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(CTV News)   Another example of why trying to put out a flame with water may not be such a good idea. "But it was just a damned candle, FFS"   (montreal.ctvnews.ca) divider line
    More: Obvious, Flame, Fire, Candle, glass container, Beeswax, Government statistics, Hilary Cohen, Paraffin  
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4447 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Feb 2021 at 11:05 PM (5 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



30 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
6 days ago  
Jesus Christ, people are dumb.
 
6 days ago  
What a bunch of Dollards.
 
5 days ago  
Hanukkah must be fun for them
 
5 days ago  
It never occurred to me to use water to put out a candle.
 
5 days ago  

cretinbob: Jesus Christ, people are dumb.


That comma can go almost anywhere in that sentence
 
5 days ago  
As a cook who has dealt with a few fires involving grease/fats, SMOTHER THAT shiat.

If that doesn't work, fire extinguisher time.
 
5 days ago  

Mister Buttons: As a cook who has dealt with a few fires involving grease/fats, SMOTHER THAT shiat.

If that doesn't work, fire extinguisher time.


Have you ever dealt with Canadians though?
 
5 days ago  
A candle is made of wax, AKA grease.  Don't throw water on a candle.
 
5 days ago  
ALSO gasoline that is on fire..... spraying it with water will make the flames go allll over the damn place.
And ALSO don't put water on a grease fire. LOL big bada-boom
 
5 days ago  
Wife and I use candles during sex sometimes but it's mainly for the hot wax.
 
5 days ago  
Had to help with a few fires during my time in the navy.  DO NOT put water on a fire that has a liquid fuel or is an electrical fire, and make sure you have a good CO2 extinguisher easily accessible in your house, preferably two in case it's blocked off.

/I also learned much since I'm a massive pyromaniac.
//no flame inside the house though, modern homes are goddamn tinderboxes.
 
5 days ago  
Candlemakers recommend the wick be trimmed to no more than a quarter inch before use.

That is what I do to avoid freak candle fires!
 
5 days ago  

Theeng: //no flame inside the house though, modern homes are goddamn tinderboxes.


What?  How?  Are you putting candles on a live Christmas tree or something?  Pretty much everything in a modern home is made of fire retardant material.  You really have to try or be kind of dumb to set a modern home on fire.
 
5 days ago  

Bootleg: What a bunch of Dollards.


Even the Dillards were shocked

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
5 days ago  

Tom Marvolo Bombadil: Candlemakers recommend the wick be trimmed to no more than a quarter inch before use.

That is what I do to avoid freak candle fires!


They said you need a 1/4" clipped wick
 
5 days ago  

Mister Buttons: As a cook who has dealt with a few fires involving grease/fats, SMOTHER THAT shiat.

If that doesn't work, fire extinguisher time.


If you're a professional then you probably know this, but for the benefit of others: make sure you have a class K fire extinguisher for kitchen grease fires.

General-purpose fire extinguishers may not be effective (as is the case with CO2 extinguishers) and water extinguishers will make the problem explosively worse.
 
5 days ago  
Hay. Guys. Little help.
Does the wick thing mean short wick good long bad?
Or does it mean the opposite?
Or does it mean wick should always be a specifically?
 
5 days ago  

waxbeans: Hay. Guys. Little help.
Does the wick thing mean short wick good long bad?
Or does it mean the opposite?
Or does it mean wick should always be a specifically?


Yes.  The shorter the wick, the less chance of it curling over back into the wax pool and causing a fire.  Candle fires are caused by wax vapor unable to be drawn up the wick and burned off.  If the wick is too long, it creates a higher temperature melt pool and the wick can't burn off the wax fast enough and eventually it will all go up.  Another way to avoid candle fires is to not let them burn for more than 4 hours.  After 4 hours, you can blow out the candle, trim the wick, and light it again.
 
5 days ago  
I never really saw the draw of burning anything in the house outside of stoves and furnaces.
 
5 days ago  
Put A Lid On It - Squirrel Nut Zippers (1996)
Youtube na1yQ_fKUF0
 
5 days ago  
Did the Biden's burn down the White House?
 
5 days ago  
These people are idiots and cowards.
 
