Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Daily Mail)   Don't want to bring anyone down, but we've only got about a billion years left. Happy Monday   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line
    More: Interesting  
•       •       •

732 clicks; posted to STEM » on 01 Mar 2021 at 1:19 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



22 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-03-01 1:18:07 PM  
Thank goodness I am not immortal.  That would suck in a billion years.
 
2021-03-01 1:19:58 PM  

syrynxx: Thank goodness I am not immortal.  That would suck in a billion years.


This is the exact same kind of Boomer thinking that got us where were are!

/s
 
2021-03-01 1:25:19 PM  
Electric Light Orchestra - Don't Bring Me Down (Official Video)
Youtube z9nkzaOPP6g
 
2021-03-01 1:29:42 PM  
Humanity doesn't have to worry: it's doubtful we'll last the next hundred years; there's no point in worrying about, let alone thinking about, a billion years in the future.
 
2021-03-01 1:32:05 PM  
If we reduce oxygen use we can perhaps have a few more years of the good thing.
 
2021-03-01 1:35:35 PM  
By my calculations, we don't have that long. The solar wind will get us before then
 
2021-03-01 1:37:00 PM  
Quick! Everyone I got a great idea! Hold your breaths!
 
2021-03-01 1:37:10 PM  
It doesn't matter anyway.

No life on Earth will survive in a billion years as the sun will expand and increase the temperature. The oceans will boil and the atmosphere will be evaporated into space.

Earth will look like Mars in a billion years, only as a baked desert rather than a frozen one.
 
2021-03-01 1:41:00 PM  
Fark user image
 
2021-03-01 1:43:32 PM  
img.buzzfeed.comView Full Size
 
2021-03-01 1:49:56 PM  
I thought the expansion of the sun would wipe out life in 250 million years due do increase in global temperatures.
 
2021-03-01 1:59:28 PM  

cabal_man: Humanity doesn't have to worry: it's doubtful we'll last the next hundred years; there's no point in worrying about, let alone thinking about, a billion years in the future.


If we are still confined to this planet in 100 years, over 150 years after we went to the moon, we probably aren't meant to survive.
 
2021-03-01 2:06:00 PM  
We might create a successor that doesn't need oxygen; For example we might create Machine Life, or Advanced AI. We learned to adapt our environment to suit us. The obverse of this is to modify "ourselves" to fit more environments.
 
2021-03-01 2:12:40 PM  

Ishkur: It doesn't matter anyway.

No life on Earth will survive in a billion years as the sun will expand and increase the temperature. The oceans will boil and the atmosphere will be evaporated into space.

Earth will look like Mars in a billion years, only as a baked desert rather than a frozen one.


cdn2.harryanddavid.comView Full Size


Mmmmmmm, baked dessert.....
 
2021-03-01 2:15:48 PM  

Ambivalence: I thought the expansion of the sun would wipe out life in 250 million years due do increase in global temperatures.


It's about 600 million.  And it isn't the expansion of the Sun - that won't happen for billions of years.  It is the higher heating from the Sun.  To keep itself stable, the Sun is slowly heating up.  There is a band of temperatures around the Sun that allows for liquid water.  The Earth has been in that band for most of its existence (if not its entire existence).  But as the Sun heats up, the band moves outward.  At about 600M, the inner edge of the band will be about level with the Earth's mean orbit.  Which means liquid water will be just barely able to exist.  And said water would be farking hot.  Way hotter than most non-microbial life could survive in.  And a 100M or so after that, liquid water will just not be possible on Earth.  It might still exist in the atmosphere as steam, so extremophile microbes might continue, but eventually the Earth's atmosphere will be stripped away, and that's all she wrote.
 
2021-03-01 2:28:44 PM  
Meh. We'll have evolved into beings of pure mind and energy by that point.

Or we'll have all died by cholesterol from the pork rinds and pizza shovelled down our throats. Either/or.
 
2021-03-01 3:31:27 PM  
I have even worse news.  Based on the history and timeline of mass extinction events on Earth, humans won't last anywhere near a billion years.

