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(Some Guy)   Subby is looking to buy a cast iron griddle like the one in the link but is scared to take the plunge into cast iron cooking. Anyone with experience with similar items and how to care for cast iron cookware in general?   (lodgecastiron.com) divider line
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474 clicks; posted to Food » on 02 Mar 2021 at 3:35 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-03-02 2:54:19 PM  
If you're concerned about the care needed on cast iron, try this:
Link to ceramic coated version
 
2021-03-02 2:55:36 PM  
You're scared? This is the sort of thing that frightens you? What do you imagine will happen?
 
2021-03-02 2:55:52 PM  
Lodge makes quality stuff.
It's easy to clean. Hot water, no soap, dry before you out it away, lightly oiled with plain vegetable oil.
It doesn't take a lot of heat, and let the pan get hot.
I had a griddle and it was great, but got lost in a move.
 
2021-03-02 2:56:09 PM  
oh look. It's this thread again
 
2021-03-02 2:57:08 PM  

Hubris Boy: You're scared? This is the sort of thing that frightens you? What do you imagine will happen?


That you won't be paying attention, and you'll make a tomato based pasta sauce and strip the seasoning and poison yourself?

/I don't think you'd poison yourself
//would it make your meal taste bad?
 
2021-03-02 2:57:09 PM  
Dip it in salt water and hang it out back in the sun. That's the 'seasoning' cast iron needs, the flavor is in the authentic rust.
 
2021-03-02 2:57:48 PM  

Gubbo: Hubris Boy: You're scared? This is the sort of thing that frightens you? What do you imagine will happen?

That you won't be paying attention, and you'll make a tomato based pasta sauce and strip the seasoning and poison yourself?

/I don't think you'd poison yourself
//would it make your meal taste bad?


Oh it's a griddle. Nevermind.
 
2021-03-02 2:58:35 PM  
make sure you get the proper-sized special dishwasher jet nozzle and don't forget the plastic tools so you don't scratch the metal
 
2021-03-02 2:58:59 PM  
If you run it through your dishwasher, you aren't considered human.
 
2021-03-02 3:00:05 PM  
Be sure and clean it occasionally with a 50/50 mix of Clorox and Ammonia.
/sarc
 
2021-03-02 3:03:27 PM  
People put a lot of emphasis on cleaning cast iron and insist you never use soap or only scrub it out with salt or a whole host of other stupid maintenance procedures. Cast iron is nearly indestructible as a cooking surface, and while you can ruin the seasoning, you have to really screw up to get to the stage where it's an issue.

When you need to clean cast iron, boil water in it, scrub the bits out with a nylon brush. Set back over the heat to dry completely, then oil lightly while still warm. It will last forever.
 
2021-03-02 3:08:31 PM  
They're basically indestructible. I have one from the 1920's or 30's I got from my grandparents and have cooked on it over an open flame, on my gas grill, even a dual burner hot plate hooked up to a gas generator. Even if you leave it out in the yard for a year you can scrape off the rust and re-season it. Just make sure to use patience and let it heat up before putting food on it to cook, and use some kind of fat (butter, bacon grease, oil). Older cast iron was buffed to a mirror finish and functions almost like non-stick Teflon when used properly, but modern cast iron (Lodge, et. al) isn't finished to the same standard and needs a fat of some kind between the surface and the food, at least until it's been well used and well seasoned.
 
2021-03-02 3:08:38 PM  
I've never understood the "oh, they're so hard to take care of!" comments with respect to cast iron cookware in general, and griddles in particular.  Once it's properly set up and seasoned when new, here's what you need to do for general maintenance:

1.  Wash it thoroughly with dish soap and water after using it to cook, and don't leave it sitting dirty in the sink with other dirty dishes/pans.

2.  After washing and rinsing, thoroughly dry it with a dish towel and then put it back in the drawer.

That's about it.  And as long as you use some form of oil when cooking with it, you don't even really need to coat it with oil to store it.
 
2021-03-02 3:18:35 PM  

Cyberluddite: Wash it thoroughly with dish soap


That's a terrible notion and you should stop that. If you got something stuck to it, boil some water in it and just wipe it off when it comes loose.
 
2021-03-02 3:21:20 PM  
I've noticed a few chefs using a method that I've since adopted and have been using for years.

To clean, hot water, steel wool, and occasionally a bit of coarse salt. Dry completely. Wipe every inch of the dry pan with Flaxseed or grapeseed oil. Something low smoke point. Outside and inside. You want to coat it, but not have any excess. It shouldn't drip. Put in the oven at 450 or 500 for an hour. Turn the oven off, let the cast iron cool before you take it out.

