

/Other than the fact that the students might actually develop nightmares/PTSD just by imagining how bad things were.
//this is a tough exercise
///to allow for the literacy part, they could have done a "fire pit talk" where they talk about how the were kidnapped and enslaved and beaten and saw friends die/killed along the way


I'm sorry - and full disclosure I was thinking the same before I clicked the link. But...

pbs.twimg.comView Full Size


"You might also want to tell about the family you live with / work for...."

That's a huge problem.  My wife is from southern Georgia. I'm from Boston.  To say that we were taught about the experience of slaves in a different manner is a major understatement.  She has seen the light for a long time now, but when we were first dating she really thought that slaves were treated well, like they were a member of the family, because that thinking was ingrained in her due to lessons exactly like this.

The term "work for" is extremely problematic, as it infers what slaves did as a job and they got paid.

I really do think the teacher had good intentions with this - but sugar coating it is not going to help anyone and just keeps a long cycle of disinformation alive.
 
2021-03-04 9:36:57 AM  

proteus_b: Dr. Opossum: Teachers do role-playing assignments all the time.  Putting yourself in the mindset of a victimized person can be a great way to develop empathy and get invested in history.  I can get why some are opposed to it but I also understand why these assignments are given with good intentions.

In the not too distant future "and today Dr. Opossum was cancelled"...


Dr. Opossum only has a PhD and is not a real doctor! They are trying to deceive us!
 
2021-03-04 9:45:49 AM  

433: 1)  Pretend that slaves were allowed to read and write.


Between 5 and 10% of slaves were literate. https://www.jstor.org/stable/23546575​?​seq=1
 
2021-03-04 9:46:10 AM  

HailRobonia: proteus_b: Dr. Opossum: Teachers do role-playing assignments all the time.  Putting yourself in the mindset of a victimized person can be a great way to develop empathy and get invested in history.  I can get why some are opposed to it but I also understand why these assignments are given with good intentions.

In the not too distant future "and today Dr. Opossum was cancelled"...

Dr. Opossum only has a PhD and is not a real doctor! They are trying to deceive us!


Handle checks out...
res.cloudinary.comView Full Size
 
2021-03-04 9:48:17 AM  
yes lets not have the younger generations actually learn what the horrors of slavery were like.  Sure you can tell them but having them actually sit down and write out what the experience was like is much more effective.

but oh noes racist!
 
2021-03-04 9:48:44 AM  

Visual Howlaround Title Sequence: Yep. I was auctioned off as part of a shave auction in high school for charity.


Sounds kinky.
 
2021-03-04 9:49:04 AM  
I guess this is a springtime activity? I swear I see this same headline around March/April every damn year
 
2021-03-04 9:56:11 AM  

Dr. Opossum: Teachers do role-playing assignments all the time.  Putting yourself in the mindset of a victimized person can be a great way to develop empathy and get invested in history.  I can get why some are opposed to it but I also understand why these assignments are given with good intentions.


That was my first take until I read the article. This wasn't "think about what it was really like"... it was a weird, fanciful "what do you do when you're not working?" and "tell us about the family you live with" like slavery is summer camp. What's the right answer to these?
 
2021-03-04 9:56:15 AM  

swankywanky: "You might also want to tell about the family you live with / work for...."

That's a huge problem.  My wife is from southern Georgia. I'm from Boston.  To say that we were taught about the experience of slaves in a different manner is a major understatement.  She has seen the light for a long time now, but when we were first dating she really thought that slaves were treated well, like they were a member of the family, because that thinking was ingrained in her due to lessons exactly like this.

The term "work for" is extremely problematic, as it infers what slaves did as a job and they got paid.

I really do think the teacher had good intentions with this - but sugar coating it is not going to help anyone and just keeps a long cycle of disinformation alive.


Using the term 'work for' effectively communicates the intent because honestly that is all that the African slaves were valued as by their owners - for the work they can accomplish. The term 'working for' explains the role. My aunt works for religious institution. She has regular hours but does not get paid.

The exercise is actually not a bad one. Liberals are going to be triggered by ANYTHING related to slavery outside of a stern lecture on how terrible it was. That stern lecture has its place, but assignments like this are good exercises to have students assemble the content that has provided them and thoughtfully make judgements in writing a short narrative.
 
2021-03-04 9:58:44 AM  

Dr. Opossum: Teachers do role-playing assignments all the time.  Putting yourself in the mindset of a victimized person can be a great way to develop empathy and get invested in history.  I can get why some are opposed to it but I also understand why these assignments are given with good intentions.


I get it, too. Roleplay is more engaging than a straight lecture, especially for younger kids. But there are a couple of areas of history that folks need to stay the fark away from role-playing, and one of 'em is American slavery. The problems are that:

* Requiring black students to re-enact generational trauma without parental permission or notification is pretty farked up.

* Using slave roleplay lessons to teach empathy to non-black students doesn't actually seem to work very well (naturally, I now can't find the long-form piece I read on this, but there is one, I swear). Instead of "Wow, slavery was bad, I should fully appreciate the Af-Am experience," they go to "Wow, slavery was bad, but I'm over it now. Why aren't black people over it, too?"

The current suggestion is that, rather than roleplay exercises, slavery is better woven into the rest of the history curriculum so it doesn't become a one-day experience for kids. Which was part of the point of the 1619 project, and presumably why Republicans oppose it.
 
2021-03-04 10:00:36 AM  

brainlordmesomorph: in my junior high school in the 1970s they had, as part of the "Spirit Week" celebration that included things like Colors Day, and Toga Day, there was "Slave Day." Having nothing to do teaching American History.

Its started with the before school "Slave Auction" for charity. Where mainly the stuck up girls would pool their money in groups, (other kids didn't have the money) and "buy" the hunky jock guys (less popular kids didn't sell) for a day of ritual humiliation. They lead him around on a leash, make him wear a diaper or a dress and make-up, carry an embarrassing sign. etc.

There were rules that you couldn't have your slave do any of your school work or anything, much less anything "naughty"  So it was just the public humiliation.  For some reason none of the black people ever participated.

That was public school in the 1970s.


My high school had a very similar program. Freshmen were the targets.
 
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