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(CNN)   We've seen stories of rural Japanese houses going cheap. An American couple found something special   (edition.cnn.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Japan, House, Permanent residency, large country house, Real estate, 130-year-old home, Japanese architecture, free houses  
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2531 clicks; posted to Business » on 28 Feb 2021 at 6:12 PM (9 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-02-28 10:08:56 PM  
2 votes:

UncleDirtNap: trialpha: 2fardownthread: Land is so expensive that the home cost is trivial.

I find it amusing that this keeps coming up, given how absurd housing is in other countries. Last I heard, you can apparently still buy a house (or, more accurately land + cost of building a new house) in the suburbs of Tokyo for the equivalent of $500k. Now, it won't be a particularly big house by non-Japanese standards, but still perfectly suitable. You'll also get the benefit of a functional mass transit system, so being out in the suburbs won't be much of an issue.

Well you have to add in the cost of the kaiju insurance if you're building in the city.


It is true. The Kaiju rates are really high near port areas, near the Ginza, and near the Diet buildings. If you read the fine print, you find that life insurance does NOT cover acts of war, and for property insurance, Kaiju are usually written out. You have to buy special insurance in Akihabara.

Himeji castle had to be entirely rebuilt in 1601 and in 2015 after Kaiju attacks. They rebuilt it using funds from James Bond movies and royalties from CIvilization V and reruns from The Shogun series.
 
2021-02-28 9:48:37 PM  
2 votes:

trialpha: 2fardownthread: Land is so expensive that the home cost is trivial.

I find it amusing that this keeps coming up, given how absurd housing is in other countries. Last I heard, you can apparently still buy a house (or, more accurately land + cost of building a new house) in the suburbs of Tokyo for the equivalent of $500k. Now, it won't be a particularly big house by non-Japanese standards, but still perfectly suitable. You'll also get the benefit of a functional mass transit system, so being out in the suburbs won't be much of an issue.


Well you have to add in the cost of the kaiju insurance if you're building in the city.
 
2021-02-28 6:38:27 PM  
2 votes:
If it didn't come with a bamboo deer scare, can it really be a Japanese house?

/Donk
/Donk
/Donk
 
2021-02-28 8:00:17 PM  
1 vote:

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: mrmopar5287: MurphyMurphy: They explain.

"If we had children, a kominka would not be an option," says Kimberly.

I'm not clear on that part of the explanation other than children would break things, like the paper doors.

I mean, literally millions of Japanese people had children in homes of this style.

When they get freaky in the bedroom, the kids will hear daddy shoutout his safe word.


Ah, gotcha. It's the typical American prudish attitude about sex. That makes sense.
 
2021-02-28 7:19:22 PM  
1 vote:
Yes. I think I remember when this article came out.

You will find this in the "craziest foods I ever ate" thread, too, but here is the deal. People have been living in Japan for thousands of years now. Modern Japanese people are pretty much just like you and me. So articles about some white people going somewhere and "discovering" things are cute and everything, but ... oh forget it.

Where I am right now, it is below freezing. Japanese architecture was mostly wood pegs and grooved fittings, with a hard frame exposed to the elements and an inner paper and matchstick inner frame "living area." And that living area would be a bedroom, dining room, living room. You had a HIBACHI in the middle, and ventilation from the drafts was more than sufficient to keep you from asphyxiation. You slept on the mats near the hibachi. It worked. It was simple, but pretty efficient.

And that is great to think about in the summer time as you relax in rural Japan and wonder why anyone needs air conditioning.

So you see foreigners come to Japan and move into a structure built a century ago. They knock out the false ceilings, "open up" the place by getting rid of non-bearing walls and adopting an "open plan." They destroy the outbuildings and cut down the trees to the north and west to give a nice open feel to the outside and let in more light in late afternoon.

So winter comes, and the winds come howling in from Siberia, to the northwest, naturally. The walls are not insulated and will not hold heat. The ceiling is actually the roof, which is thatched and porous, OR it is ceramic and heat conducting. You MIGHT have a wood stove, but you have no place to keep the wood or a chainsaw because you destroyed the outbuildings. So you burn about 10 liters of kerosene a day trying to keep from freezing.

That will cost you 400 bucks a month.

But because you liked that natural wood look, you will also need a bout a kilowatt of lighting for your shack. The walls just suck the light in like a black hole. If you like Japanese baths, then you can heat about 25 gallons of water to about 40C and keep it there. If you insulate it, you will get mold.  Your toilet will be in a separate room, so keeping it unfrozen will take mon, hon.

So all that great rural living turns into a nightmare. Hipsters beware. History shows again and again how nature points out the folly of man.

Yes. There ARE WAYS to avoid all the pitfalls, but you will have to ask the old locals how to do it. And who has time for that?
 
2021-02-28 6:40:55 PM  
1 vote:
Such a deal? It's probably haunted by that Ring chick.
 
2021-02-28 2:23:49 PM  
1 vote:
What a beautiful home.
 
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