Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Twitter)   Milliways set to open in 2027. Pan Galactic Gargle Blasters for everyone   (twitter.com) divider line
    More: Giggity, shot  
•       •       •

1321 clicks; posted to STEM » and Fandom » on 03 Mar 2021 at 7:18 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



42 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-03-03 7:43:09 AM  
Original Tweet:

 
2021-03-03 8:54:00 AM  
Why do we even care what a tiny fraction of the population thinks?

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/​o​bservations/do-people-really-think-ear​th-might-be-flat/

Indeed, firm belief in a flat Earth was rare, with less than a 2 percent acceptance rate in all age groups.

I mean, other than feeling superior to people that.........


Oh, I get it now.
 
2021-03-03 9:10:46 AM  
By 2027?  Not likely.
 
2021-03-03 9:11:41 AM  
I'm 100% convinced that a 400-guest space hotel will be put in orbit in a mere 6 years AND that it will be commercially viable. This doesn't sound like an investor-fleecing operation at all.
 
2021-03-03 9:16:51 AM  

Pelvic Splanchnic Ganglion: I'm 100% convinced that a 400-guest space hotel will be put in orbit in a mere 6 years AND that it will be commercially viable. This doesn't sound like an investor-fleecing operation at all.


I'm just excited to stay in a space hotel for what will surely cost me 6 or 7 figures to get there, lord knows how much per night... So I can watch movies in their tiny space theater. A theater, what a perfect thing to waste a huge amount of space for such a trivial event that I can do it my phone or laptop or tablet.

You're right, an idea that blatantly stupid couldn't possibly be meant to fleece investors... It's too obviously stupid.

\Would love to hear about their supply chain and staffing plans... After all, these must be sorted of they can open in 6 years, right?
 
2021-03-03 9:18:36 AM  
Why Milliways? I'm kind of hoping the end of the universe is a bit farther away than 2027
 
2021-03-03 9:19:49 AM  
Why does it need so many escape shuttles, is there a problem?
 
2021-03-03 9:35:00 AM  
Funny how they constantly show us how crowded it is on the ISS, yet somehow the rooms on this amazing space hotel will be larger than hotel rooms in London.

I guess private enterprise beats government bureaucracy after all, huh?

/This has been your daily dose of Bad Takes
 
2021-03-03 9:37:39 AM  

KarmicDisaster: Why does it need so many escape shuttles, is there a problem?


My thought too. That's 48 escape shuttles. That alone is billions of dollars worth. The amount of people on board wouldn't be that high, so maybe half a dozen slightly bigger escape shuttles would do.

And they can't be used for anything else because trying to dock one of those to a spinning space station would be utterly impossible.
You could have them dock in the centre, at zero gravity, and then slide down one of the arms to the escape position and 1g, but those drawings don't show that.
 
2021-03-03 9:41:46 AM  
I'll take "Things that won't be built" for $400B Alex.
 
2021-03-03 9:45:57 AM  
Seems familiar...
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-03-03 9:47:07 AM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: trying to dock one of those to a spinning space station would be utterly impossible.


images-wixmp-ed30a86b8c4ca887773594c2.wixmp.comView Full Size
 
2021-03-03 10:02:20 AM  
I hope it's designed to withstand an attack by Vermicious Knids.
 
2021-03-03 10:13:26 AM  
bars and restaurants limited on Earth because of COVID.  Sure, let's put them in space!
 
2021-03-03 10:20:00 AM  

markie_farkie: Carter Pewterschmidt: trying to dock one of those to a spinning space station would be utterly impossible.

[images-wixmp-ed30a86b8c4ca887773594c2​.wixmp.com image 850x372]


Docking in the middle, the zero gravity part, is easy. Well, as easy as anything in space can be. But the escape shuttles are shown docked on the outer rim. They're essentially hanging from a ceiling, at full gravity, while spinning around. Trying to dock in that position would require reversing up to the dock at full earth gravity while also spinning around.
Try this: Get a record player and glue a lego block at the outer edge or a LP record and set it playing at 33rpm. Then try to click another lego block onto it while it's revolving. That's still going to be a hundred times easier than docking on the outer rim of a spinning space station.