Mine look great, taste great, and this method has worked great.

When you get your cast iron new, do this process a few times to get it seasoned, but keep an eye on how much oil, because too much will scrape off in layers when cooking.
 
2021-03-02 3:23:08 PM  

arrogantbastich: If you got something stuck to it, boil some water in it and just wipe it off when it comes loose.


Or, optionally pour it off in a bowl and declare it gravy.
 
2021-03-02 3:34:45 PM  

arrogantbastich: Cyberluddite: Wash it thoroughly with dish soap

That's a terrible notion and you should stop that. If you got something stuck to it, boil some water in it and just wipe it off when it comes loose.


Tough to do with a griddle.
 
2021-03-02 3:37:54 PM  
I looked those then I found this.
scontent-sjc3-1.xx.fbcdn.netView Full Size


But really, pull the trigger and cook on it.
 
2021-03-02 3:39:00 PM  
This is an honest question for stubby or anyone else: Why would you want a cast iron griddle as opposed to a cast iron skillet or frying pan? I'm not shiatting on the idea, in genuinely curious. I can't really think of anything you could do on a griddle that you couldn't do in a frying pan, and it would probably season better.

Maybe camping, but still.
 
2021-03-02 3:41:11 PM  

arrogantbastich: Cyberluddite: Wash it thoroughly with dish soap

That's a terrible notion and you should stop that. If you got something stuck to it, boil some water in it and just wipe it off when it comes loose.


Why? Washing cask iron with soap is fine, it's actually how you get it nice and clean.
 
2021-03-02 3:41:50 PM  

AnotherBluesStringer: This is an honest question for stubby or anyone else: Why would you want a cast iron griddle as opposed to a cast iron skillet or frying pan? I'm not shiatting on the idea, in genuinely curious. I can't really think of anything you could do on a griddle that you couldn't do in a frying pan, and it would probably season better.

Maybe camping, but still.


More cooking space.
 
2021-03-02 3:42:42 PM  

pounddawg: AnotherBluesStringer: This is an honest question for stubby or anyone else: Why would you want a cast iron griddle as opposed to a cast iron skillet or frying pan? I'm not shiatting on the idea, in genuinely curious. I can't really think of anything you could do on a griddle that you couldn't do in a frying pan, and it would probably season better.

Maybe camping, but still.

More cooking space.


Good point. I guess that's true.
 
2021-03-02 3:42:44 PM  

AnotherBluesStringer: This is an honest question for stubby or anyone else: Why would you want a cast iron griddle as opposed to a cast iron skillet or frying pan? I'm not shiatting on the idea, in genuinely curious. I can't really think of anything you could do on a griddle that you couldn't do in a frying pan, and it would probably season better.

Maybe camping, but still.


Difficult to get a spatula around the lip of a skillet to flip flap jacks.
See also - Grilling large fish fillet, shish kebabs, multiple hamburgers, steaks, etc... at the same time.
 
2021-03-02 3:44:01 PM  
I have one of those. It's great for certain things, but with just me and my husband, it doesn't get much use other than camping. If you have a family, sure... but if it's just you or you +1, get a cast iron pan instead.
 
2021-03-02 3:45:59 PM  
Wash cast iron with hot water, and dry on the stove to make sure no water remains on the pan. Do not use soap, it destroys the seasoning. If you have something stuck on the pan so bad you must use soap to get rid of it, you should re-season the pan.
 
2021-03-02 3:46:51 PM  
Lodge makes quality stuff.  and it's excellent entry level cast iron because it is "pre-seasoned"  so all you have to do is follow the instructions and don't scour or soap it, and it will remain that way and be basically non-stick.

It takes a bit longer to heat cast iron but it also holds its heat MUCH longer so if you are used to cooking on, say "high"   you'll want to dial it back to Medium or Medium high at the most and shorten your cook times.   But I love mine.   I have a whole set of lodge and use it constantly (sometimes switching out for the hard anodized set my family got me for Christmas this year
 
2021-03-02 3:49:11 PM  

cretinbob: Lodge makes quality stuff.
It's easy to clean. Hot water, no soap, dry before you out it away, lightly oiled with plain vegetable oil.
It doesn't take a lot of heat, and let the pan get hot.
I had a griddle and it was great, but got lost in a move.


Lodge used to make quality stuff.  Now the finish is the same as anything imported from China.  May as well import it from China.  Iron is iron, the difference between manufacturers is finish, and Lodge's finish is shiat lately.
 