5 days ago  

Theeng: Had to help with a few fires during my time in the navy.  DO NOT put water on a fire that has a liquid fuel or is an electrical fire, and make sure you have a good CO2 extinguisher easily accessible in your house, preferably two in case it's blocked off.

/I also learned much since I'm a massive pyromaniac.
//no flame inside the house though, modern homes are goddamn tinderboxes.


If you think homes are a tinderbox try an RV, lol. None of that pansy 60 minute gypsum board in an RV, just platic and 1/8-1/16th wood paneling with zero fire breaks. That's why I carry a wool fire blanket, two ABC extinguishers and do most of my cooking outdoors.
 
5 days ago  
Dude on that video had the dual Rock eyebrows going on

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
5 days ago  

Dr. DJ Duckhunt: It never occurred to me to use water to put out a candle.


Maybe when I was five or six...but I wouldn't have been actually putting out candles at that age.
 
5 days ago  

robodog: Theeng: Had to help with a few fires during my time in the navy.  DO NOT put water on a fire that has a liquid fuel or is an electrical fire, and make sure you have a good CO2 extinguisher easily accessible in your house, preferably two in case it's blocked off.

/I also learned much since I'm a massive pyromaniac.
//no flame inside the house though, modern homes are goddamn tinderboxes.

If you think homes are a tinderbox try an RV, lol. None of that pansy 60 minute gypsum board in an RV, just platic and 1/8-1/16th wood paneling with zero fire breaks. That's why I carry a wool fire blanket, two ABC extinguishers and do most of my cooking outdoors.


That's because RVs are death traps in a fire, but yeah an extinguisher rated for ABC fires is always fine.  Also if you're using CO2 be very liberal with using it, the big downside is it doesn't offer any protection from the fire flaring back up (reflash).
 
5 days ago  

WalkingSedgwick: Mister Buttons: As a cook who has dealt with a few fires involving grease/fats, SMOTHER THAT shiat.

If that doesn't work, fire extinguisher time.

If you're a professional then you probably know this, but for the benefit of others: make sure you have a class K fire extinguisher for kitchen grease fires.

General-purpose fire extinguishers may not be effective (as is the case with CO2 extinguishers) and water extinguishers will make the problem explosively worse.


A bit more detail.  In the case of a stovetop grease fire, be careful!  These fires burn very hot and can be difficut to manage.  The two core objectives are to seperate the heat source (the stove) and the fire, and to smother the fire.  This is much easier said than done.  For most relatively small grease fires, keep a box or two of baking soda nearby, but not above or immediately adjacent to the stovetop.  BEFORE attempting anything else, sprinkle soda generously over the fire starting from the edge.   Once the flames have been damped down turn off the burner.   Continue applying soda until extinguished. In general, do not try to move the fire as this risks spilling and spreading.  Possibly to you.  Alternately if you have a glass type cutting board, slide it over the container, then turn off the heat.  If the control to turn off the heat can be reached without burning yourself, do that first.  Then smother the fire.  Obviously a PROPER type extinguisher is best, but may not be avaiable.  Just remember, DON'T PANIC, deprive the fire of heat source and oxygen.  DO NOT USE AN ABC EXTINGUISHER.   These have a high discharge rate and will spread the fire.  NO WATER!!!CO2 will damp the flames, but only very briefly.  If used directly on the flame they will cause spread and condensation from the freezinf gas may intrduce spattering and spread.
 
5 days ago  

Mike_1962: If the control to turn off the heat can be reached without burning yourself, do that first.


Alternatively, if there are two people in the house at the time, send one person to turn off the stove (or whole house) gas valve / circuit breaker while the other person fights the fire.
 
5 days ago  

mikaloyd: Mister Buttons: As a cook who has dealt with a few fires involving grease/fats, SMOTHER THAT shiat.

If that doesn't work, fire extinguisher time.

Have you ever dealt with Canadians though?


Smothering works on Canadians too...
 
5 days ago  

WalkingSedgwick: Mike_1962: If the control to turn off the heat can be reached without burning yourself, do that first.

Alternatively, if there are two people in the house at the time, send one person to turn off the stove (or whole house) gas valve / circuit breaker while the other person fights the fire.


Absolutely!
 
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