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(WFAA Fort Worth)   Texas to CA companies for the last decade: Move here, we're a rootin' tootin' free wheeling unregulated wild west business mecca. Think of all the profits you'll make. Texas this week: Please stay. We'll try to keep the lights on. We promise   (wfaa.com) divider line
    More: Fail, Power outage, Vice President of the United States, Texas city, state manufacturing client tour, Colin Grover, United States, catastrophic failure, vice president of Private Client Services  
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1056 clicks; posted to Business » on 27 Feb 2021 at 4:46 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-02-27 5:05:39 PM  
#1 priority for the Texas legislature this session is a law forcing Mark Cuban to play the national anthem before Mavericks games.

Electric grid?  Nah...nothing gonna happen because it worked as planned.

In the words of Jerry Jones - the crisis was like I hit the lottery!
 
2021-02-27 5:11:37 PM  
By contrast, traditional office users such as corporate headquarters or software engineering operations will not take the widespread outages into as much consideration, White said.


Software engineering doesn't require electricity? Damn, all this time I've been doing it wrong.

(Business does not like instability. Talking about succession, failing to keep the lights on, Ted Cruz - all big signs of instability.)
 
2021-02-27 5:21:09 PM  

homeless_need_help: By contrast, traditional office users such as corporate headquarters or software engineering operations will not take the widespread outages into as much consideration, White said.


Software engineering doesn't require electricity? Damn, all this time I've been doing it wrong.

(Business does not like instability. Talking about succession, failing to keep the lights on, Ted Cruz - all big signs of instability.)


The TV show?

BTW, it's secession.
 
2021-02-27 5:36:42 PM  
Dallas' small-town bedwetting never, ever fails to be funny.

It's OK guys. Just build another mall. Then no one can deny how cool y'all are.
 
2021-02-27 5:37:38 PM  

mcreadyblue: #1 priority for the Texas legislature this session is a law forcing Mark Cuban to play the national anthem before Mavericks games.

Electric grid?  Nah...nothing gonna happen because it worked as planned.

In the words of Jerry Jones - the crisis was like I hit the lottery!


All Republicans have is made-up culture war bullshiat. When that's all you have you lead with it
 
2021-02-27 5:38:26 PM  

ZMugg: homeless_need_help: By contrast, traditional office users such as corporate headquarters or software engineering operations will not take the widespread outages into as much consideration, White said.


Software engineering doesn't require electricity? Damn, all this time I've been doing it wrong.

(Business does not like instability. Talking about succession, failing to keep the lights on, Ted Cruz - all big signs of instability.)

The TV show?

BTW, it's secession.


Challenging the legitimacy if the presidential election is interference in succession; though I recognize that's not your meaning in this context, I'm not certain it's not theirs.
 
2021-02-27 6:07:03 PM  

homeless_need_help: By contrast, traditional office users such as corporate headquarters or software engineering operations will not take the widespread outages into as much consideration, White said.


Software engineering doesn't require electricity? Damn, all this time I've been doing it wrong.

(Business does not like instability. Talking about succession, failing to keep the lights on, Ted Cruz - all big signs of instability.)


Also, I assume software engineers aren't huge fans of being in danger of freezing to death so the electricity company can make a little extra money.
 
2021-02-27 6:08:28 PM  
It will be interesting to see if Musk still moves his factory. The plan is supposedly on hold now.
 
2021-02-27 6:13:37 PM  
Oh, that's cute.

Are we still pretending that CA doesn't have rolling blackouts to prevent the place from bursting into flames?
 
2021-02-27 6:15:13 PM  

gar1013: Oh, that's cute.

Are we still pretending that CA doesn't have rolling blackouts to prevent the place from bursting into flames?


Oh hush you, there is narrative to be played up here.
 
2021-02-27 6:33:01 PM  

ZMugg: homeless_need_help: By contrast, traditional office users such as corporate headquarters or software engineering operations will not take the widespread outages into as much consideration, White said.


Software engineering doesn't require electricity? Damn, all this time I've been doing it wrong.

(Business does not like instability. Talking about succession, failing to keep the lights on, Ted Cruz - all big signs of instability.)

The TV show?

BTW, it's secession.


Texas? Call it SUCKsession.
 