2021-03-02 3:49:20 PM  
Subby here. Thanks for your "feedback" ;-)

I want a griddle rather than a pan as I find myself cooking things that need more space than a pan can take. The item linked covers two equal sized burners on my range so can be used to evenly cook a variety of things. What I'm scared of is the non-stick aspect as I'm tired of teflon and other coatings failing and my food sticking to the pans. I will mosty cook meat, but also other things that need dry frying such as (English) muffins. My main concern is the care, cleaning and reseaoning.

Thanks!
 
2021-03-02 3:49:39 PM  

max_pooper: arrogantbastich: Cyberluddite: Wash it thoroughly with dish soap

That's a terrible notion and you should stop that. If you got something stuck to it, boil some water in it and just wipe it off when it comes loose.

Why? Washing cask iron with soap is fine, it's actually how you get it nice and clean.


I've never used soap on my cast iron skillet, and it's clean. Soap is not needed if the pan is properly seasoned.
 
2021-03-02 3:53:23 PM  

Gubbo: Hubris Boy: You're scared? This is the sort of thing that frightens you? What do you imagine will happen?

That you won't be paying attention, and you'll make a tomato based pasta sauce and strip the seasoning and poison yourself?

/I don't think you'd poison yourself
//would it make your meal taste bad?


It does.  I do braises in my enameled dutch oven because the plain cast iron one makes acidic stuff taste like metal.  I make bread and fry stuff in the plain one.
 
2021-03-02 3:53:35 PM  

Swiss Colony: Subby here. Thanks for your "feedback" ;-)

I want a griddle rather than a pan as I find myself cooking things that need more space than a pan can take. The item linked covers two equal sized burners on my range so can be used to evenly cook a variety of things. What I'm scared of is the non-stick aspect as I'm tired of teflon and other coatings failing and my food sticking to the pans. I will mosty cook meat, but also other things that need dry frying such as (English) muffins. My main concern is the care, cleaning and reseaoning.

Thanks!


If you're going from non-stick to cast iron, you'll probably have a bit of a leaning curve with some meats. The key is to be patient. For example some steaks will stick a bit, but release after the fat and water has cooked out a bit. This is a good thing. You definitely won't play in the pan as much. Also, I've found that some meats aren't really great for cast iron. Like duck. Nonstick works great for duck breasts because of the skin and fat content. It's not that you can't do it, but I wouldn't advise it. You'll pick it up quick.
 
2021-03-02 3:54:51 PM  
If you want to up your griddle game, go for something like this:

Fark user imageView Full Size


Propane-fired.  This is a single burner model.  The two and 3 burner ones aren't really portable, but give you much more flexibility when cooking meals.  You can have one side hot for frying stuff, and the other side on low  just to keep things warm, brown hamburger buns, etc.

I do steaks on there to sear them, and then finish in the oven to get the centers done to whatever rareness floats your boat.

Hash browns, scrambled eggs, sausage, bacon, etc are perfect griddle items.  This one's super easy to clean.  Scrape everything out the back into the waste catcher, then turn it up until it starts smoking, scrape some more, hit it with water, another scrape, then turn off the heat and apply a very thin layer of high smoke point oil to the entire surface and exterior, and let it cool down before giving it a last quick wipe with a no-lint cloth.

Obviously this isn't intended for indoor use, so the stove-top griddle option is also useful, although from personal experience it's tough to get even heating on those.
 
2021-03-02 3:59:49 PM  

Swiss Colony: Subby here. Thanks for your "feedback" ;-)

I want a griddle rather than a pan as I find myself cooking things that need more space than a pan can take. The item linked covers two equal sized burners on my range so can be used to evenly cook a variety of things. What I'm scared of is the non-stick aspect as I'm tired of teflon and other coatings failing and my food sticking to the pans. I will mosty cook meat, but also other things that need dry frying such as (English) muffins. My main concern is the care, cleaning and reseaoning.

Thanks!


DO EEET.

It's just a big ol' chunk of metal. You aren't going to hurt it.
 
2021-03-02 4:06:59 PM  

AnotherBluesStringer: This is an honest question for stubby or anyone else: Why would you want a cast iron griddle as opposed to a cast iron skillet or frying pan? I'm not shiatting on the idea, in genuinely curious. I can't really think of anything you could do on a griddle that you couldn't do in a frying pan, and it would probably season better.

Maybe camping, but still.


Ours is pretty exclusively used for smash burgers or seared tuna and would probably only be used for the burgers if I ever buy a decent fish spatula.
 
2021-03-02 4:08:33 PM  
Hi guys , what's happening in this thread?

