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(NASA)   Curiosity Mars rover: Look at me. I'm still here. For the love of God, don't forget me. I just took some photos of Martian clouds   (mars.nasa.gov) divider line
    More: Cool, Mars Exploration Rover, Right Navigation Camera, NASA's Mars rover Curiosity, image, NASA, Rover, Mars, Jet Propulsion Laboratory  
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1698 clicks; posted to STEM » on 28 Feb 2021 at 1:26 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



37 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-02-28 12:34:56 PM  
This has to be a record for overly successful egineering
 
2021-02-28 1:43:41 PM  
ghsponyexpress.comView Full Size
 
2021-02-28 1:58:36 PM  

thealgorerhythm: This has to be a record for overly successful egineering


i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2021-02-28 2:01:03 PM  
Curiosity is a very good rover.
 
2021-02-28 2:02:47 PM  
stop bringing your childish religion into everything
 
2021-02-28 2:38:10 PM  

LowbrowDeluxe: thealgorerhythm: This has to be a record for overly successful egineering

[i.pinimg.com image 850x523]


Doesnt count. The way a light bulb was made it will last until power goes out as long as you never stop the flow of power to it. Its the on and off that burns it out
 
2021-02-28 3:17:33 PM  

Stephen_Falken: stop bringing your childish religion into everything


Stop being judgmental. If I, a biologist who believes in BOTH Evolution and Intelligent Design, can rectify that belief by pragmatic viewpoint, then so can anyone realize that their internal philosophy may be damaging to others because of a differing view.

/Your War Is Not Here.
 
2021-02-28 3:17:40 PM  

lifeslammer: LowbrowDeluxe: thealgorerhythm: This has to be a record for overly successful egineering

[i.pinimg.com image 850x523]

Doesnt count. The way a light bulb was made it will last until power goes out as long as you never stop the flow of power to it. Its the on and off that burns it out


Not quite. It's easier on it to be left on and not have the heating and cooling cycles. But, when run at full power it still is going to burn away the filament. Those old bulbs use a different filament than modern ones which is why it's so long and wound up, but it would still be much brighter if at full power.

Like many things if run at a low power setting it'll last longer. A large part of why that bulb has lasted so long is that it's being run at very low power. If ramped up to full power it'd probably burn out within a week.
 
2021-02-28 3:20:38 PM  
Won't you come see about me
I'll be alone dancing, you know it baby
 
2021-02-28 3:27:02 PM  

thealgorerhythm: This has to be a record for overly successful egineering


There's a bell that's been ringing for a lifetime or more thanks to a dry stack of unknown composition.
 
2021-02-28 3:29:30 PM  
With much less atmosphere on Mars does that mean big clouds (like big puffy ones and grey thunderstorms) don't happen because they are too dense/heavy to float on the thin air?
 
2021-02-28 3:46:13 PM  

NBSV: lifeslammer: LowbrowDeluxe: thealgorerhythm: This has to be a record for overly successful egineering

[i.pinimg.com image 850x523]

Doesnt count. The way a light bulb was made it will last until power goes out as long as you never stop the flow of power to it. Its the on and off that burns it out

Not quite. It's easier on it to be left on and not have the heating and cooling cycles. But, when run at full power it still is going to burn away the filament. Those old bulbs use a different filament than modern ones which is why it's so long and wound up, but it would still be much brighter if at full power.

Like many things if run at a low power setting it'll last longer. A large part of why that bulb has lasted so long is that it's being run at very low power. If ramped up to full power it'd probably burn out within a week.



It also only gives off the equivalent of light of a 4-watt night light bulb, despite starting out as a 30-watt bulb.
 
2021-02-28 3:47:04 PM  
Ugh, so needy, I don't know how NASA puts up with it.
 
2021-02-28 3:57:03 PM  

HawkEyes: With much less atmosphere on Mars does that mean big clouds (like big puffy ones and grey thunderstorms) don't happen because they are too dense/heavy to float on the thin air?


