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(Oxford University)   "Stuff", New Zealand's number one-ranking news and media site, left Facebook. Seven months later, traffic is just fine, and trust is higher   (reutersinstitute.politics.ox.ac.uk) divider line
    More: Interesting, Journalism, Mass media, CEO of Stuff, Facebook, Sinead Boucher, Stuff's CEO, last year, purchase of Stuff  
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324 clicks; posted to STEM » on 26 Feb 2021 at 1:32 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



9 Comments     (+0 »)
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2021-02-26 1:35:12 PM  
Ok, leaving facebook is nothing remotely similar to

"we figured out how to prevent people from sharing our shiat on FB because we have no idea how to make money"
 
2021-02-26 2:14:34 PM  
I wouldn't trust it....

media2.giphy.comView Full Size


Not after what happened to Chocolate Chip Charlie.
 
2021-02-26 2:23:25 PM  
Any 'news' on facebook is clickbait. If you want news, go to a news site directly.
 
2021-02-26 2:27:39 PM  
Four takeaways from the talk
1. Stuff cut advertising spending on Facebook before they removed its content, and there was no traffic impact at all.


Yup, add it to the growing pile of evidence that these online advertising companies are engaged in a massive scam enterprise.

Seems like every time a company actually gets the opportunity to check whether they're getting any value from them (either deliberately like in this case, or by finding out that their ads had been accidentally stopped and no one noticed) they figure out that it's all just a huge waste of money.
 
2021-02-26 2:32:38 PM  

Konlii: Four takeaways from the talk
1. Stuff cut advertising spending on Facebook before they removed its content, and there was no traffic impact at all.

Yup, add it to the growing pile of evidence that these online advertising companies are engaged in a massive scam enterprise.

Seems like every time a company actually gets the opportunity to check whether they're getting any value from them (either deliberately like in this case, or by finding out that their ads had been accidentally stopped and no one noticed) they figure out that it's all just a huge waste of money.


I'm on Facebook very rarely.

But even when I am, I completely scroll past any advertisements.  I *NEVER* look at them or click through them, even when they are for something I'm actually interested in.

In fact, I can't name a single thing I've purchased because of Internet advertising.  I mean, I buy stuff online, sure, but I actually go looking for it.  I don't see an ad and say "Hey, I want that!" then buy it.
 
2021-02-26 3:46:18 PM  
Yeah but New Zealanders are weird. They care about facts and stuff.
 
2021-02-26 3:46:19 PM  

dittybopper: Konlii: Four takeaways from the talk
1. Stuff cut advertising spending on Facebook before they removed its content, and there was no traffic impact at all.

Yup, add it to the growing pile of evidence that these online advertising companies are engaged in a massive scam enterprise.

Seems like every time a company actually gets the opportunity to check whether they're getting any value from them (either deliberately like in this case, or by finding out that their ads had been accidentally stopped and no one noticed) they figure out that it's all just a huge waste of money.

I'm on Facebook very rarely.

But even when I am, I completely scroll past any advertisements.  I *NEVER* look at them or click through them, even when they are for something I'm actually interested in.

In fact, I can't name a single thing I've purchased because of Internet advertising.  I mean, I buy stuff online, sure, but I actually go looking for it.  I don't see an ad and say "Hey, I want that!" then buy it.


The only time I ever clicked through an add was for Teeturtle. Found out they have some awesome stuff, and its going to be a good place to use for gifts to friends

But never bought anything from clicking on an ad
 
2021-02-26 4:33:38 PM  
I've been watching this from time to time on Stuff. It's excellent.
 
2021-02-26 4:38:40 PM  

lifeslammer: dittybopper: Konlii: Four takeaways from the talk
1. Stuff cut advertising spending on Facebook before they removed its content, and there was no traffic impact at all.

Yup, add it to the growing pile of evidence that these online advertising companies are engaged in a massive scam enterprise.

Seems like every time a company actually gets the opportunity to check whether they're getting any value from them (either deliberately like in this case, or by finding out that their ads had been accidentally stopped and no one noticed) they figure out that it's all just a huge waste of money.

I'm on Facebook very rarely.

But even when I am, I completely scroll past any advertisements.  I *NEVER* look at them or click through them, even when they are for something I'm actually interested in.

In fact, I can't name a single thing I've purchased because of Internet advertising.  I mean, I buy stuff online, sure, but I actually go looking for it.  I don't see an ad and say "Hey, I want that!" then buy it.

The only time I ever clicked through an add was for Teeturtle. Found out they have some awesome stuff, and its going to be a good place to use for gifts to friends

But never bought anything from clicking on an ad


There's a few farkers who have mentioned in the past that it seems to work for local business.

I would point out, it seems to be local businesses without any regional or national competition. They have used examples like a plumber.

And that's maybe more fair, because it isn't about consumer goods, it's a service. Likely one I would end up googling or using Maps to find locally, then check reviews and such.

With goods I'm wanting to purchase, there's almost no chance because I usually care about the product, not who sells it, or I can just buy it from an online retailer like Amazon or Newegg.

So, for small, niche businesses, especially services, I could see Facebook working over say a bus bench.

For large businesses and especially consumer products, I don't get how it could possibly work for them.
 
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