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(History Channel)   On this day in history, in 1804, the U.S. Navy staged a daring mission to destroy a captured American frigate in the First Barbary War, in bold move that popularized the legendary "Shave and a Haircut, Six Bits" song   (history.com) divider line
    More: Vintage, Tripoli, First Barbary War, Stephen Decatur, American sailors, U.S. Lieutenant Stephen Decatur, Thomas Jefferson, War of 1812, United States  
•       •       •

2251 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Feb 2021 at 3:50 PM (40 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-02-16 1:05:05 PM  
Current USS Decatur:

upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size
 
2021-02-16 1:39:42 PM  
Tell me again how the founding fathers never had to deal with any terrorist states
 
2021-02-16 3:20:37 PM  
From the Halls of Montezuma to the shores of Tripoli...

Semper Fi.
 
2021-02-16 3:51:51 PM  
I thought it was usually "two bits".  Who used "six bits"?
 
2021-02-16 3:52:10 PM  
How about leaving the bad jokes with the word-of-the-day headlines?
 
2021-02-16 3:54:04 PM  

Ambitwistor: I thought it was usually "two bits".  Who used "six bits"?


These are trying times.
 
2021-02-16 3:54:38 PM  
Chinga tu madre, cabron
 
2021-02-16 3:55:54 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-02-16 3:57:22 PM  

teto85: From the Halls of Montezuma to the shores of Tripoli...

Semper Fi.


Yut.
 
2021-02-16 3:57:39 PM  

Ambitwistor: I thought it was usually "two bits".  Who used "six bits"?


Inflation...
 
2021-02-16 3:57:43 PM  
Deep cut, subby
+1
 
2021-02-16 3:58:02 PM  

Ambitwistor: I thought it was usually "two bits".  Who used "six bits"?


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six-bia​t​character_code
 
2021-02-16 4:00:33 PM  
gannett-cdn.comView Full Size
 
2021-02-16 4:00:40 PM  
"Called my wife a two bit whore.  She hit me with a bag of quarters."   lyrics from the Subby's song
 
2021-02-16 4:01:15 PM  

leviosaurus: Tell me again how the founding fathers never had to deal with any terrorist states


Pirates are terrorists?
 
2021-02-16 4:01:29 PM  
I'll pay a quarter if you look up the song and figure out how wrong subby's headline is.
 
2021-02-16 4:03:13 PM  
Brother needs / a little off the top
in the Fuzzy Pumper Barber Shop
 
2021-02-16 4:05:49 PM  

H31N0US: leviosaurus: Tell me again how the founding fathers never had to deal with any terrorist states

Pirates are terrorists?


I'm pretty sure this was settled back in 2001. Disney will eventually have to update Pirates of the Caribbean with Terrorists of Agrabah. Just stick a turban on the robot carrying TNT.
 
2021-02-16 4:08:26 PM  
What sort of two-bit headline is this now?
 
2021-02-16 4:14:31 PM  

dittybopper: Ambitwistor: I thought it was usually "two bits".  Who used "six bits"?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six-biat​character_code


Anyone else noticed the link was filter pwned.
 
2021-02-16 4:15:16 PM  

nursetim: dittybopper: Ambitwistor: I thought it was usually "two bits".  Who used "six bits"?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six-biat​character_code

Anyone else noticed the link was filter pwned.


Yep, I lurve teh Fark filter. 😊
 
2021-02-16 4:15:38 PM  
OK, I am confused. I remember learning about 6 bits (computer networking?) as part of lecture in 1977. I read Stephen Decatur's biography at 12.  I lived in an area where all of the middle school's where named after revolutionary war naval heroes.  But there are some pretty arcane references thread I do not get. How does this thread relate to a 'shave and a haircut' song from 1899?
 
2021-02-16 4:21:45 PM  
International Morse Code "dash dot dot dash dot, dot dash" - that's /a (slash-a), which means attention is the 'secret knock' that everyone uses, no idea what the connection is, spies maybe?
 
