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(The Conversation)   How covid has changed the way we give birth. Well, sorta   (theconversation.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Childbirth, Pregnancy, Obstetrics, expectant woman, low risk of complications, Infant, positive experience, skills of baby care  
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395 clicks; posted to STEM » on 02 Mar 2021 at 10:21 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



23 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-03-02 10:30:08 PM  
"Midwives play a key role in this"

Really?  I thought midwife was almost extinct as a function.  The term feels "back East" or Continental to me.
 
2021-03-02 10:53:09 PM  
Me: This sounds like an ad for a midwife.

Author: Alison first qualified as a general nurse in 1988 and following several years as a nurse in gynaecology and care of the elderly, moved into Midwifery

In summary, a person selling X is here to tell us how now is a uniquely great time for X. How interesting and unexpected!
 
2021-03-02 11:05:41 PM  

SansNeural: "Midwives play a key role in this"

Really?  I thought midwife was almost extinct as a function.  The term feels "back East" or Continental to me.


I had a nurse-midwife as my primary prenatal caregiver with first kid, eighteen years ago.
 
2021-03-02 11:32:28 PM  
2020 childbirth:

static1.srcdn.comView Full Size
 
2021-03-03 12:12:03 AM  
Are you people 90 or something? I'm 40 and can't think of a single friend or relative who didn't use a midwife. I have a close friend CURRENTLY IN LABOUR who's using a midwife (seriously).
My architecture firm designed a birthing center about 10 years ago, where midwives help deliver children in a non-hospital setting. Which makes sense to me, though I don't have any kids.
 
2021-03-03 1:28:06 AM  
Why would anyone want to give birth out of hospital, without a doctor helping? What if there are complications or something?
 
2021-03-03 2:36:19 AM  
This is largely true in the U.K. with its Byzantine Covid rules which made it legal for your partner, doula, doctor, and midwife have a pint at the pub together but bans you from wearing masks and being together In a birthing room. Completely misguided and counterproductive.
 
2021-03-03 2:56:45 AM  

Grahor: Why would anyone want to give birth out of hospital, without a doctor helping? What if there are complications or something?


My oldest son had the umbilical cord wrapped around his neck. This was never apparent on the ultrasounds so nobody had any idea of the risk. It tightened like a noose in the birth canal. He was a horrifying shade of blue, didn't breathe and was completely limp. I don't think it took them two minutes to have him hooked up to the proper equipment that allowed trained professionals to save his life but it felt like the longest minutes ever. He's a healthy, flourishing kid now. Had we had to wait for an ambulance to come to our house, he'd be in a tiny coffin now and we would be crying at his grave every year instead of having fun birthday parties.

TL;DR: Don't be a dumbass.
 
2021-03-03 8:19:23 AM  

slantsix: Are you people 90 or something? I'm 40 and can't think of a single friend or relative who didn't use a midwife. I have a close friend CURRENTLY IN LABOUR who's using a midwife (seriously).
My architecture firm designed a birthing center about 10 years ago, where midwives help deliver children in a non-hospital setting. Which makes sense to me, though I don't have any kids.


I'm 39 and everyone I know has given birth at a hospital. Using a midwife seems like something you do when there aren't hospitals and modern medicine.
 
2021-03-03 8:58:50 AM  

OldJames: slantsix: Are you people 90 or something? I'm 40 and can't think of a single friend or relative who didn't use a midwife. I have a close friend CURRENTLY IN LABOUR who's using a midwife (seriously).
My architecture firm designed a birthing center about 10 years ago, where midwives help deliver children in a non-hospital setting. Which makes sense to me, though I don't have any kids.

I'm 39 and everyone I know has given birth at a hospital. Using a midwife seems like something you do when there aren't hospitals and modern medicine.


I've heard the argument from a few that women have been giving birth for millions of years without doctors and hospitals are inherently risky and unsafe because they make the mother nervous.

\Alternatively unclean water, foraging, living in trees, dying in your 20s, and double digit percentage of risk of babies being stillborn or mothers doing during childbirth were all true for millions of years
\\The amount of people that seem to eschew exactly the technology and knowledge we've gained that makes it possible for them to have that choice kind of blows my mind
 
2021-03-03 9:57:38 AM  

OldJames: slantsix: Are you people 90 or something? I'm 40 and can't think of a single friend or relative who didn't use a midwife. I have a close friend CURRENTLY IN LABOUR who's using a midwife (seriously).
My architecture firm designed a birthing center about 10 years ago, where midwives help deliver children in a non-hospital setting. Which makes sense to me, though I don't have any kids.

I'm 39 and everyone I know has given birth at a hospital. Using a midwife seems like something you do when there aren't hospitals and modern medicine.


Bingo. It's what you do when you want to increase the odds of something terrible happening rather than decrease them. I think a lot of people don't realize that the caesarean section had only been performed on dead mothers until relatively recently.
 
