Skip to content
Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The Verge)   Another company successfully deploying Level 4 (no safety driver) autonomous cars, this in Las Vegas   (theverge.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Driverless car, Motional employee, autonomous vehicles, short list of companies, Hyundai-Aptiv joint venture, Motional spokesperson, extensive experience, Chinese tech firm Baidu  
•       •       •

560 clicks; posted to Business » on 23 Feb 2021 at 5:50 PM (11 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



23 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-02-23 5:06:44 PM  
In their defense, 90% of traffic in Vegas goes down the strip, turns around, and goes back up the other side. That's a relatively simple algorithm to write.
 
2021-02-23 6:03:12 PM  
Cool. When we actually have perfect level 2 software and infrastructure let me know
 
2021-02-23 6:09:14 PM  
Most of the people who cross the strip do so on the overpass walkways (or probably underground tunnels). Off the strip, it's eerily quiet. Well, at least it was when I was there about 4 years ago, and when I was last there before that, about a decade before that. There's little overlap of pedestrians and cars on Las Vegas city streets except at the pick-up/drop-off locations of the casinos, at least along the Strip.
 
2021-02-23 7:17:12 PM  
Let me know when they can drive at night in poor weather with mud obscuring all their sensors...............................​......................................​...........
 
2021-02-23 7:45:59 PM  

foo monkey: In their defense, 90% of traffic in Vegas goes down the strip, turns around, and goes back up the other side. That's a relatively simple algorithm to write.


It's still a crap shoot.
 
2021-02-23 7:50:52 PM  
They better beef up the drunk avoidance routines.
 
2021-02-23 9:53:38 PM  

dericwater: Most of the people who cross the strip do so on the overpass walkways (or probably underground tunnels). Off the strip, it's eerily quiet. Well, at least it was when I was there about 4 years ago, and when I was last there before that, about a decade before that. There's little overlap of pedestrians and cars on Las Vegas city streets except at the pick-up/drop-off locations of the casinos, at least along the Strip.


That's crossing the strip. There are dozens of spots (intersections and driveways) where cars and pedestrians meet.
 
2021-02-23 10:03:52 PM  

jtotheroc: Let me know when they can drive at night in poor weather with mud obscuring all their sensors...............................​......................................​...........


I don't get this argument at all. Worst case, the human can just take over. Why base your opinion of something on the super edge case?
 
2021-02-23 10:20:46 PM  

jtotheroc: Let me know when they can drive at night in poor weather with mud obscuring all their sensors...............................​......................................​...........


You're going to insist that driverless cars must be able to master the worst possible conditions before anyone considers adopting them in any conditions whatsoever? Let people test driverless cars in Phoenix and LA. The conditions are fairly constant and frankly, the only competition the driverless cars have to beat is average human drivers. And average human drivers are prone to drunkenness, distraction, being high, mental breaks, sleep deprivation, etc etc.
 
2021-02-23 10:44:51 PM  

jtotheroc: Let me know when they can drive at night in poor weather with mud obscuring all their sensors...............................​......................................​...........


Let me know when people can drive at night, in poor weather, with mud covering their windshield.
 
2021-02-23 11:34:58 PM  
Neat, should improve the driving here.  They will be obvious though as they will be the only ones following the speed limit and signaling.
 
2021-02-23 11:56:10 PM  

Likwit: jtotheroc: Let me know when they can drive at night in poor weather with mud obscuring all their sensors...............................​......................................​...........

I don't get this argument at all. Worst case, the human can just take over. Why base your opinion of something on the super edge case?


I drive a normal, low(ish) 2wd, RWD live axle sprung car in the Australian outback (on dirt).

Why do people prefer 4wd's?
 
2021-02-24 1:53:25 AM  

Marksrevenge: jtotheroc: Let me know when they can drive at night in poor weather with mud obscuring all their sensors...............................​......................................​...........

You're going to insist that driverless cars must be able to master the worst possible conditions before anyone considers adopting them in any conditions whatsoever? Let people test driverless cars in Phoenix and LA. The conditions are fairly constant and frankly, the only competition the driverless cars have to beat is average human drivers. And average human drivers are prone to drunkenness, distraction, being high, mental breaks, sleep deprivation, etc etc.


Yes.  Or are you saying that they will only drive in perfect conditions?  When conditions are not perfect they are going to do what?
 
2021-02-24 3:19:02 AM  

Boomstickz: Likwit: jtotheroc: Let me know when they can drive at night in poor weather with mud obscuring all their sensors...............................​......................................​...........

I don't get this argument at all. Worst case, the human can just take over. Why base your opinion of something on the super edge case?

I drive a normal, low(ish) 2wd, RWD live axle sprung car in the Australian outback (on dirt).

Why do people prefer 4wd's?


Um... what?
 
2021-02-24 4:07:55 AM  
They're going to turn these loose in Las Vegas? It's going to be great watching them try to maneuver through the road construction areas.
 
2021-02-24 6:07:48 AM  

Likwit: Boomstickz: Likwit: jtotheroc: Let me know when they can drive at night in poor weather with mud obscuring all their sensors...............................​......................................​...........

I don't get this argument at all. Worst case, the human can just take over. Why base your opinion of something on the super edge case?