2021-02-16 4:24:24 PM  

H31N0US: leviosaurus: Tell me again how the founding fathers never had to deal with any terrorist states

Pirates are terrorists?


These guys were.

/I linked to a Heritage Foundation article. Need to go take a shower now.
 
2021-02-16 4:24:31 PM  

rusty typewriter: How does this thread relate to a 'shave and a haircut' song from 1899?


"Barbary War" -> "barber" -> "shave and a haircut"
 
2021-02-16 4:25:22 PM  

jokerscrowbar: International Morse Code "dash dot dot dash dot, dot dash" - that's /a (slash-a), which means attention is the 'secret knock' that everyone uses, no idea what the connection is, spies maybe?


I saw that on the googles too. It's stupid because "two bits" are both sung with the same length, not "dot dash".

"Pieces-of-eight" referred to the practice of cutting a gold dubloon into 8 bits for smaller currency. "Two bits" would be a quarter of a dubloon, hence the nickname for a quarter-dollar as "two bits"

rusty typewriter: How does this thread relate to a 'shave and a haircut' song from 1899?


Barber-y. Barbary.
 
2021-02-16 4:25:48 PM  
I believe the Marine Corps hymn mentions something about this.
 
2021-02-16 4:28:37 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-02-16 4:29:35 PM  
 
2021-02-16 4:55:16 PM  

teto85: From the Halls of Montezuma to the shores of Tripoli...

Semper Fi.


You can sing it to the tune of "Oh my darling, Clementine."
 
2021-02-16 5:03:03 PM  

jokerscrowbar: International Morse Code "dash dot dot dash dot, dot dash" - that's /a (slash-a), which means attention is the 'secret knock' that everyone uses, no idea what the connection is, spies maybe?


There are no dashes and no dots in Morse code.  It's all dits and dahs.

The only time you will hear a /A in Morse is after a callsign, and followed by an M, meaning the station is aeronautical mobile.

Also, what you're thinking of is ESE EE.   "Dit dididit dit, dit dit".  That's "Shave and a haircut, two bits".   Often when stations sign, they'll send "dit dit" to each other as the short form of that.

Finally, you can't use Morse code as a secret knock, because you can't tell a dit from a dah with a knock, especially at the end of a character.

If I send "knock knock", is that an A (didah), or an I (didit)?   No way for you to tell.

Only for unique patterns like SOS (dididit dadadah dididit)* can you really tell

*Technically it should be run together as all one "letter", but it gets hard to read that way.
 
2021-02-16 5:05:14 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-02-16 5:09:17 PM  

dittybopper: jokerscrowbar: International Morse Code "dash dot dot dash dot, dot dash" - that's /a (slash-a), which means attention is the 'secret knock' that everyone uses, no idea what the connection is, spies maybe?

There are no dashes and no dots in Morse code.  It's all dits and dahs.

The only time you will hear a /A in Morse is after a callsign, and followed by an M, meaning the station is aeronautical mobile.

Also, what you're thinking of is ESE EE.   "Dit dididit dit, dit dit".  That's "Shave and a haircut, two bits".   Often when stations sign, they'll send "dit dit" to each other as the short form of that.

Finally, you can't use Morse code as a secret knock, because you can't tell a dit from a dah with a knock, especially at the end of a character.

If I send "knock knock", is that an A (didah), or an I (didit)?   No way for you to tell.

