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(Phys Org2)   Scientists use extinct niobium-92 atom to more accurately date events in our early solar system. Wait, atoms can go extinct?   (phys.org) divider line
    More: Interesting, Solar System, Supernova, Interstellar medium, Sun, ETH researchers, Milky Way, uranium-lead dating technique, extinct niobium-92 atom  
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481 clicks; posted to STEM » on 04 Mar 2021 at 5:05 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



10 Comments     (+0 »)
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2021-03-03 9:44:27 PM  
An Atom without an Eve will go extinct. This is science.
 
2021-03-03 11:33:40 PM  
Wasted by the ancient aliens rollin' niobium while hauling pyramids around the galaxy to store their wheat. Now they can't get back here because 1. solar only works when you're close to the sun, b. there's no wind in space, and IV. you go and try to find a 670 light year extension cord, Einstein.
 
2021-03-04 12:10:43 AM  

felching pen: Wasted by the ancient aliens rollin' niobium while hauling pyramids around the galaxy to store their wheat. Now they can't get back here because 1. solar only works when you're close to the sun, b. there's no wind in space, and IV. you go and try to find a 670 light year extension cord, Einstein.


Try Intergalactic Depot, aisle 99A-ψ-🍎💎-(unpronounceable glyph), next to Illudium Q-36 Explosive Space Modulators
 
2021-03-04 5:21:45 AM  

Sin'sHero: An Atom without an eV will go extinct. This is science.


FTFY
 
2021-03-04 7:36:46 AM  
Some materials have a half-life. Uranium turns to lead. I have zero clue how solar systems form other than 1 or 2 science documentaries, but I assume this element only forms when large stars are formed, which I assume was calculated when the universe was younger and made more large stars.

Because I won't read TFA past the headline.

Maybe I should.
 
2021-03-04 8:56:32 AM  
I hate when popular science publications dumb down studies past the point of conveying any information.... Just looking at the abstract of the study itself is more informative than reading TFA.

https://www.pnas.org/content/118/8/e2​0​17750118
 
2021-03-04 9:30:25 AM  
Yes they can all decay if their half life is short enough and none is being produced in the Solar System. Indeed list of isotopes not being produced sorted by half life generates a list which the first part is all known on Earth and the second part is not found.
 
2021-03-04 11:47:03 AM  

turboke: Sin'sHero: An Atom without an eV will go extinct. This is science.

FTFY


c.tenor.comView Full Size

Well done!
 
2021-03-04 12:25:48 PM  

Arkanaut: I hate when popular science publications dumb down studies past the point of conveying any information.... Just looking at the abstract of the study itself is more informative than reading TFA.

https://www.pnas.org/content/118/8/e20​17750118


Yeah, the whole idea of calling it "extinct" screams "stupid reporter!"

This is just another way of radioisotope dating--since it's purely based on decay products it has a big calibration problem.  You can order things but you can't pin it to a calendar unless you have some reference point.  I haven't read the study but it sounds like they found some way to get a reference point.
 
2021-03-04 2:30:27 PM  

Loren: Yeah, the whole idea of calling it "extinct" screams "stupid reporter!"


Well if Nb92 is not produced by any current process in our solar system, a half-life of 37 million years means that after 4.5 billion years, the current level of Nb92 is something like 10^-36 of what we started out with, which is probably virtually undetectable. Looks like we're getting around that by comparing levels of the decay product against Nb93, which it seems is produced in a predictable ratio compared to Nb92.
 
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