I drive a normal, low(ish) 2wd, RWD live axle sprung car in the Australian outback (on dirt).

Why do people prefer 4wd's?

Um... what?


The point I'm trying to make is that people in the outback prefer a 4wd over a 2WD because they are guaranteed to be able to deal with everything: it's a edge case, piece of mind, even tho 99 percent of the time you don't need it.

I'm not sure that people are going to be totally happy with driverless cars until all these cases are worked out.

I think it's more a legal issue, but it's something to think about. Saying that driverless cars have finally arrived due to a case like this (or even a Tesla autopilot working in light traffic), misses the point
 
2021-02-24 6:44:20 AM  

Boomstickz: Likwit: Boomstickz: Likwit: jtotheroc: Let me know when they can drive at night in poor weather with mud obscuring all their sensors...............................​......................................​...........

I don't get this argument at all. Worst case, the human can just take over. Why base your opinion of something on the super edge case?

I drive a normal, low(ish) 2wd, RWD live axle sprung car in the Australian outback (on dirt).

Why do people prefer 4wd's?

Um... what?

The point I'm trying to make is that people in the outback prefer a 4wd over a 2WD because they are guaranteed to be able to deal with everything: it's a edge case, piece of mind, even tho 99 percent of the time you don't need it.

I'm not sure that people are going to be totally happy with driverless cars until all these cases are worked out.

I think it's more a legal issue, but it's something to think about. Saying that driverless cars have finally arrived due to a case like this (or even a Tesla autopilot working in light traffic), misses the point


It doesn't really matter what people prefer. If these cars prove to be better than human drivers, and they probably will, they'll be the next thing if we like it or not. The human can always handle the edge cases
 
2021-02-24 6:51:42 AM  
This one us Hyundai's joint venture. From what I am seeing I think hyundai is going to do very well in the electric autonomous car realm (see yesterday's dark post about their electric vehicles). Probably going to beat tesla in the long run.
 
2021-02-24 7:54:39 AM  

Marksrevenge: jtotheroc: Let me know when they can drive at night in poor weather with mud obscuring all their sensors...............................​......................................​...........

You're going to insist that driverless cars must be able to master the worst possible conditions before anyone considers adopting them in any conditions whatsoever? Let people test driverless cars in Phoenix and LA. The conditions are fairly constant and frankly, the only competition the driverless cars have to beat is average human drivers. And average human drivers are prone to drunkenness, distraction, being high, mental breaks, sleep deprivation, etc etc.


These are level 4, as in no safety driver, so yes, it better be able to handle the worst conditions.

I imagine legal liability will severely limit what autonomous cars are able to do in the near future.
 
2021-02-24 11:05:24 AM  

phimuskapsi: Marksrevenge: jtotheroc: Let me know when they can drive at night in poor weather with mud obscuring all their sensors...............................​......................................​...........

You're going to insist that driverless cars must be able to master the worst possible conditions before anyone considers adopting them in any conditions whatsoever? Let people test driverless cars in Phoenix and LA. The conditions are fairly constant and frankly, the only competition the driverless cars have to beat is average human drivers. And average human drivers are prone to drunkenness, distraction, being high, mental breaks, sleep deprivation, etc etc.

These are level 4, as in no safety driver, so yes, it better be able to handle the worst conditions.

I imagine legal liability will severely limit what autonomous cars are able to do in the near future.


The approach of "they'd better be 100% flawless in a blizzardnadocane with zero visibility and 100 MPH winds or I'll never consider having one deliver pizza and beer to me on a nice day" is silly. If we can get these things capable of puttering around town running errands at a lower risk rate than average humans, they will have a place even if they're not ready yet to replace human drivers in all situations.
 
2021-02-24 11:43:52 AM  

Marksrevenge: The approach of "they'd better be 100% flawless in a blizzardnadocane with zero visibility and 100 MPH winds or I'll never consider having one deliver pizza and beer to me on a nice day" is silly. If we can get these things capable of puttering around town running errands at a lower risk rate than average humans, they will have a place even if they're not ready yet to replace human drivers in all situations.



'Lower risk rate' assumes that the car is not driving with those same average humans who are unpredictable. It's less a problem with the software on the car, and more a problem of how it handles driving around other people. City/local driving is one of the larger sources of accidents, not highway driving.

Let me ask you another theoretical question:
If a car decided that an accident was going to only kill you and save another car, would you still get in it? How does a computer even approach something like the 'trolley problem'?
 
2021-02-24 12:54:50 PM  
PhD in comp sci here (area of research: AI, especially unsupervised machine learning).

The problem isn't the AI. IF the AI is operating with perfect knowledge of its environment, it will do fine.
The problem is 'computer vision' and how it gets this knowledge of the environment in which it operates. Until every vehicle has a transponder or something computer vision systems will make lethal mistakes (oh, I thought that was the horizon... and it was a white semi? my bad).
 
2021-02-24 2:41:53 PM  

foo monkey: In their defense, 90% of traffic in Vegas goes down the strip, turns around, and goes back up the other side. That's a relatively simple algorithm to write.


But wait - the strip isn't actually IN Las Vegas!
 
Displayed 23 of 23 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.