2021-02-27 6:33:13 PM  

gar1013: Oh, that's cute.

Are we still pretending that CA doesn't have rolling blackouts to prevent the place from bursting into flames?


They roll for 2-6 hours at a time, not 2-6 days at a time.
 
2021-02-27 6:34:06 PM  
Honestly, the businesses care more about power and money. They're still gonna move to Texas, because Texas has signalled that the businesses get power and the workers do not.

There is a minimum level they require, but really? They don't care if society falls apart around them as long as they have power and money.
 
2021-02-27 6:50:37 PM  

dericwater: gar1013: Oh, that's cute.

Are we still pretending that CA doesn't have rolling blackouts to prevent the place from bursting into flames?

They roll for 2-6 hours at a time, not 2-6 days at a time.


Correct. A very very big difference. But it's cute that when you have nothing, you gotta grasp at straws.
 
2021-02-27 6:58:20 PM  

adamatari: Honestly, the businesses care more about power and money. They're still gonna move to Texas, because Texas has signalled that the businesses get power and the workers do not.

There is a minimum level they require, but really? They don't care if society falls apart around them as long as they have power and money.


My office was out for 3 days.

Who knew you can't start a diesel backup generator when it's 0F?  🤷🏻♂
 
2021-02-27 7:09:59 PM  

gar1013: Oh, that's cute.

Are we still pretending that CA doesn't have rolling blackouts to prevent the place from bursting into flames?


The Bay Area had rolling blackouts that brought the bio-tech and tech industries to a complete standstill for two weeks?
/news to me
//lives here and works in tech
///used to work in bio-tech
 
2021-02-27 7:42:54 PM  
Texas: All Hat No Cattle
 
2021-02-27 8:44:45 PM  

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: Who knew you can't start a diesel backup generator when it's 0F?


Uh, you can. What's stopping them?
 
2021-02-27 8:57:30 PM  

mrmopar5287: TedCruz'sCrazyDad: Who knew you can't start a diesel backup generator when it's 0F?

Uh, you can. What's stopping them?


Diesel fuel turns into gel when it freezes.  The only way to prevent is is to add fuel treatment well ahead of time or else ensure the storage tank has a warmer.

Again, something that's second nature in areas which experience such cold weather on a regular basis.
 
2021-02-27 8:57:32 PM  

mrmopar5287: TedCruz'sCrazyDad: Who knew you can't start a diesel backup generator when it's 0F?

Uh, you can. What's stopping them?


Frozen fuel?

Most diesel fuels freeze at common winter temperatures, while the temperatures greatly vary.[58] Petrodiesel typically freezes around temperatures of −8.1 °C (17.5 °F), whereas biodiesel freezes between temperatures of 2° to 15 °C (35° to 60 °F).[58] The viscosity of diesel noticeably increases as the temperature decreases, changing it into a gel at temperatures of −19 °C (−2.2 °F) to −15 °C (5 °F), that cannot flow in fuel systems.
 
2021-02-27 9:15:29 PM  
"There will be those who think, 'If it can happen once, it could happen again,'"

It already happened once, in 2011.

This was the 'happened again'
 
2021-02-27 9:17:51 PM  

Chief Superintendent Lookout: Diesel fuel turns into gel when it freezes.  The only way to prevent is is to add fuel treatment well ahead of time or else ensure the storage tank has a warmer.


Or use winter diesel fuel. I own and drive a Diesel car. It's never been a problem for me. At -22ºF it starts and runs fine. I know Texas got cold, but not that cold.
 
2021-02-27 9:35:22 PM  

Chief Superintendent Lookout: add fuel treatment well ahead of time


And I'm not understanding why they didn't do this.

Chief Superintendent Lookout: ensure the storage tank has a warmer


You only really need a fuel filter heater like my car is equipped with. The engine can be started with fuel that might be colder than the cloud point, and the filter heater on my car turns on anytime the fuel is cooler than 60ºF. The fuel is heated and flows through the filter so the wax particles don't clog it. When the fuel is pumped forward to the fuel rail and the injectors, the heat from the engine keeps it liquid without any trouble. Then, excess fuel is used to cool the injectors and goes through the spill return system to the fuel tank, ensuring that the fuel in the tank remains liquid and can be pumped forward to the fuel filter where the heater is running. Lather, rinse, repeat.
 