2021-03-03 11:14:51 AM  

SansNeural: "Midwives play a key role in this"

Really?  I thought midwife was almost extinct as a function.  The term feels "back East" or Continental to me.


My eldest was born sixish years ago, if he hadn't been a unique little snowflake of a kid and hadn't gotten stuck he would have been born in a birth center near to a hospital, but not in it, with midwives.  He ended up being a c-section because he wanted to come out face first, which obviously happened in a hospital.

My youngest was born at home with two midwives.

Midwifery is hardly extinct.  That said, this article is a thinly veiled ad for midwives to counteract exactly what you are saying.
 
2021-03-03 12:45:38 PM  

OldJames: slantsix: Are you people 90 or something? I'm 40 and can't think of a single friend or relative who didn't use a midwife. I have a close friend CURRENTLY IN LABOUR who's using a midwife (seriously).
My architecture firm designed a birthing center about 10 years ago, where midwives help deliver children in a non-hospital setting. Which makes sense to me, though I don't have any kids.

I'm 39 and everyone I know has given birth at a hospital. Using a midwife seems like something you do when there aren't hospitals and modern medicine.


Midwives and hospitals are not mutually exclusive. Kid 1 was born in hospital with midwife.
 
2021-03-03 3:40:04 PM  
None of my 5 kids involved a mid wife. Or a wet nurse.
 
2021-03-03 4:35:56 PM  
Maybe I didn't explain very well. There's always a doctor available for emergencies. That would be idiotic otherwise.

We have a modern, western medical system. Some women just don't feel the want or need for a doctor in the room at the time of birth. They get all the regular and typical prenatal and postnatal doctor care that they need, just like everyone else.

/my friend is still in labour, poor woman
 
2021-03-03 6:11:12 PM  

Ambitwistor: 2020 childbirth:

[static1.srcdn.com image 740x370]


your Facehugger is so cute!!

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-03-03 6:12:02 PM  

slantsix: Maybe I didn't explain very well. There's always a doctor available for emergencies. That would be idiotic otherwise.

We have a modern, western medical system. Some women just don't feel the want or need for a doctor in the room at the time of birth. They get all the regular and typical prenatal and postnatal doctor care that they need, just like everyone else.

/my friend is still in labour, poor woman


like pushing a potatoe thru a straw.
 
2021-03-03 6:14:33 PM  

Grahor: Why would anyone want to give birth out of hospital, without a doctor helping? What if there are complications or something?


what if healthcare is very expensive in the "greatest country on earth"??
 
2021-03-03 6:15:38 PM  

slantsix: Are you people 90 or something? I'm 40 and can't think of a single friend or relative who didn't use a midwife. I have a close friend CURRENTLY IN LABOUR who's using a midwife (seriously).
My architecture firm designed a birthing center about 10 years ago, where midwives help deliver children in a non-hospital setting. Which makes sense to me, though I don't have any kids.


wow, another smart one.   well done
same here
lolzz
 
2021-03-03 6:17:54 PM  

SansNeural: "Midwives play a key role in this"

Really?  I thought midwife was almost extinct as a function.  The term feels "back East" or Continental to me.


midwives are much cheaper than expensive overpriced hospitals/doctors in "the greatest country on earth".

ever try buying a tylenol pill in a hospital??
 
2021-03-03 8:49:58 PM  

Linux_Yes: SansNeural: "Midwives play a key role in this"

Really?  I thought midwife was almost extinct as a function.  The term feels "back East" or Continental to me.

midwives are much cheaper than expensive overpriced hospitals/doctors in "the greatest country on earth".

ever try buying a tylenol pill in a hospital??


If you go to the pharmacy or giftshop downstairs, it's no side than buying a bottle at CVS.

If you are a patient and they have to track the pills, have the pharmacy dispense it, they check for interactions because you could be in all kinds of stuff orally, intravenously, etc... Then a doctor or nurse bring it you, then there's overhead cost in liability and other factors that make it higher than seems reasonable. I won't lie there's an upcharge, but it's not as crazy as you are trying to make it sound.

And it's one thing to say it's overpriced, and find a good medical based birthing facility, and feel free to use a doula or a midwife. But it's another to accept the risk of birthing in an ill equipped facility or at home because you can't value the life of your child or your self/wife.

Birthing is fraught with risks, why take unnecessary ones? There's a lot of reasons a midwife costs less than a qualified doctor.
 
2021-03-03 10:07:58 PM  
They're allowing fewer people in the delivery room, now?

Fark user imageView Full Size


Using a midwife means you wouldn't have access to the machine that goes *ping*.
 
2021-03-04 5:01:59 AM  

Shelbyraed: Midwives and hospitals are not mutually exclusive. Kid 1 was born in hospital with midwife.


That's how it's done over here as well. Midwife is along for the ride checking up on contractions and dilation, doctor comes in when baby is about to come out. Or midman as was the case with our youngest.
 
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