Only for unique patterns like SOS (dididit dadadah dididit)* can you really tell

*Technically it should be run together as all one "letter", but it gets hard to read that way.


the rhythm may be tapped as a door knock[8][9][10][11][12][13]​[14][15] or as a Morse code "dah-di-di-dah-di, di-dit" ( -··-·   ·· )[16] at the end of an amateur radio contact.
The former prisoner of war and U.S. Navy seaman Doug Hegdahl reports fellow U.S. captives in the Vietnam War would authenticate a new prisoner's U.S. identity by using "Shave and a Haircut" as a shibboleth, tapping the first five notes against a cell wall and waiting for the appropriate response. U.S. POWs were then able to communicate securely with one another via the quadratic alphabet code.[17]

Everything you typed-was wrong
 
2021-02-16 5:15:51 PM  

syrynxx: jokerscrowbar: International Morse Code "dash dot dot dash dot, dot dash" - that's /a (slash-a), which means attention is the 'secret knock' that everyone uses, no idea what the connection is, spies maybe?

I saw that on the googles too. It's stupid because "two bits" are both sung with the same length, not "dot dash".

"Pieces-of-eight" referred to the practice of cutting a gold dubloon into 8 bits for smaller currency. "Two bits" would be a quarter of a dubloon, hence the nickname for a quarter-dollar as "two bits"

rusty typewriter: How does this thread relate to a 'shave and a haircut' song from 1899?

Barber-y. Barbary.


<eye roll>
 
2021-02-16 5:25:17 PM  

syrynxx: jokerscrowbar: International Morse Code "dash dot dot dash dot, dot dash" - that's /a (slash-a), which means attention is the 'secret knock' that everyone uses, no idea what the connection is, spies maybe?

I saw that on the googles too. It's stupid because "two bits" are both sung with the same length, not "dot dash".

"Pieces-of-eight" referred to the practice of cutting a gold dubloon into 8 bits for smaller currency. "Two bits" would be a quarter of a dubloon, hence the nickname for a quarter-dollar as "two bits"

rusty typewriter: How does this thread relate to a 'shave and a haircut' song from 1899?

Barber-y. Barbary.

dash dot dot dash dot, dot dash is also known as the Malta welcome and  Decatur used Malta as a base against the Barbars
Best I could come with

 
2021-02-16 5:59:19 PM  
Orit could just be a lame pun ; )
 
2021-02-16 6:23:59 PM  

rusty typewriter: syrynxx: jokerscrowbar: International Morse Code "dash dot dot dash dot, dot dash" - that's /a (slash-a), which means attention is the 'secret knock' that everyone uses, no idea what the connection is, spies maybe?

I saw that on the googles too. It's stupid because "two bits" are both sung with the same length, not "dot dash".

"Pieces-of-eight" referred to the practice of cutting a gold dubloon into 8 bits for smaller currency. "Two bits" would be a quarter of a dubloon, hence the nickname for a quarter-dollar as "two bits"

rusty typewriter: How does this thread relate to a 'shave and a haircut' song from 1899?

Barber-y. Barbary.

<eye roll>


media.tenor.comView Full Size
 
2021-02-16 6:28:42 PM  
I knew exactly what subby was referring to and the punchline was awesome.
 
2021-02-16 6:30:25 PM  

mikaloyd: Chinga tu madre, cabron


No filters for "f*ck" in Español. I'm gonna have to remember that. Thanks.
 
2021-02-16 7:12:03 PM  

rusty typewriter: syrynxx: jokerscrowbar: International Morse Code "dash dot dot dash dot, dot dash" - that's /a (slash-a), which means attention is the 'secret knock' that everyone uses, no idea what the connection is, spies maybe?

I saw that on the googles too. It's stupid because "two bits" are both sung with the same length, not "dot dash".

"Pieces-of-eight" referred to the practice of cutting a gold dubloon into 8 bits for smaller currency. "Two bits" would be a quarter of a dubloon, hence the nickname for a quarter-dollar as "two bits"

rusty typewriter: How does this thread relate to a 'shave and a haircut' song from 1899?

Barber-y. Barbary.

<eye roll>


Darn it, Rusty, don't you get it. Subby is referring to an event that occurred in 1804 by using a code developed in the 1840's by referring to a song from 1899 using a 6 bits vs 2 in the song. it is so obvious.
 