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-03-02 4:09:11 PM  

pounddawg: I looked those then I found this.
[scontent-sjc3-1.xx.fbcdn.net image 850x637]

But really, pull the trigger and cook on it.


still so very jelly! want!! I know there are some farkers who have one of those.

but yeah Subs, just buy the farking thing. you really can't go far wrong with Lodge. or the now-equivalent versions from Gyna. unless you're up to trolling yard-sales and dead great-grandmothers.
 
2021-03-02 4:15:12 PM  

Cyberluddite: arrogantbastich: Cyberluddite: Wash it thoroughly with dish soap

That's a terrible notion and you should stop that. If you got something stuck to it, boil some water in it and just wipe it off when it comes loose.

Tough to do with a griddle.


Better than making your food taste like dawn.
 
2021-03-02 4:16:38 PM  

max_pooper: arrogantbastich: Cyberluddite: Wash it thoroughly with dish soap

That's a terrible notion and you should stop that. If you got something stuck to it, boil some water in it and just wipe it off when it comes loose.

Why? Washing cask iron with soap is fine, it's actually how you get it nice and clean.


If you want a nice and clean pan, get a steel one and scour it like a peasant.
 
2021-03-02 4:22:09 PM  
and tbh Subs, I've had the same exact Lodge pan on my wishlist since for the evars. only thing preventing that occurrence is (a.) already daily our hard-anodized calphalon 11"sq grill-pan, and (2.) poor AF.

likely there are also aluminum variants which would be fine, but me, I'd still save my pennies for the cast-iron.
 
2021-03-02 4:23:02 PM  

Evil Mackerel: Hi guys , what's happening in this thread?

[Fark user image 850x850]


sooooo want a hearth and a hob...
 
2021-03-02 4:24:12 PM  

Swiss Colony: Subby here. Thanks for your "feedback" ;-)

I want a griddle rather than a pan as I find myself cooking things that need more space than a pan can take. The item linked covers two equal sized burners on my range so can be used to evenly cook a variety of things. What I'm scared of is the non-stick aspect as I'm tired of teflon and other coatings failing and my food sticking to the pans. I will mosty cook meat, but also other things that need dry frying such as (English) muffins. My main concern is the care, cleaning and reseaoning.

Thanks!


I have a similar one, like this:
Fark user imageView Full Size


Flat one side for pancakes etc, ribbed the other for steaks etc.

Works great, cleaning is easy. They're pretty much indestructible. Just scrape it, wash it with water, no soap, and that's pretty much it. I use the flat side more, for all sorts of things from bacon and eggs to pancakes. I used it an hour ago to warm up naan breads.
 
2021-03-02 4:28:38 PM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: Swiss Colony: Subby here. Thanks for your "feedback" ;-)

I want a griddle rather than a pan as I find myself cooking things that need more space than a pan can take. The item linked covers two equal sized burners on my range so can be used to evenly cook a variety of things. What I'm scared of is the non-stick aspect as I'm tired of teflon and other coatings failing and my food sticking to the pans. I will mosty cook meat, but also other things that need dry frying such as (English) muffins. My main concern is the care, cleaning and reseaoning.

Thanks!

I have a similar one, like this:
[Fark user image 850x850]

Flat one side for pancakes etc, ribbed the other for steaks etc.

Works great, cleaning is easy. They're pretty much indestructible. Just scrape it, wash it with water, no soap, and that's pretty much it. I use the flat side more, for all sorts of things from bacon and eggs to pancakes. I used it an hour ago to warm up naan breads.


Man.  I saw one of those at Goodwill and like a fool I thought I'd pick it up later.  GONE!
 
2021-03-02 4:32:44 PM  
If I could have one pan in my kitchen it would be a 12 in. cast iron frying pan.

You can use it for almost anything, and almost anywhere.

I have 2 frying pans that are about 50 years old. I fry food, bake biscuits, etc. in both of them. I also wash them with soap when necessary, If there is sticky stuff on them boil water in them and use a Choir Boy to get it off.(I usually just use hot water to clean them with a good wipe down after) and they remain well seasoned.

Seems like there is a cast iron thread about once a week. Some people are careful with cast iron, and some are not. Cast iron pans are not sacred. They are a tool, and if you do something stupid and let them rust, they are fairly easy to clean and re-season. They don't wear out, and are cheap to buy or replace.

Get one and just start cooking with it after doing the seasoning thing.
 
2021-03-02 4:42:59 PM  
The bigger concern is how to correctly cook in a cast iron pan. Cast iron retains heat really, really well, so you don't just turn the thing up to 11 and walk away. Don't heat it past the point that you want to cook at, it will take a long time to cool down. It seems like a simple, minor thing, but it can cause real issues...

