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(Travel and Leisure)   "From the first espresso to the final digestivo, the Italian day is infused with intricate rules around how, when, why, and with whom you share meals and imbibe with on fine wine"   (travelandleisure.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Coffee, Espresso, Drink, lines of ice cream lovers, Alcoholic beverage, snack time, Starbucks-equivalent latte, coffee shop  
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513 clicks; posted to Food » on 02 Mar 2021 at 8:50 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



22 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-03-02 9:44:19 AM  
I took a night train in Italy, and the conductor asked in the morning if I wanted espresso.  I said no. Later, getting increasingly hungry, I flagged him down and asked when breakfast would be available.  Annoyed, he replied that I had turned down breakfast already.  I clarified that I didn't want espresso, but I did want food.  He retorted, "What were you expecting, spaghetti?" and stormed off, no doubt rolling his eyes at the tourist, but did eventually return with a pastry.

Thus I learned the meaning of "espresso" in Italy.
 
2021-03-02 10:36:55 AM  
FTFA:
For dinner, there's an antipasto, where you'll find cured meats, olives, artichokes, and more followed by a pasta (primo), a protein (secondo), a side dish (contorno), and a dessert (dolce). Hungry yet?

You better damn well be! Unless you're eating family-style with a lot of people (another bullet on the list), that's just too much food to order in a restaurant for two people.
 
2021-03-02 10:53:57 AM  

mekkab: FTFA:
For dinner, there's an antipasto, where you'll find cured meats, olives, artichokes, and more followed by a pasta (primo), a protein (secondo), a side dish (contorno), and a dessert (dolce). Hungry yet?

You better damn well be! Unless you're eating family-style with a lot of people (another bullet on the list), that's just too much food to order in a restaurant for two people.


Depends on portion size.
 
2021-03-02 11:08:54 AM  
I'd love a collection of "here's how our days actually go" from around the world, with the locals calling out when something they do is typical or atypical for the area. Down to fairly fine-grained places. I always wonder if stuff like this holds true all over a country, or just some parts. Like how a daily routine for someone in New York is way different from someone in North Dakota, you know? Gotta figure that, say, Parisians have different daily habits than people in rural Provence, or even Lyonnaise (I've seen the audience on French game shows, I know the whole country's not all rail-thin 8s and up), suburbanites different from those who live in the city proper, Romans different from Milanese, et c.

Ditto daily food. That'd be really interesting. I've seen a photo series that did that for a few families in a few countries, having them pose with the food they'd eat in a week spread out on a table. Something like that but larger-scale would be cool.
 
2021-03-02 11:16:48 AM  

Ambitwistor: mekkab: FTFA:
For dinner, there's an antipasto, where you'll find cured meats, olives, artichokes, and more followed by a pasta (primo), a protein (secondo), a side dish (contorno), and a dessert (dolce). Hungry yet?

You better damn well be! Unless you're eating family-style with a lot of people (another bullet on the list), that's just too much food to order in a restaurant for two people.

Depends on portion size.


This. Americans (on average) are used to receiving oversized portions, with extras they can take home in bags. That wasn't a common thing in much of Europe. Depending on the country, even sharing plates of appetizers might be seen as a bit odd. However in Italy it isn't uncommon to have a family style meal, or to get realistic portions. When my wife and I were in Firenze "recently" (about a month pre-C19) we stopped at one of the more tourist places (Osteria All'antico Vinaio) and got a La favolosa. While good, it was obviously a very tourist thing because the sheer size of the sandwich was way more than one person could hope to eat. Most of our other meals, even to go food like supplì in Roma, was much more realistically portioned. A couple of the places we stopped to eat at had two person meal variations with everything from start to finish portioned out for two people eating a longer, relaxed meal, with the final item (often Limoncello) being drunk over conversation. The wait staff would even converse with us, of they were family owned, at a few locations despite my terrible Italian (which is based off my mediocre Spanish) language skills. Keep in mind that a meal could easily take an hour if they were rushing you, we often took ninety minutes to finish.
 
2021-03-02 11:28:31 AM  
It's important to remember that in most of Europe they eat dinner late. Often starting at eight or 9 o'clock and going until midnight. They don't gobble their food. And there's lots of conversation. It is a very relaxing way to end the day.
 
2021-03-02 12:07:20 PM  

inglixthemad: La favolosa


holy-balls does that ever look good!

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-03-02 12:19:28 PM  

mekkab: FTFA:
For dinner, there's an antipasto, where you'll find cured meats, olives, artichokes, and more followed by a pasta (primo), a protein (secondo), a side dish (contorno), and a dessert (dolce). Hungry yet?