/And that image appears to be a Space 1999 Eagle docking onto the 2001 space station.
 
2021-03-03 10:20:13 AM  
The Pan-Galactic Gargle Blaster, made from human elements on Earth. Mostly Harmless.

Grab a beer glass and pack with ice (or don't, depending on how hard you want this to hit). 

One shot Blue Curacao
One shot citrus vodka
One dash of bitters
Fill the remainder of the glass with champagne. Lightly stir. 

It's stunningly delicious. And the equivalent of being hit in the back of the head with a blackjack.
 
2021-03-03 10:27:03 AM  
Will still pay waitstaff less than minimum wage
 
2021-03-03 10:31:27 AM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: KarmicDisaster: Why does it need so many escape shuttles, is there a problem?


My thought too. That's 48 escape shuttles.


If you've got 400 guests, *PLUS* staff to serve them and maintain the station, say an extra 80 people, that's 10 people per escape shuttle.

That seems eminently reasonable to me.

These things would also be fairly bare-bones.  When you're building something like that for emergency single use, it doesn't have to be built to the same standards as something you're going to use over and over again.

Also, as an emergency thing, it only needs to keep people alive for a short amount of time.  If you're going around the Earth every 90 minutes, you can almost certainly be able to find an adequate landing area within, say, 3 orbits time, so having enough air for 10 people for 5 hours should be perfectly adequate.

Consumables like water and food wouldn't be necessary.  Just some lithium hydroxide containers to remove CO2, and a small bottle of oxygen.  Simple reaction control system, maybe even a cold gas one.  Solid fuel retro rocket.

Have the onboard computer know where it is, and where the best abort sites are, and have it do all it needs to do automatically.  Each employee would be trained to activate the lifeboat.  You get everyone in, strapped in, and you smash the big red button.  Craft separates from the hotel, goes a short distance away, decides what it's best options are for abort (or presents them to the crew), and then either goes there, or goes where it's told.  At the appropriate time, it orients itself and fires the retro rocket.  Then it reorients itself and reenters, then flies to the abort airport selected.

You could even program them to be cooperative so that you don't have 48 "lifeboats" all attempting to land at the same airport at the same time.

You could probably build something like that, because it's a one-time use thing and doesn't need to be re-used, and doesn't need any real contingency planning (it *IS* the contingency, after all!) for a few tens of millions of bucks a piece at the most.
 
2021-03-03 10:36:45 AM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: Docking in the middle, the zero gravity part, is easy. Well, as easy as anything in space can be. But the escape shuttles are shown docked on the outer rim. They're essentially hanging from a ceiling, at full gravity, while spinning around. Trying to dock in that position would require reversing up to the dock at full earth gravity while also spinning around.


They're the *EMERGENCY* shuttles.  They don't *HAVE* to dock on a regular basis, they simply stay there until needed.

And you can dock them in place *BEFORE* you start the thing spinning.  If you have to replace them at some point, you secure everything in the station, stop it from spinning, dock the new lifeboats, then start it spinning again.  You wouldn't want to replace them when you have guests anyway, so you'd simply schedule a week where you do that sort of thing every few years.

And they're not hanging from a ceiling, they're hanging from a *FLOOR*.  You'd climb down into them.
 
2021-03-03 10:46:21 AM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: markie_farkie: Carter Pewterschmidt: trying to dock one of those to a spinning space station would be utterly impossible.

[images-wixmp-ed30a86b8c4ca887773594c2​.wixmp.com image 850x372]

Docking in the middle, the zero gravity part, is easy. Well, as easy as anything in space can be. But the escape shuttles are shown docked on the outer rim. They're essentially hanging from a ceiling, at full gravity, while spinning around. Trying to dock in that position would require reversing up to the dock at full earth gravity while also spinning around.
Try this: Get a record player and glue a lego block at the outer edge or a LP record and set it playing at 33rpm. Then try to click another lego block onto it while it's revolving. That's still going to be a hundred times easier than docking on the outer rim of a spinning space station.