When you hear or read about the evolution of life on Earth you need to remember that it wasn't Earth created, then life evolved.  It was Earth created, life evolved, then got wiped out, then life evolved, then got wiped out, then life evolved, then got wiped out, then life evolved, then got wiped out, then live evolved, then got wiped out, then life evolved and here we are.

The Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event that allowed for the evolution of mammals was 65 million years ago.  The four events before that were around 205, 225, 365, & 440 million years ago.  So statistically speaking we probably have about 30 million years before the next mass extinction event.
 
2021-03-01 4:02:30 PM  

phalamir: Ambivalence: I thought the expansion of the sun would wipe out life in 250 million years due do increase in global temperatures.

It's about 600 million.  And it isn't the expansion of the Sun - that won't happen for billions of years.  It is the higher heating from the Sun.  To keep itself stable, the Sun is slowly heating up.  There is a band of temperatures around the Sun that allows for liquid water.  The Earth has been in that band for most of its existence (if not its entire existence).  But as the Sun heats up, the band moves outward.  At about 600M, the inner edge of the band will be about level with the Earth's mean orbit.  Which means liquid water will be just barely able to exist.  And said water would be farking hot.  Way hotter than most non-microbial life could survive in.  And a 100M or so after that, liquid water will just not be possible on Earth.  It might still exist in the atmosphere as steam, so extremophile microbes might continue, but eventually the Earth's atmosphere will be stripped away, and that's all she wrote.


so Mars has a chance at life? Good for them.
 
2021-03-01 9:59:21 PM  

TheYeti: cabal_man: Humanity doesn't have to worry: it's doubtful we'll last the next hundred years; there's no point in worrying about, let alone thinking about, a billion years in the future.

If we are still confined to this planet in 100 years, over 150 years after we went to the moon, we probably aren't meant to survive.


Being mostly confined to this planet for 100 more years?  Not really a big deal for humanity's long term survival, though asteroid mining could be useful, and maybe instead of fixing CO2 emissions we'll decide it's cheaper to throw a big set of Venetian blinds into orbit so we can adjust the thermostat occasionally.

A million years from now?  Yeah, by then we ought to be solidly settling usable parts of the solar system, and maybe even have sent some generation ships or at least robot ships to other stars with useful backup planets, but also by then we ought to have some decent meteor-catastrophe protection in place.

As far as "meant to survive", that's a religious question. Darwin cared, but evolution doesn't.
 
2021-03-01 9:59:24 PM  

Ambivalence: phalamir: Ambivalence: I thought the expansion of the sun would wipe out life in 250 million years due do increase in global temperatures.

It's about 600 million.  And it isn't the expansion of the Sun - that won't happen for billions of years.  It is the higher heating from the Sun.  To keep itself stable, the Sun is slowly heating up.  There is a band of temperatures around the Sun that allows for liquid water.  The Earth has been in that band for most of its existence (if not its entire existence).  But as the Sun heats up, the band moves outward.  At about 600M, the inner edge of the band will be about level with the Earth's mean orbit.  Which means liquid water will be just barely able to exist.  And said water would be farking hot.  Way hotter than most non-microbial life could survive in.  And a 100M or so after that, liquid water will just not be possible on Earth.  It might still exist in the atmosphere as steam, so extremophile microbes might continue, but eventually the Earth's atmosphere will be stripped away, and that's all she wrote.

so Mars has a chance at life? Good for them.


If Mars had any atmosphere - or magnetosphere to deflect the increased solar radiation - then yes, it would have maybe a billion years of time to try and develop a few microbes.  The weird thing is that places like the moons of Saturn might have a couple billion years in the zone during the end of the Sun's main phase and through its red giant phase.
 
2021-03-02 1:48:04 AM  
Finally, the Oxygen Catastrophe will end, and the anaerobic life will finally reclaim their dominance on this planet.  How many billions of years have they been sequestered and suffering, unable to enjoy the splendor of this world?
 
2021-03-02 4:22:11 AM  

gopher321: Meh. We'll have evolved into beings of pure mind and energy by that point.

Or we'll have all died by cholesterol from the pork rinds and pizza shovelled down our throats. Either/or.


That's really morbid and defeatist.

Beings of pure mind and energy can't enjoy pork rinds and pizza. Who wants to live like that?
 
Displayed 22 of 22 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.