You better damn well be! Unless you're eating family-style with a lot of people (another bullet on the list), that's just too much food to order in a restaurant for two people.


About 2 years ago my wife and I went to Europe and met up with two of our Italian exchange students. We went to this restaurant in Rome. Small place, you shared a table with other patrons, no menu (you ate what they were making that day).

First were assorted appetizers, then the antipasto, two pasta dishes (one with a red sauce and one with a white). They just brought out bowls and plates of food. We couldn't finish the Weenersa and when the waiter came by he shook his head, said, "No!" and scraped the remainder onto our plates. We were so stuffed we asked the waiter to skip the meat course. The table red was fantastic and then with desert they brought out an ice cold bottle of in-house made amaro.

When we were leaving, I had our student tell the owner that it was the best meal I had ever eaten and I actually hugged him and kissed him on the cheeks! Food's gotta be damn good to get this Chicago guy to do that.
 
2021-03-02 12:19:35 PM  

tintar: inglixthemad: La favolosa

holy-balls does that ever look good!

[Fark user image 550x309]


I didn't know if it would work with the (not really) spicy eggplant, but damn it was a great sandwich. They try to be good neighbors to the other vendors as well. They had three (!) shops right by each other with lines out the door. The lines moved fairly quickly, but they'd have someone come outside regularly and make sure their customer lines weren't blocking other business entrances. The price wasn't bad either, I think it was less than €5.

We were going to order two sandwiches, but were glad we didn't after we got the sandwich. Their sandwiches were/are HUUGGGEEEE! Took us more than one try to finish it, and we were walking almost the entire time in Firenze. We definitely liked it better than the steak at Trattoria dall'Oste. The steak was competently done, a good cut, seasoned properly, but the sandwich was just superior in terms of taste.
 
2021-03-02 12:22:46 PM  
This is how the rest of Europe does it:

Kroll Show - Spotted Ox Hostel
Youtube 1YCOT5LasKc
 
2021-03-02 12:26:28 PM  

inglixthemad: tintar: inglixthemad: La favolosa

holy-balls does that ever look good!

[Fark user image 550x309]

I didn't know if it would work with the (not really) spicy eggplant, but damn it was a great sandwich. They try to be good neighbors to the other vendors as well. They had three (!) shops right by each other with lines out the door. The lines moved fairly quickly, but they'd have someone come outside regularly and make sure their customer lines weren't blocking other business entrances. The price wasn't bad either, I think it was less than €5.

We were going to order two sandwiches, but were glad we didn't after we got the sandwich. Their sandwiches were/are HUUGGGEEEE! Took us more than one try to finish it, and we were walking almost the entire time in Firenze. We definitely liked it better than the steak at Trattoria dall'Oste. The steak was competently done, a good cut, seasoned properly, but the sandwich was just superior in terms of taste.


Killer sandwiches seem to be more common and cheaper in (at least) Mediterranean Europe (including France) because for some farking reason they can make excellent bread at like 1/3 the retail price we do in the US. It's very frustrating that all our sandwiches are either cheap and bad or very expensive but merely average by the standards of that part of Europe. But if you're starting with very bad bread, or else very expensive but OK bread, then the math can't really work out any differently.
 
2021-03-02 12:27:44 PM  

inglixthemad: tintar: inglixthemad: La favolosa

holy-balls does that ever look good!

[Fark user image 550x309]

I didn't know if it would work with the (not really) spicy eggplant, but damn it was a great sandwich. They try to be good neighbors to the other vendors as well. They had three (!) shops right by each other with lines out the door. The lines moved fairly quickly, but they'd have someone come outside regularly and make sure their customer lines weren't blocking other business entrances. The price wasn't bad either, I think it was less than €5.

We were going to order two sandwiches, but were glad we didn't after we got the sandwich. Their sandwiches were/are HUUGGGEEEE! Took us more than one try to finish it, and we were walking almost the entire time in Firenze. We definitely liked it better than the steak at Trattoria dall'Oste. The steak was competently done, a good cut, seasoned properly, but the sandwich was just superior in terms of taste.


wow, alls I ever did in Fiorentia was guzzle gelato by the gallon (and spend hours upon hours in the Uffizi) - wish I'd had a clue back then - it was my pre-vegulon days and I'd have gone nuts on literally all of that stuff!
 
2021-03-02 1:04:33 PM  

fallingcow: Killer sandwiches seem to be more common and cheaper in (at least) Mediterranean Europe (including France) because for some farking reason they can make excellent bread at like 1/3 the retail price we do in the US. It's very frustrating that all our sandwiches are either cheap and bad or very expensive but merely average by the standards of that part of Europe. But if you're starting with very bad bread, or else very expensive but OK bread, then the math can't really work out any differently.


