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(The New York Times)   Here's how important it is to open windows in classrooms to reduce the risk of COVID-19 spread when we get the kiddies back to school   (nytimes.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, High school, School, points of data, Harvard University, Classroom, Augmented reality, Three-dimensional space, Simulation  
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488 clicks; posted to STEM » on 01 Mar 2021 at 10:47 AM (9 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-03-01 11:02:48 AM  
5 votes:
Okay first off while i cannot say what classroom were set up like before the pandemic struck , none of the classrooms i sat in as a kid looked anything like the example.  It was always a neat grid of desks rather than cluster like what is shown.

Now on opening a window, where i am in Minnesota and i would would assume in other places similarly situated on the map opening a window for improve ventilation is not really a viable option as it it remain too cold yet. currently where i live it is a balmy 0 degrees Fahrenheit and forecast to reach 16 degrees.   No one opens a window for longer than a few moments in such temps here.
 
2021-03-01 12:06:06 PM  
4 votes:
what schools still have operable windows?
 
2021-03-01 1:03:01 PM  
3 votes:
I've taught in classrooms in both Texas and California, and I can tell you that anything built after 1980 or so does not have operable windows. It's both enforced climate control and population control. School architecture, especially in Texas, bears a striking resemblance to prison architecture. Southern California, which has a far more livable climate than south Texas, still doesn't allow windows which open in new buildings.

Also, the idea of opening schools for face-to-face teaching and still keep students a minimum of six feet away is frankly laughable. I did a quick back-of-the-envelope estimating of my last classroom, which was 20' x 44', and even leaving no room for my desk, supply cabinets, station tables, drying racks, and sink, the only class I could fit everyone in was my 5th period, which had 18 students. The remainder of my classes, one of which had 31 students, would have required that I have half the students sit on the floor while I stapled the other half to the ceiling. Also, I would have to have learned how to levitate.
 
2021-03-01 9:41:22 AM  
3 votes:
I've read enough from teachers to know that most schools are older and haven't been updated in decades. If the Government had bothered to do that, with this in mind, they might have a good argument. But they don't. What do you call it when the Government forces people in a pandemic to crowd together?

Social murder.
 
2021-03-01 10:40:41 PM  
2 votes:

Calamity Gin: I've taught in classrooms in both Texas and California, and I can tell you that anything built after 1980 or so does not have operable windows. It's both enforced climate control and population control. School architecture, especially in Texas, bears a striking resemblance to prison architecture. Southern California, which has a far more livable climate than south Texas, still doesn't allow windows which open in new buildings.

Also, the idea of opening schools for face-to-face teaching and still keep students a minimum of six feet away is frankly laughable. I did a quick back-of-the-envelope estimating of my last classroom, which was 20' x 44', and even leaving no room for my desk, supply cabinets, station tables, drying racks, and sink, the only class I could fit everyone in was my 5th period, which had 18 students. The remainder of my classes, one of which had 31 students, would have required that I have half the students sit on the floor while I stapled the other half to the ceiling. Also, I would have to have learned how to levitate.


My biggest surprise and disappointment throughout the pandemic is that nobody's created a simple website or app to calculate room ccupancy per covid guidelines rather than fire code. The app could use AR to measure everything  (based on doorframe heights). Even a simple rectangle that places everyone's 6ft radius away from each other but not walls would be useful
 
2021-03-01 5:23:54 PM  
2 votes:

AgentKGB: grimlock1972: Okay first off while i cannot say what classroom were set up like before the pandemic struck , none of the classrooms i sat in as a kid looked anything like the example.  It was always a neat grid of desks rather than cluster like what is shown.

That and 30 kids in a classroom instead of the nine in the picture lol.

Now on opening a window, where i am in Minnesota and i would would assume in other places similarly situated on the map opening a window for improve ventilation is not really a viable option as it it remain too cold yet. currently where i live it is a balmy 0 degrees Fahrenheit and forecast to reach 16 degrees.   No one opens a window for longer than a few moments in such temps here.

As someone born and raised in Saskatchewan, yup. I mean... May/June sure you could open the window here and there. September, part of October... but the rest of the year? Hell no.


They did during the last pandemic.  There are photos of schoolkids going to school in like Switzerland or something, basically in a 3 walled room. They had a heater at the back and bundled the kids up.
 
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