2021-02-27 9:37:42 PM  

mrmopar5287: Chief Superintendent Lookout: Diesel fuel turns into gel when it freezes.  The only way to prevent is is to add fuel treatment well ahead of time or else ensure the storage tank has a warmer.

Or use winter diesel fuel. I own and drive a Diesel car. It's never been a problem for me. At -22ºF it starts and runs fine. I know Texas got cold, but not that cold.


Given that their power grid failed due to lack of preparedness, how likely is it that they'd have diesel blends on hand that don't gel at that temperature?
 
2021-02-27 9:39:08 PM  

mrmopar5287: Chief Superintendent Lookout: add fuel treatment well ahead of time

And I'm not understanding why they didn't do this.

Chief Superintendent Lookout: ensure the storage tank has a warmer

You only really need a fuel filter heater like my car is equipped with. The engine can be started with fuel that might be colder than the cloud point, and the filter heater on my car turns on anytime the fuel is cooler than 60ºF. The fuel is heated and flows through the filter so the wax particles don't clog it. When the fuel is pumped forward to the fuel rail and the injectors, the heat from the engine keeps it liquid without any trouble. Then, excess fuel is used to cool the injectors and goes through the spill return system to the fuel tank, ensuring that the fuel in the tank remains liquid and can be pumped forward to the fuel filter where the heater is running. Lather, rinse, repeat.


But you're talking about cars instead of generators. Do diesel generators typically have features to prevent the fuel gelling?
 
2021-02-27 9:55:04 PM  
Nobody with any f**king brains bought into that shiat to begin with.
Anybody who leaves California and goes to Texas expecting a better life is an evil moron who life is going to ass-f**k to a bloody death.
Imagine literally being that sorry and wretched of a loser.
You're in California and look over and see Texas and think "Oboy, I wants me summa that!"
I can't really conceive of the inside of such a subhuman head.
 
2021-02-27 9:58:20 PM  

iron de havilland: Do diesel generators typically have features to prevent the fuel gelling?


Absolutely, yes. I mean, they can and should be equipped with such features. That's literally the point of having a backup generator that will start during inclement weather.

A guy I know does electrical work that includes at a local nuclear power plant. Their diesel backup generators are large (have to be a few MW to run emergency coolant pumps and other things in the plant) and to have a generator able to start and provide full power within about 30 seconds they have to be kept on warm standby. That means heated to where the engines won't be damaged by going from cold start to full throttle operation that quickly. The fuel is kept at temperatures where it won't gel, the engine oil has a heater to keep it warm so it will circulate and lubricate immediately, and the engine coolant also has a heater to keep the engine block and heads warm so it can start and go to full power output within seconds of an emergency.

This would be overkill for a smaller diesel generator, but you still prepare for such a thing. You make sure the fuel is good, has a low enough gel point for expected weather, and you make sure the engine has a heated fuel filter so that it can start and run in cold weather.
 
2021-02-27 10:04:46 PM  

mrmopar5287: iron de havilland: Do diesel generators typically have features to prevent the fuel gelling?

Absolutely, yes. I mean, they can and should be equipped with such features. That's literally the point of having a backup generator that will start during inclement weather.

A guy I know does electrical work that includes at a local nuclear power plant. Their diesel backup generators are large (have to be a few MW to run emergency coolant pumps and other things in the plant) and to have a generator able to start and provide full power within about 30 seconds they have to be kept on warm standby. That means heated to where the engines won't be damaged by going from cold start to full throttle operation that quickly. The fuel is kept at temperatures where it won't gel, the engine oil has a heater to keep it warm so it will circulate and lubricate immediately, and the engine coolant also has a heater to keep the engine block and heads warm so it can start and go to full power output within seconds of an emergency.

This would be overkill for a smaller diesel generator, but you still prepare for such a thing. You make sure the fuel is good, has a low enough gel point for expected weather, and you make sure the engine has a heated fuel filter so that it can start and run in cold weather.


Sure, but given that power plants' frozen controls forced shutdowns in Texas, how likely is it that an average Texan will have a diesel generator prepared for such an eventuality?
 
2021-02-27 10:05:46 PM  

iron de havilland: how likely is it that they'd have diesel blends on hand that don't gel at that temperature?