2021-02-16 7:12:19 PM  
I'm thinking it's high time we go get the USS Pueblo back. Or at least scuttle it. I mean the Norks couldn't get too pissy if we dropped a harpoon missle on it, since it's US property after all.
 
2021-02-16 7:18:22 PM  

rusty typewriter: rusty typewriter: syrynxx: jokerscrowbar: International Morse Code "dash dot dot dash dot, dot dash" - that's /a (slash-a), which means attention is the 'secret knock' that everyone uses, no idea what the connection is, spies maybe?

I saw that on the googles too. It's stupid because "two bits" are both sung with the same length, not "dot dash".

"Pieces-of-eight" referred to the practice of cutting a gold dubloon into 8 bits for smaller currency. "Two bits" would be a quarter of a dubloon, hence the nickname for a quarter-dollar as "two bits"

rusty typewriter: How does this thread relate to a 'shave and a haircut' song from 1899?

Barber-y. Barbary.

<eye roll>

Darn it, Rusty, don't you get it. Subby is referring to an event that occurred in 1804 by using a code developed in the 1840's by referring to a song from 1899 using a 6 bits vs 2 in the song. it is so obvious.


Rusty, you are right. I should have picked on this immediately. LOL. now that you point it out.
 
2021-02-16 7:27:37 PM  

rusty typewriter: rusty typewriter: rusty typewriter: syrynxx: jokerscrowbar: International Morse Code "dash dot dot dash dot, dot dash" - that's /a (slash-a), which means attention is the 'secret knock' that everyone uses, no idea what the connection is, spies maybe?

I saw that on the googles too. It's stupid because "two bits" are both sung with the same length, not "dot dash".

"Pieces-of-eight" referred to the practice of cutting a gold dubloon into 8 bits for smaller currency. "Two bits" would be a quarter of a dubloon, hence the nickname for a quarter-dollar as "two bits"

rusty typewriter: How does this thread relate to a 'shave and a haircut' song from 1899?

Barber-y. Barbary.

<eye roll>

Darn it, Rusty, don't you get it. Subby is referring to an event that occurred in 1804 by using a code developed in the 1840's by referring to a song from 1899 using a 6 bits vs 2 in the song. it is so obvious.

Rusty, you are right. I should have picked on this immediately. LOL. now that you point it out.


You moron Rusty, you have no appreciation of the flag semaphores from the 17th century. Even though no one refences it in this thread.
 
2021-02-16 7:40:38 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size

Got nuthin'
 
2021-02-16 8:21:00 PM  

leviosaurus: Tell me again how the founding fathers never had to deal with any terrorist states


Some were domestic. The whiskey rebellion comes to mind.
 
2021-02-16 8:24:54 PM  

jokerscrowbar: the rhythm may be tapped as a door knock[8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15] or as a Morse code "dah-di-di-dah-di, di-dit" ( -··-·   ·· )[16] at the end of an amateur radio contact.
The former prisoner of war and U.S. Navy seaman Doug Hegdahl reports fellow U.S. captives in the Vietnam War would authenticate a new prisoner's U.S. identity by using "Shave and a Haircut" as a shibboleth, tapping the first five notes against a cell wall and waiting for the appropriate response. U.S. POWs were then able to communicate securely with one another via the quadratic alphabet code.[17]

Everything you typed-was wrong


First of all, you don't know who you're talking to, that's farkin' obvious.

I was a "ditty bopper" for the US Army, meaning I was a 05H Electronic Warfare Signals Intelligence Morse Interceptor.  It was literally my job to copy Morse code for the US Army, and what I copied went straight to the NSA at Fort Meade.

But that was a long time ago, about 32 years ago.   Turns out, I missed Morse code when I got out of the Army, so about 6 months after I got out, I got my ham radio license.   And I've been using Morse code to talk to people all over the US and indeed the World since then.

I'm sitting at a desk that has 6 radios on it right now, and at least 3 Morse keys.