I'm not a science guy but I'm pretty sure clouds on earth are water based(H2O) and the clouds on mars are carbon dioxide based(CO2).
 
2021-02-28 3:59:52 PM  
Great pic. You can see the ancient burial mounds right there.
 
2021-02-28 4:05:42 PM  

leeksfromchichis: thealgorerhythm: This has to be a record for overly successful egineering

There's a bell that's been ringing for a lifetime or more thanks to a dry stack of unknown composition.


The Clarendon Dry Pile/Oxford Bell. The dry pile is from 1840, but the bell may date to 1825. The clapper barely moves though.

Oxford Electric Bell - YouTube
 
2021-02-28 4:11:03 PM  

lifeslammer: LowbrowDeluxe: thealgorerhythm: This has to be a record for overly successful egineering

[i.pinimg.com image 850x523]

Doesnt count. The way a light bulb was made it will last until power goes out as long as you never stop the flow of power to it. Its the on and off that burns it out


Well that, and it was decided early on to design lightbulbs to burn out after a while.  The older, non-burn out lightbulbs do eventually fail, for other reasons, but having to buy and replace a lightbulb ever few years is a feature not a bug to the lightbulb makers.
 
2021-02-28 5:09:20 PM  

FarkingSmurf: HawkEyes: With much less atmosphere on Mars does that mean big clouds (like big puffy ones and grey thunderstorms) don't happen because they are too dense/heavy to float on the thin air?

I'm not a science guy but I'm pretty sure clouds on earth are water based(H2O) and the clouds on mars are carbon dioxide based(CO2).



Most martian clouds are water ice but a large portion are CO2.

The thin atmosphere is the main reason for lack of clouds.  Because the thinner atmosphere doesn't allow the support a lot of dust particles to be suspended long enough in the air for cloud formation.

Most clouds form very high in the atmosphere in the area where falling meteors burn up and become seed material for the clouds.
 
2021-02-28 5:30:50 PM  

thealgorerhythm: This has to be a record for overly successful egineering


Most space space probes seem to die quickly or lasts long past the "warrantee." My theory is that if you make it five times better than you think is utterly need to last the mission your mission will go on and on assuming they keep up the funding. Anything less and you are doomed as space is unforgiving -- just good enough is almost never good enough.

Though Opportunity still holds the record. That rover also got lucky as the winds occasionally cleaned its solar panels which is not something that was expected.
 
2021-02-28 5:31:04 PM  
GET THAT CAT OUTTA THE WAY!
Youtube HSsKa-SYn0Q
 
2021-02-28 6:23:48 PM  

Stephen_Falken: stop bringing your childish religion into everything


I've been an Atheist for most of my life but I still use God in expressions, mother nature too.
 
2021-02-28 6:30:37 PM  

talkertopc: Stephen_Falken: stop bringing your childish religion into everything

I've been an Atheist for most of my life but I still use God in expressions, mother nature too.


I have it on good authority that Curiosity worships the one true God:

upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size
 
2021-02-28 6:56:26 PM  

Stephen_Falken: stop bringing your childish religion into everything


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-02-28 7:19:22 PM  

Aardvark Inc.: Curiosity is a very good rover.


Can I get a Nominal!
 
2021-02-28 7:32:28 PM  
 
2021-02-28 7:42:59 PM  

thealgorerhythm: This has to be a record for overly successful egineering


Nope. Both Voyagers still work well enough to send signals back at regular intervals.

There's a fun story you can see one of the engineers tell on one of the recent PBS specials about how at the last minute before final transport to launch they bought the city out of aluminum foil because they realized they needed more shielding for some of the instruments.

That said - Curiosity is a very good rover. I hope someday we bring her back so she can live out eternity in a nice museum, instead of buried in the sand and dust on Mars.
 