There are winter additives to use: https://powerservice.com/psp_pro​duct/d​iesel-fuel-supplement-cetane-boost/

BONUS: Power Service is a company headquartered in Texas. That company makes products for cold weather operation of diesel engines and is in Texas, where they needed the products the most.

Your question is really one that I was interested in. I wondered how diesel-powered vehicles in Texas handled the cold weather with their fuel blends available. I posted such a question to the car website that I'm a member of and I haven't got any replies, so maybe there aren't many people who own the same car as me and live in Texas.
 
2021-02-27 10:10:29 PM  

iron de havilland: how likely is it that an average Texan will have a diesel generator prepared for such an eventuality?


If you own a diesel generator, it should be prepared for cold weather starts. That's ownership 101 of a diesel generator. If no one prepared for this, I have no sympathy.
 
2021-02-27 10:13:09 PM  

mrmopar5287: iron de havilland: how likely is it that they'd have diesel blends on hand that don't gel at that temperature?

There are winter additives to use: https://powerservice.com/psp_prod​uct/diesel-fuel-supplement-cetane-boos​t/

BONUS: Power Service is a company headquartered in Texas. That company makes products for cold weather operation of diesel engines and is in Texas, where they needed the products the most.

Your question is really one that I was interested in. I wondered how diesel-powered vehicles in Texas handled the cold weather with their fuel blends available. I posted such a question to the car website that I'm a member of and I haven't got any replies, so maybe there aren't many people who own the same car as me and live in Texas.


I actually found something I found quite interesting on the wiki page for diesel gelling. BMW used to recommend using a 30:70 petrol:diesel mix to handle cold temperatures.

I think modern diesel injection systems are less tolerant of random fuel mixtures than they used to be. I had a diesel VW Polo that even had in the owner's manual that it could run on a 50:50 mix of vegetable oil and diesel. And I did give it a drink of veg oil a couple of times, with no issues.

/But putting veg oil in your fuel is just going to make things worse in properly cold places.
 
2021-02-27 10:16:09 PM  

mrmopar5287: iron de havilland: how likely is it that an average Texan will have a diesel generator prepared for such an eventuality?

If you own a diesel generator, it should be prepared for cold weather starts. That's ownership 101 of a diesel generator. If no one prepared for this, I have no sympathy.


Absolutely, but if the company responsible for the electricity grid had prepared properly, no one would have needed a generator.
 
2021-02-27 10:20:24 PM  

iron de havilland: I actually found something I found quite interesting on the wiki page for diesel gelling. BMW used to recommend using a 30:70 petrol:diesel mix to handle cold temperatures.


Older indirect injection engines didn't have a problem with that. The fuel injection pumps were relatively low pressure (maybe 2,000-3,000 psi) and the pumps were often lubricated with engine oil in a separate circuit. The Cummins engines in older Dodge pickups could run kerosene or jet fuel without a problem because the pump was lubricated with engine oil.

Modern direct injection engines will not tolerate anything other than diesel fuel. The high pressure fuel pumps use the diesel fuel itself for lubrication and gasoline will not do a good enough job. It will destroy the fuel pump in a short amount of time. The HPFP in my car runs at about 30,000 psi for injection pressure.
 
2021-02-27 10:21:54 PM  

jso2897: Nobody with any f**king brains bought into that shiat to begin with.
Anybody who leaves California and goes to Texas expecting a better life is an evil moron who life is going to ass-f**k to a bloody death.
Imagine literally being that sorry and wretched of a loser.
You're in California and look over and see Texas and think "Oboy, I wants me summa that!"
I can't really conceive of the inside of such a subhuman head.


Rent is a hell of a lot less. I have a house in the third ward part of Houston (most people would call it a ghetto, but in reality it is in a rich black neighborhood, Shelia Jackson Lee actually is less than 200 yards from my house). Anyways I recently moved out and rather than immediately selling it decided to rent it out to some acquaintances that moved from the Bay area (they are employed by a video game company) who were able to transfer to Houston. I am charging them 1200 a month (I break even with maintenance costs, insurance, taxes, mortgage, etc.) for a 2,000 square foot property with 9,000 square feet of land (also has original oak hardwood flooring, complete brick façade, etc.). It is in the city and, if so desired, is <10 minute walk through a very nice park to a light rail line that can get you downtown. It is less than a five mile bike ride to the med center on the bayou trails. This couple was paying twice that for an apartment less than half that size in the bay area. There is something to be said for affordable urban living. Still get the multicultural experience of any major urban area but can actually afford a house. If they end up liking the property I would sell them it for 330k as well (according to zillow it is worth 360, but that would be fair if I didn't have to pay realtors fees).