I go to the park sometimes, throw an antenna up in the trees, and talk to people using Morse code.

The local ham radio club always invites me for Field Day, because Morse code contacts are worth twice the points as voice contacts.  They always hook me up with the best radio and antenna at the site.

I talk to people using Morse code in my *CAR*.  Yes, I have an HF radio in my car, with a big 7 foot tall "hamstick" style antenna, and I use a Yugoslav Army "knee key" while I'm driving.

Given that I have something like 36 years of using Morse, including professional experience, I'm gonna claim expert status here.   So let's take you statements.

the rhythm may be tapped as a door knock[8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15]

That's not Morse code, though, because again, you can't distinguish between a "dit" or a "dah" from a knock.

or as a Morse code "dah-di-di-dah-di, di-dit" ( -··-·  ·· )[16] at the end of an amateur radio contact.

I've had more Morse code amateur radio contacts than you've had hot meals, and *NOBODY* sends it like that.   If we do the long form, one person sends 'dit dididit dit' and the other sends 'dit dit', but 95% of the time it's just station A sending 'dit dit', and station B sending 'dit dit'.

Nobody sends a slant bar ( dadididadit ) at the end of a contact.   *EVER*.   We'll send 73, SK, some will also send an AR, and the aforementioned "dit dit" thing.

The former prisoner of war and U.S. Navy seaman Doug Hegdahl reports fellow U.S. captives in the Vietnam War would authenticate a new prisoner's U.S. identity by using "Shave and a Haircut" as a shibboleth, tapping the first five notes against a cell wall and waiting for the appropriate response

That's not Morse code, that's a rhythmic recognition symbol.

U.S. POWs were then able to communicate securely with one another via the quadratic alphabet code.[17]

Again, that's not Morse code.

In fact, you have to use a 5x5 or other similar square like this:


1  2  3  4  5
1 A  B  C  D  E
2 F  G  H I/J K
3 L  M  N  O  P
4 Q  R  S  T  U
5 V  W  X  Y  Z

*BECAUSE* you can't distinguish a dit from a dah when using knocks.

Because sending you dididadit dididah is impossible with knocks, but sending tap-tap  tap,  tap-tap-tap-tap  tap-tap-tap-tap-tap.

Everything you typed-was wrong

Piece of advice:  Next time before you think you know more about someone, maybe Google their Nom du Fark.

https://www.quora.com/What-are-ditty-​b​oppers-in-the-US-military

Maybe see if there are some images on Fark that they have posted, too.....

Fark user imageView Full Size


Fark user imageView Full Size


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-02-16 8:57:08 PM  

dittybopper: jokerscrowbar: the rhythm may be tapped as a door knock[8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15] or as a Morse code "dah-di-di-dah-di, di-dit" ( -··-·   ·· )[16] at the end of an amateur radio contact.
The former prisoner of war and U.S. Navy seaman Doug Hegdahl reports fellow U.S. captives in the Vietnam War would authenticate a new prisoner's U.S. identity by using "Shave and a Haircut" as a shibboleth, tapping the first five notes against a cell wall and waiting for the appropriate response. U.S. POWs were then able to communicate securely with one another via the quadratic alphabet code.[17]

Everything you typed-was wrong

First of all, you don't know who you're talking to, that's farkin' obvious.

I was a "ditty bopper" for the US Army, meaning I was a 05H Electronic Warfare Signals Intelligence Morse Interceptor.  It was literally my job to copy Morse code for the US Army, and what I copied went straight to the NSA at Fort Meade.

But that was a long time ago, about 32 years ago.   Turns out, I missed Morse code when I got out of the Army, so about 6 months after I got out, I got my ham radio license.   And I've been using Morse code to talk to people all over the US and indeed the World since then.

I'm sitting at a desk that has 6 radios on it right now, and at least 3 Morse keys.

I go to the park sometimes, throw an antenna up in the trees, and talk to people using Morse code.