Italy and France definitely have bread that's pretty darn good. The French bakeries all sell baguette sandwiches, freshly made in the morning. They often get the meat from a small butcher shop, along with the veggies. So, even if you go to a "tourist trap" like Stohrer, they get their meat from the butcher across the street (et al.) however you don't want to get a baguette sandwich from the Paul chain. They are centrally made and not as good as the ones made fresh by the smaller bakers.

One place that surprised me the first time I was in Paris, enough that I took the wife when we were there together, was Le Relais de Venise son entrecôte e. Who would've thought such a "cheap" cut of steak could be so tender and flavorful? I was just exhausted after a long flight and they were near the place I was staying, and I figured if they had a line it was likely to be competent food at the least. When I brought my wife, who normally is ambivalent about fries, even she commented that their fries were pretty darn good.
 
2021-03-02 1:09:31 PM  

Schmerd1948: It's important to remember that in most of Europe they eat dinner late. Often starting at eight or 9 o'clock and going until midnight. They don't gobble their food. And there's lots of conversation. It is a very relaxing way to end the day.


Yep.  The few times I've been over there I always loved the dining experience.  No pushy waiters constantly checking in, trying to turn over the table.

Though on our first trip to Paris I think we annoyed the staff a little by basically showing up right as they were about to open for dinner service.  We sort of knew by then that dinner was traditionally later in the evening, but we had some other plans later that night.
 
2021-03-02 2:59:29 PM  
I see your italian rules and reply with my own: fark you I do what I want
 
2021-03-02 3:52:35 PM  

lifeslammer: I see your italian rules and reply with my own: fark you I do what I want


ahhh, the NY Italian American rules!
 
2021-03-02 5:10:02 PM  

mekkab: lifeslammer: I see your italian rules and reply with my own: fark you I do what I want

ahhh, the NY Italian American rules!


I rebutte this with Midwest blue-collar.

Caffeine until time for alcohol.
 
2021-03-02 6:39:35 PM  

mekkab: FTFA:
For dinner, there's an antipasto, where you'll find cured meats, olives, artichokes, and more followed by a pasta (primo), a protein (secondo), a side dish (contorno), and a dessert (dolce). Hungry yet?

You better damn well be! Unless you're eating family-style with a lot of people (another bullet on the list), that's just too much food to order in a restaurant for two people.



to be able to eat multiple courses, my wife and i order " uno per due "  one for two. you should receive one course plus two additional plates.  it is not a sin to not order a course.
 
2021-03-02 9:34:14 PM  
Never been to Italy, but did once attend a Thanksgiving dinner hosted by my wife's sister's Italian MIL. Good farking lord I was still full the next evening.
 
2021-03-02 10:17:18 PM  
Axeofjudgement: mekkab: lifeslammer: I see your italian rules and reply with my own: fark you I do what I want

ahhh, the NY Italian American rules!

I rebutte this with Midwest blue-collar.

Caffeine until time for alcohol.


Montanan.

We own both titles in both drinks: quality and quantity imbibed.

/Seriously; City Brew (coffee chain) in Montana took down an Italian espresso 'Maestro' coffee in a blind taste test. Unanimously.
//Black Widow Oatmeal Stout - most award-winning beer in America. Named for the secret ingredient in the first batch due to leaving the vat open overnight...
///"Malt, barley, hops... and just a hint of spider". Best. Beer. Ever.
 
2021-03-03 9:50:32 AM  

Jedekai: Axeofjudgement: mekkab: lifeslammer: I see your italian rules and reply with my own: fark you I do what I want

ahhh, the NY Italian American rules!

I rebutte this with Midwest blue-collar.

Caffeine until time for alcohol.

Montanan.

We own both titles in both drinks: quality and quantity imbibed.

/Seriously; City Brew (coffee chain) in Montana took down an Italian espresso 'Maestro' coffee in a blind taste test. Unanimously.
//Black Widow Oatmeal Stout - most award-winning beer in America. Named for the secret ingredient in the first batch due to leaving the vat open overnight...
///"Malt, barley, hops... and just a hint of spider". Best. Beer. Ever.


Spent 3 of the last 4 years in the Bitterroot. No knocking Florence Coffee or liquid planet either

And Scotch ale everywhere.

I loved Montana. It suited my lifestyle.
 
2021-03-03 10:04:03 AM  
oh, and - oblig.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
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