If they don't want to buy it, I am holding onto the property for a few years until the new U of H medical school is built after which it probably will increase significantly in value.
 
2021-02-27 10:24:33 PM  

The_Homeless_Guy: Shelia Jackson Lee actually is less than 200 yards from my house


Condolences.
 
2021-02-27 10:26:29 PM  

homeless_need_help: By contrast, traditional office users such as corporate headquarters or software engineering operations will not take the widespread outages into as much consideration, White said.


Software engineering doesn't require electricity? Damn, all this time I've been doing it wrong.

(Business does not like instability. Talking about succession, failing to keep the lights on, Ted Cruz - all big signs of instability.)



To run a company, you need talent, and the best talent will always prefer living in California over Texas.
 
2021-02-27 10:28:39 PM  

mrmopar5287: The_Homeless_Guy: Shelia Jackson Lee actually is less than 200 yards from my house

Condolences.


While I am a democratic, I am not a complete fan (her husband who works at U of H is pretty cool though, I actually have had several beers with Dr. Lee), however, my house barely lost power (maybe 12 hours total) so there are advantages to being on the same microgrid. Just saying, while most people would call the area the hood, it is far from it.
 
2021-02-27 10:35:40 PM  

dericwater: gar1013: Oh, that's cute.

Are we still pretending that CA doesn't have rolling blackouts to prevent the place from bursting into flames?

They roll for 2-6 hours at a time, not 2-6 days at a time.


If you add them up, I promise you it'll total more than Texas.

You don't seem to understand that the frequency of the event matters. California is like living in a third world country CONSTANTLY when it comes to the electrical grid.
 
2021-02-27 10:36:04 PM  

FarkingChas: dericwater: gar1013: Oh, that's cute.

Are we still pretending that CA doesn't have rolling blackouts to prevent the place from bursting into flames?

They roll for 2-6 hours at a time, not 2-6 days at a time.

Correct. A very very big difference. But it's cute that when you have nothing, you gotta grasp at straws.


Yes, he is grasping.
 
2021-02-27 10:39:23 PM  

mcmnky: "There will be those who think, 'If it can happen once, it could happen again,'"

It already happened once, in 2011.

This was the 'happened again'


So if you take the extreme end of 6 days of outage, that is 144 hours, or 14.4 hours per year.

Parts of CA can easily hit that amount of outage in a month, except that the outages will occur in the middle of the day and often when it is hot.
 
2021-02-27 10:39:38 PM  

sprgrss: gar1013: Oh, that's cute.

Are we still pretending that CA doesn't have rolling blackouts to prevent the place from bursting into flames?

Oh hush you, there is narrative to be played up here.


At least the water pipes don't burst.
 
2021-02-27 10:45:21 PM  

Bonzo_1116: sprgrss: gar1013: Oh, that's cute.

Are we still pretending that CA doesn't have rolling blackouts to prevent the place from bursting into flames?

Oh hush you, there is narrative to be played up here.

At least the water pipes don't burst.


That is more in how they build the houses. Here is how my waterline works:.

1. Mainline comes off of the street and then exits the ground outside the front of my house. Here there is a spigot as well as the main water shut off (this is all external, I throw blankets over it whenever there is going to be freezing weather)

2. Cold water then goes to all the faucets in the crawlspace

3. The cold water line actually goes under my backyard and exits next to the detached garage. This is where the water heater is. It actually enters the detached garage externally (though the garage isn't heated so I guess it doesn't really matter). The hot water then leaves the garage and goes underground back to the crawlspace/house.


It is very lucky my pipes didn't freeze. However I am luckier than the poor souls who had their pipes done through the attics/ceilings. This is very common in the area as most houses in houston are built on slabs and they are often too lazy to do the supply plumbing prior to pouring the slab and thus place the supply plumbing in the attic (I hate slabs, especially with older homes and specifically bought a pier and beam house).
 