/And that image appears to be a Space 1999 Eagle docking onto the 2001 space station.


I think I read somewhere that it was going to be moon gravity not Earth.  But your points still stand.
 
2021-03-03 10:47:43 AM  

MadHatter500: I'll take "Things that won't be built" for $400B Alex.


I for one find it entirely plausible that we'll get a playground in space for the rich far before anything actually useful to the other 99.9 percent of the human race like a space elevator.
 
2021-03-03 10:56:15 AM  

Copperbelly watersnake: MadHatter500: I'll take "Things that won't be built" for $400B Alex.

I for one find it entirely plausible that we'll get a playground in space for the rich far before anything actually useful to the other 99.9 percent of the human race like a space elevator.


Why would a space elevator be useful for the other 99.9% of the human race?

I doubt more than the top 10% at the very most could afford to avail themselves of it.
 
2021-03-03 11:07:02 AM  

dittybopper: Carter Pewterschmidt: KarmicDisaster: Why does it need so many escape shuttles, is there a problem?


My thought too. That's 48 escape shuttles.

If you've got 400 guests, *PLUS* staff to serve them and maintain the station, say an extra 80 people, that's 10 people per escape shuttle.

That seems eminently reasonable to me.

These things would also be fairly bare-bones.  When you're building something like that for emergency single use, it doesn't have to be built to the same standards as something you're going to use over and over again.

Also, as an emergency thing, it only needs to keep people alive for a short amount of time.  If you're going around the Earth every 90 minutes, you can almost certainly be able to find an adequate landing area within, say, 3 orbits time, so having enough air for 10 people for 5 hours should be perfectly adequate.

Consumables like water and food wouldn't be necessary.  Just some lithium hydroxide containers to remove CO2, and a small bottle of oxygen.  Simple reaction control system, maybe even a cold gas one.  Solid fuel retro rocket.

Have the onboard computer know where it is, and where the best abort sites are, and have it do all it needs to do automatically.  Each employee would be trained to activate the lifeboat.  You get everyone in, strapped in, and you smash the big red button.  Craft separates from the hotel, goes a short distance away, decides what it's best options are for abort (or presents them to the crew), and then either goes there, or goes where it's told.  At the appropriate time, it orients itself and fires the retro rocket.  Then it reorients itself and reenters, then flies to the abort airport selected.

You could even program them to be cooperative so that you don't have 48 "lifeboats" all attempting to land at the same airport at the same time.

You could probably build something like that, because it's a one-time use thing and doesn't need to be re-used, and doesn't need any real contingency planning (it ...


All perfectly logical, but still makes far more sense to have 12 escape shuttles that can each carry 40 people than 48 that can only carry 10. It's a one way trip that will only take a couple of hours so cramming people in like a bus is reasonable.
 
2021-03-03 11:10:29 AM  

dittybopper: Carter Pewterschmidt: Docking in the middle, the zero gravity part, is easy. Well, as easy as anything in space can be. But the escape shuttles are shown docked on the outer rim. They're essentially hanging from a ceiling, at full gravity, while spinning around. Trying to dock in that position would require reversing up to the dock at full earth gravity while also spinning around.

They're the *EMERGENCY* shuttles.  They don't *HAVE* to dock on a regular basis, they simply stay there until needed.

And you can dock them in place *BEFORE* you start the thing spinning.  If you have to replace them at some point, you secure everything in the station, stop it from spinning, dock the new lifeboats, then start it spinning again.  You wouldn't want to replace them when you have guests anyway, so you'd simply schedule a week where you do that sort of thing every few years.

And they're not hanging from a ceiling, they're hanging from a *FLOOR*.  You'd climb down into them.


Firstly, that is exactly what I said in my original comment.