2021-02-28 7:49:40 PM  
th.bing.comView Full Size

Shoulda licensed it out better

Big Bux in those there missions
 
2021-02-28 8:07:09 PM  
I never forgot you, little friend.
 
2021-02-28 8:08:31 PM  
think we got some folks mixing up "Opportunity" and "Curiosity"

"Opportunity" was the little rover that could, and got lucky with some wind storms cleaning off the solar panels, and not getting stuck in a bad spot for charging (pretty much what killed the sister rover, "Spirit")

"Curiosity" runs on a plutonium RTG .. it won't run out of juice for a while, yet

All are very good rovers, and every engineer involved deserves all the accolades that can be bestowed upon them. Whether it's building something that lasts for years beyond it's expected 90 day lifespan, or landing a car-sized rover using a rocket crane.
 
2021-02-28 8:27:19 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-02-28 9:11:47 PM  

thealgorerhythm: This has to be a record for overly successful egineering


Voyager 1, Voyager 2, and Pioneed 11 pointedly clear their throats.
 
2021-02-28 9:16:47 PM  

Daedalus27: [ghsponyexpress.com image 600x402]


imgs.xkcd.comView Full Size
 
2021-02-28 10:48:19 PM  

LowbrowDeluxe: thealgorerhythm: This has to be a record for overly successful egineering

[i.pinimg.com image 850x523]


It's in a fire station. Across from it is a basketball hoop. Many clenches were felt one day as the ball sailed toward the bulb. I don't recall if it brushed it or was a near miss but I think they moved the hoop pronto. From the live pic below they may also have raised the bulb.

It runs at half voltage and was moved from one station to another.

But yeah, it is still burning.

https://www.centennialbulb.org/
 
2021-02-28 10:52:54 PM  

Ecliptic: thealgorerhythm: This has to be a record for overly successful egineering

Nope. Both Voyagers still work well enough to send signals back at regular intervals.

There's a fun story you can see one of the engineers tell on one of the recent PBS specials about how at the last minute before final transport to launch they bought the city out of aluminum foil because they realized they needed more shielding for some of the instruments.

That said - Curiosity is a very good rover. I hope someday we bring her back so she can live out eternity in a nice museum, instead of buried in the sand and dust on Mars.


Heck. Pioneer One has them all beat. It is out of the solar system and we still get data from it. Granted most of the systems are shut down but it was launched in the 70s, IIRC.
 
2021-03-01 1:18:57 AM  

saturn badger: LowbrowDeluxe: thealgorerhythm: This has to be a record for overly successful egineering

[i.pinimg.com image 850x523]

It's in a fire station. Across from it is a basketball hoop. Many clenches were felt one day as the ball sailed toward the bulb. I don't recall if it brushed it or was a near miss but I think they moved the hoop pronto. From the live pic below they may also have raised the bulb.

It runs at half voltage and was moved from one station to another.

But yeah, it is still burning.

https://www.centennialbulb.org/


It burned for quite some time until some asshole with a mortal killed it
 
2021-03-01 10:59:47 AM  

Jedekai: Stephen_Falken: stop bringing your childish religion into everything

Stop being judgmental. If I, a biologist who believes in BOTH Evolution and Intelligent Design, can rectify that belief by pragmatic viewpoint, then so can anyone realize that their internal philosophy may be damaging to others because of a differing view.

/Your War Is Not Here.


I don't care whatever else you believe, if you believe Intelligent Design is a real thing, then you are not a smart person.
 
2021-03-01 7:38:30 PM  

FarkingSmurf: HawkEyes: With much less atmosphere on Mars does that mean big clouds (like big puffy ones and grey thunderstorms) don't happen because they are too dense/heavy to float on the thin air?

I'm not a science guy but I'm pretty sure clouds on earth are water based(H2O) and the clouds on mars are carbon dioxide based(CO2).


You most certainly proved that you're not a science guy.

/-2 pts.
 
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