2021-02-27 10:48:21 PM  

gar1013: mcmnky: "There will be those who think, 'If it can happen once, it could happen again,'"

It already happened once, in 2011.

This was the 'happened again'

So if you take the extreme end of 6 days of outage, that is 144 hours, or 14.4 hours per year.

Parts of CA can easily hit that amount of outage in a month, except that the outages will occur in the middle of the day and often when it is hot.


How do the death rates compare?

And why do things like this happen in first world countries?
 
2021-02-27 10:48:26 PM  

mrmopar5287: iron de havilland: Do diesel generators typically have features to prevent the fuel gelling?

Absolutely, yes. I mean, they can and should be equipped with such features. That's literally the point of having a backup generator that will start during inclement weather.

A guy I know does electrical work that includes at a local nuclear power plant. Their diesel backup generators are large (have to be a few MW to run emergency coolant pumps and other things in the plant) and to have a generator able to start and provide full power within about 30 seconds they have to be kept on warm standby. That means heated to where the engines won't be damaged by going from cold start to full throttle operation that quickly. The fuel is kept at temperatures where it won't gel, the engine oil has a heater to keep it warm so it will circulate and lubricate immediately, and the engine coolant also has a heater to keep the engine block and heads warm so it can start and go to full power output within seconds of an emergency.

This would be overkill for a smaller diesel generator, but you still prepare for such a thing. You make sure the fuel is good, has a low enough gel point for expected weather, and you make sure the engine has a heated fuel filter so that it can start and run in cold weather.


You're prepared for your next earthquake, right?  All your bookcases are strapped to the wall at a stud, all your shelving has rails, and you know where your interior safe point is as well as your family rally spot outside?

Of course you're ready!  You plan ahead.
 
2021-02-27 10:53:25 PM  

The_Homeless_Guy: Bonzo_1116: sprgrss: gar1013: Oh, that's cute.

Are we still pretending that CA doesn't have rolling blackouts to prevent the place from bursting into flames?

Oh hush you, there is narrative to be played up here.

At least the water pipes don't burst.

That is more in how they build the houses. Here is how my waterline works:.

1. Mainline comes off of the street and then exits the ground outside the front of my house. Here there is a spigot as well as the main water shut off (this is all external, I throw blankets over it whenever there is going to be freezing weather)

2. Cold water then goes to all the faucets in the crawlspace

3. The cold water line actually goes under my backyard and exits next to the detached garage. This is where the water heater is. It actually enters the detached garage externally (though the garage isn't heated so I guess it doesn't really matter). The hot water then leaves the garage and goes underground back to the crawlspace/house.


It is very lucky my pipes didn't freeze. However I am luckier than the poor souls who had their pipes done through the attics/ceilings. This is very common in the area as most houses in houston are built on slabs and they are often too lazy to do the supply plumbing prior to pouring the slab and thus place the supply plumbing in the attic (I hate slabs, especially with older homes and specifically bought a pier and beam house).


My house used to have those sh*tty early 1980s flex-pipes in the ceiling.  That was a motherf*cker when the polymer finally gave out.  Water from the ceiling on the second floor.  Wet popcorn ceiling is an ugly way to find out, really.

It's got copper now, up from the slab into the walls, like it should.
 
2021-02-27 10:55:04 PM  

Bonzo_1116: your family rally spot


I live alone. My rally point is wherever I want it to be.
 
2021-02-27 10:56:13 PM  

gar1013: FarkingChas: dericwater: gar1013: Oh, that's cute.

Are we still pretending that CA doesn't have rolling blackouts to prevent the place from bursting into flames?

They roll for 2-6 hours at a time, not 2-6 days at a time.

Correct. A very very big difference. But it's cute that when you have nothing, you gotta grasp at straws.

Yes, he is grasping.


Maybe San Francisco is uniquely different, but I can't recall the last time we had to have a rolling blackout in the city or neighborhood. Sure, we have blackouts because our building's circuit tripped. But that's not due to insufficient energy sent to the whole city or region.
 
2021-02-27 11:09:55 PM  

Bonzo_1116: The_Homeless_Guy: Bonzo_1116: sprgrss: gar1013: Oh, that's cute.

Are we still pretending that CA doesn't have rolling blackouts to prevent the place from bursting into flames?