And they can't be used for anything else because trying to dock one of those to a spinning space station would be utterly impossible.

And the comment about hanging from a ceiling is because they'd be hanging from it. You don't "hang from" a floor. You sit on a floor. These would be hanging. From the perspective of someone in one of these escape shuttles what is above them would be a ceiling.
 
2021-03-03 11:12:33 AM  

Slide10000: Carter Pewterschmidt: markie_farkie: Carter Pewterschmidt: trying to dock one of those to a spinning space station would be utterly impossible.

[images-wixmp-ed30a86b8c4ca887773594c2​.wixmp.com image 850x372]

Docking in the middle, the zero gravity part, is easy. Well, as easy as anything in space can be. But the escape shuttles are shown docked on the outer rim. They're essentially hanging from a ceiling, at full gravity, while spinning around. Trying to dock in that position would require reversing up to the dock at full earth gravity while also spinning around.
Try this: Get a record player and glue a lego block at the outer edge or a LP record and set it playing at 33rpm. Then try to click another lego block onto it while it's revolving. That's still going to be a hundred times easier than docking on the outer rim of a spinning space station.

/And that image appears to be a Space 1999 Eagle docking onto the 2001 space station.

I think I read somewhere that it was going to be moon gravity not Earth.  But your points still stand.


Makes sense. Why holiday in space if you're going to be at normal earth gravity? You'd want to be able to leap around a bit. You'd need some gravity to be able to walk around and keep food on the table etc.
 
2021-03-03 11:14:20 AM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: All perfectly logical, but still makes far more sense to have 12 escape shuttles that can each carry 40 people than 48 that can only carry 10. It's a one way trip that will only take a couple of hours so cramming people in like a bus is reasonable.


If you lose one out of 48 shuttles due to a problem before launch, you can probably distribute those 10 individuals to some of the other shuttles.  But 37 of the remaining 47 shuttles wouldn't have any extra people.

If you've got just 12 shuttles and one goes bad, you've got to add 3 to 4 people to *ALL* of the remaining shuttles before you launch.

Plus, if something happens to one of them on re-entry, you've lost 10 people instead of 40.
 
2021-03-03 11:16:10 AM  
Wow these assholes are aimed at bilking the very bottom of the barrel dumb asses with this one.
They claim to have all that ready in just 6 years.
But a quick google away for
"how long did the ISS take to build "

and you get told that the I.S.S. took 10 years to assemble.


yeah they're gonna do all that in just 7 years, swear it, give us your monye and sign right here please.
 
2021-03-03 11:53:58 AM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: dittybopper: Carter Pewterschmidt: Docking in the middle, the zero gravity part, is easy. Well, as easy as anything in space can be. But the escape shuttles are shown docked on the outer rim. They're essentially hanging from a ceiling, at full gravity, while spinning around. Trying to dock in that position would require reversing up to the dock at full earth gravity while also spinning around.

They're the *EMERGENCY* shuttles.  They don't *HAVE* to dock on a regular basis, they simply stay there until needed.

And you can dock them in place *BEFORE* you start the thing spinning.  If you have to replace them at some point, you secure everything in the station, stop it from spinning, dock the new lifeboats, then start it spinning again.  You wouldn't want to replace them when you have guests anyway, so you'd simply schedule a week where you do that sort of thing every few years.

And they're not hanging from a ceiling, they're hanging from a *FLOOR*.  You'd climb down into them.

Firstly, that is exactly what I said in my original comment.

And they can't be used for anything else because trying to dock one of those to a spinning space station would be utterly impossible.

And the comment about hanging from a ceiling is because they'd be hanging from it. You don't "hang from" a floor. You sit on a floor. These would be hanging. From the perspective of someone in one of these escape shuttles what is above them would be a ceiling.


Even if you could dock and undock them through some kind of computer guided miracle, or if you used an arm to grab and move the shuttles into position, I'd be more concerned about the weight distribution with shuttles docking and undocking. Hell, I sort of worry about it as it is with restaurants and movie theaters. With 400 guests worth of mass moving around a spinning station like that, I can easily see that thing central axis going all over the farking place likely requiring routine stabilization corrections. Maybe they would have counterweights that slide up and down central anchor points to compensate but it just seems like one more bit of added complexity.
 