But they're great, my wife has a huge skillet with the porcelain coating, a cast iron dutch oven, and a standard black cast ironn skillet, and they all have their uses and get cooked in rather frequently.
 
2021-03-02 4:49:17 PM  

arrogantbastich: Cyberluddite: Wash it thoroughly with dish soap

That's a terrible notion and you should stop that. If you got something stuck to it, boil some water in it and just wipe it off when it comes loose.


Hard to do with a griddle.
 
2021-03-02 4:51:15 PM  

rosekolodny: Carter Pewterschmidt: Swiss Colony: Subby here. Thanks for your "feedback" ;-)

I want a griddle rather than a pan as I find myself cooking things that need more space than a pan can take. The item linked covers two equal sized burners on my range so can be used to evenly cook a variety of things. What I'm scared of is the non-stick aspect as I'm tired of teflon and other coatings failing and my food sticking to the pans. I will mosty cook meat, but also other things that need dry frying such as (English) muffins. My main concern is the care, cleaning and reseaoning.

Thanks!

I have a similar one, like this:
[Fark user image 850x850]

Flat one side for pancakes etc, ribbed the other for steaks etc.

Works great, cleaning is easy. They're pretty much indestructible. Just scrape it, wash it with water, no soap, and that's pretty much it. I use the flat side more, for all sorts of things from bacon and eggs to pancakes. I used it an hour ago to warm up naan breads.

Man.  I saw one of those at Goodwill and like a fool I thought I'd pick it up later.  GONE!


They're not expensive. I got mine on ebay for £20.  God knows what they pay for postage because they weigh a ton.
 
2021-03-02 4:55:37 PM  

vudukungfu: oh look. It's this thread again


Would you rather a tipping thread?
 
2021-03-02 5:00:30 PM  

Tyrone Slothrop: Wash cast iron with hot water, and dry on the stove to make sure no water remains on the pan. Do not use soap, it destroys the seasoning. If you have something stuck on the pan so bad you must use soap to get rid of it, you should re-season the pan.


You may want to tell Lodge that their recommendation of washing their cast iron cookware with soap and water is wrong. Or it could be they actually know more about cast iron than you do and you're just a moran on the internet.
 
2021-03-02 5:03:51 PM  

Rene ala Carte: If I could have one pan in my kitchen it would be a 12 in. cast iron frying pan.

You can use it for almost anything, and almost anywhere.

I have 2 frying pans that are about 50 years old. I fry food, bake biscuits, etc. in both of them. I also wash them with soap when necessary, If there is sticky stuff on them boil water in them and use a Choir Boy to get it off.(I usually just use hot water to clean them with a good wipe down after) and they remain well seasoned.

Seems like there is a cast iron thread about once a week. Some people are careful with cast iron, and some are not. Cast iron pans are not sacred. They are a tool, and if you do something stupid and let them rust, they are fairly easy to clean and re-season. They don't wear out, and are cheap to buy or replace.

Get one and just start cooking with it after doing the seasoning thing.


really a fan of all ^^^this. you are doing the right stuff.

I know it's a bit reductive, but my dad always had this thing about (and I know he didn't invent it, just stolen-wisdom since small-times) -
keep 3 toolboxes:
- the tools you always use? put in the first.
- the tools you sometimes use? keep in the second.
- the nonsense you never even once used? yeah, put that in the third and then sell/donate it.

if you have a go-to, then ffs/jfc just keep goin' at it. years ago, I mocked (to my personal shame) the fact $mai_waifu owned that 11" hard-anodized grill-pan. these days? that thing is my daily driver. or making pan-pizza-of-my-childhood? you betta you betta you bet that both sides of my ancient Lodge ~8" are in play.
 
2021-03-02 5:11:09 PM  
Jesus farking cooking.

It's cast iron. Cook with it. Wash it with soap and a scrubby thing, or with chainmail, which is awesome. Dry it in the oven or on the fire. Keep it out of the dishwasher. Cook something acidic in it, if you want, but don't store it in the pan.

It's cast iron. As long as you don't let it rust for years, it'll be fine. Most important thing is to make sure you wash it and dry it thoroughly. Don't worry about soap, or metal utensils, or scrubbing it with salt harvested from the tears of whichever political party you don't like.

Just wash it with dish soap -- as long as it doesn't contain lye (which no modern soap or detergent does) -- and dry it thoroughly. It'll live longer than you.

As far as that specific Lodge goes: It's heavy as fark, which is no fun on a Saturday morning. But it heats evenly if you preheat it for 10 or 15 minutes. Makes great pancakes.
 
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