Oh hush you, there is narrative to be played up here.

At least the water pipes don't burst.

That is more in how they build the houses. Here is how my waterline works:.

1. Mainline comes off of the street and then exits the ground outside the front of my house. Here there is a spigot as well as the main water shut off (this is all external, I throw blankets over it whenever there is going to be freezing weather)

2. Cold water then goes to all the faucets in the crawlspace

3. The cold water line actually goes under my backyard and exits next to the detached garage. This is where the water heater is. It actually enters the detached garage externally (though the garage isn't heated so I guess it doesn't really matter). The hot water then leaves the garage and goes underground back to the crawlspace/house.


It is very lucky my pipes didn't freeze. However I am luckier than the poor souls who had their pipes done through the attics/ceilings. This is very common in the area as most houses in houston are built on slabs and they are often too lazy to do the supply plumbing prior to pouring the slab and thus place the supply plumbing in the attic (I hate slabs, especially with older homes and specifically bought a pier and beam house).

My house used to have those sh*tty early 1980s flex-pipes in the ceiling.  That was a motherf*cker when the polymer finally gave out.  Water from the ceiling on the second floor.  Wet popcorn ceiling is an ugly way to find out, really.

It's got copper now, up from the slab into the walls, like it should.


yes the building codes in Houston leave something to be desired. Whoever I am actually terrified of buying a house in the current county/state I live in as this is what our county's website claims:

"While West Virginia has a State Building Code there is no local enforcement of building code at this time. If the property is located within zoned areas of the county, use and siting requirements apply. The zoned areas of the county can be found on the county GIS page".

So basically if you live outside of a city in my county (which most people do) there is no code enforcement. Needless to say I bought a crappy run down farmhouse and intend to build my own place in the coming years. I don't trust anything built by a developer in my current region.
 
2021-02-27 11:11:59 PM  

gar1013: mcmnky: "There will be those who think, 'If it can happen once, it could happen again,'"

It already happened once, in 2011.

This was the 'happened again'

So if you take the extreme end of 6 days of outage, that is 144 hours, or 14.4 hours per year.

Parts of CA can easily hit that amount of outage in a month, except that the outages will occur in the middle of the day and often when it is hot.


parts vs all might ought to enter your analysis
 
2021-02-27 11:32:36 PM  

The_Homeless_Guy: Bonzo_1116: The_Homeless_Guy: Bonzo_1116: sprgrss: gar1013: Oh, that's cute.

Are we still pretending that CA doesn't have rolling blackouts to prevent the place from bursting into flames?

Oh hush you, there is narrative to be played up here.

At least the water pipes don't burst.

That is more in how they build the houses. Here is how my waterline works:.

1. Mainline comes off of the street and then exits the ground outside the front of my house. Here there is a spigot as well as the main water shut off (this is all external, I throw blankets over it whenever there is going to be freezing weather)

2. Cold water then goes to all the faucets in the crawlspace

3. The cold water line actually goes under my backyard and exits next to the detached garage. This is where the water heater is. It actually enters the detached garage externally (though the garage isn't heated so I guess it doesn't really matter). The hot water then leaves the garage and goes underground back to the crawlspace/house.


It is very lucky my pipes didn't freeze. However I am luckier than the poor souls who had their pipes done through the attics/ceilings. This is very common in the area as most houses in houston are built on slabs and they are often too lazy to do the supply plumbing prior to pouring the slab and thus place the supply plumbing in the attic (I hate slabs, especially with older homes and specifically bought a pier and beam house).

My house used to have those sh*tty early 1980s flex-pipes in the ceiling.  That was a motherf*cker when the polymer finally gave out.  Water from the ceiling on the second floor.  Wet popcorn ceiling is an ugly way to find out, really.

It's got copper now, up from the slab into the walls, like it should.

yes the building codes in Houston leave something to be desired. Whoever I am actually terrified of buying a house in the current county/state I live in as this is what our county's website claims:

"While West Virginia has a State Building Code the ...


Name does not check out....lol. It's very common down here for pipes to be run in the attic or around a slab, and that's because it's really hard to get the plumbers and concrete guys to coordinate. Old stuff is all pier and beam.,.. So, the plumbers find it easier to work around it, and this what you get.
 
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