2021-03-03 12:05:20 PM  
♫ And I said what about Breakfast at Milliway's
She said I think I've done 6 impossible Things  ♫
 
2021-03-03 12:28:28 PM  
I'll wait until the next ark, thanks.
 
2021-03-03 12:45:00 PM  
Watch out for plague zombies!
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-03-03 1:44:06 PM  

Gonzo317: Seems familiar...
[Fark user image 850x529]


I just noticed how farking uncomfortable those chairs must be.
 
2021-03-03 2:31:42 PM  
Space station hotel is so pretty we have artwork of the room you're staying *in the room*
 
2021-03-03 3:17:32 PM  
Then the Vermicious Knids show up.


/SCRAM
 
2021-03-03 3:59:25 PM  

fustanella: I'll wait until the next ark, thanks.


They aren't worth the wait. Trust me.
 
2021-03-03 4:31:06 PM  
A movie theater?  Isn't the whole point the big show of endless space out of your window?  Even if this kind of thing ever happens, it will be rundown in a good 5 years for lack of parts, maintenance, staff, and all kinds of other unforeseen circumstances.
 
2021-03-03 8:28:59 PM  

Slide10000: I think I read somewhere that it was going to be moon gravity not Earth.


The Space 1999 Eagle makes more sense now.
 
2021-03-03 8:53:11 PM  
I kind of figured the first private space station would be for old wealthy people with health issues. They could live in a safe, low gravity environment.. Easy on the joints and bones, and the circulatory system as well. And even paraplegic people can move around easily.

If it cost a million bucks a week, well, what else are they going to spend money on? If you're a billionaire, you can afford 20 years in orbit!
 
2021-03-03 11:40:48 PM  
cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.netView Full Size
Private space station this decade? More like this double bubble concept from Bigelow Aerospace, which last I heard laid everyone off a year ago
 
2021-03-04 8:41:15 AM  

Pelvic Splanchnic Ganglion: I'm 100% convinced that a 400-guest space hotel will be put in orbit in a mere 6 years AND that it will be commercially viable. This doesn't sound like an investor-fleecing operation at all.


We can barely get three people to the ISS.  How the hell do they expect to get anywhere with this in 6 years?
 
2021-03-04 8:43:30 AM  

krispos42: I kind of figured the first private space station would be for old wealthy people with health issues. They could live in a safe, low gravity environment.. Easy on the joints and bones, and the circulatory system as well. And even paraplegic people can move around easily.

If it cost a million bucks a week, well, what else are they going to spend money on? If you're a billionaire, you can afford 20 years in orbit!


Getting them up there would be the biggest problem.

Would I like to see this type of thing happen?  Of course!  But the reality is we've wasted the better part of 40 years since Apollo ended with a shuttle that was only approved because they could stuff military satellites in it, and endless military spending to blow holes in the desert.
 
2021-03-04 8:58:50 AM  

Great_Milenko: Pelvic Splanchnic Ganglion: I'm 100% convinced that a 400-guest space hotel will be put in orbit in a mere 6 years AND that it will be commercially viable. This doesn't sound like an investor-fleecing operation at all.

We can barely get three people to the ISS.  How the hell do they expect to get anywhere with this in 6 years?


Actually, we have the capability to get up to 7 at a time there with the Dragon 2 (though NASA missions limit it to just 4), and SpaceX is still working on their Starship prototypes (successful test yesterday!), which will have the capacity to take up to 100 people at a time up to low Earth orbit.

Six years might be a bit optimistic, but certainly by the end of this decade I can see it being done.   Whether or not it will be profitable remains to be seen, but once you get the cost per flight down using big, mass produced, reusable rockets like Starship, it might well become economically viable.
 
Displayed 42 of 42 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.