The local ham radio club always invites me for Field Day, because Morse code contacts are worth twice the points as voice contacts.  They always hook me up with the best radio and antenna at the site.

I talk to people using Morse code in my *CAR*.  Yes, I have an HF radio in my car, with a big 7 foot tall "hamstick" style antenna, and I use a Yugoslav Army "knee key" while I'm driving.

Given that I have something like 36 years of using Morse, including professional experience, I'm gonna claim expert status here.   So let's take you statements.

the rhythm may be tapped as a door knock[8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15]

That's not Morse code, though, because again, you can't distinguish between a "dit" or a "dah" from a knock.

or as a Morse code "dah-di-di-dah-di, di-dit" ( -··-·  ·· )[16] at the end of an amateur radio contact.

I've had more Morse code amateur radio contacts than you've had hot meals, and *NOBODY* sends it like that.   If we do the long form, one person sends 'dit dididit dit' and the other sends 'dit dit', but 95% of the time it's just station A sending 'dit dit', and station B sending 'dit dit'.

Nobody sends a slant bar ( dadididadit ) at the end of a contact.   *EVER*.   We'll send 73, SK, some will also send an AR, and the aforementioned "dit dit" thing.

The former prisoner of war and U.S. Navy seaman Doug Hegdahl reports fellow U.S. captives in the Vietnam War would authenticate a new prisoner's U.S. identity by using "Shave and a Haircut" as a shibboleth, tapping the first five notes against a cell wall and waiting for the appropriate response

That's not Morse code, that's a rhythmic recognition symbol.

U.S. POWs were then able to communicate securely with one another via the quadratic alphabet code.[17]

Again, that's not Morse code.

In fact, you have to use a 5x5 or other similar square like this:


1  2  3  4  5
1 A  B  C  D  E
2 F  G  H I/J K
3 L  M  N  O  P
4 Q  R  S  T  U
5 V  W  X  Y  Z

*BECAUSE* you can't distinguish a dit from a dah when using knocks.

Because sending you dididadit dididah is impossible with knocks, but sending tap-tap  tap,  tap-tap-tap-tap  tap-tap-tap-tap-tap.

Everything you typed-was wrong

Piece of advice:  Next time before you think you know more about someone, maybe Google their Nom du Fark.

https://www.quora.com/What-are-ditty-b​oppers-in-the-US-military

Maybe see if there are some images on Fark that they have posted, too.....

[Fark user image image 850x1133]

[Fark user image image 640x480]

[Fark user image image 850x637]


Fark user imageView Full Size


// haha you were missed
 
2021-02-16 9:45:44 PM  
https://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryUK​/​HistoryofEngland/Barbary-Pirates-Engli​sh-Slaves/

At one time there were far more English slaves in Africa than there were African slaves in England (we were part of it then)

Castrate the male slaves and you just raid the coast for more.  You can rape the female slaves and get rid of the children too.
 
2021-02-16 9:57:08 PM  

dittybopper: jokerscrowbar: the rhythm may be tapped as a door knock[8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15] or as a Morse code "dah-di-di-dah-di, di-dit" ( -··-·   ·· )[16] at the end of an amateur radio contact.
The former prisoner of war and U.S. Navy seaman Doug Hegdahl reports fellow U.S. captives in the Vietnam War would authenticate a new prisoner's U.S. identity by using "Shave and a Haircut" as a shibboleth, tapping the first five notes against a cell wall and waiting for the appropriate response. U.S. POWs were then able to communicate securely with one another via the quadratic alphabet code.[17]

Everything you typed-was wrong

First of all, you don't know who you're talking to, that's farkin' obvious.

I was a "ditty bopper" for the US Army, meaning I was a 05H Electronic Warfare Signals Intelligence Morse Interceptor.  It was literally my job to copy Morse code for the US Army, and what I copied went straight to the NSA at Fort Meade.

But that was a long time ago, about 32 years ago.   Turns out, I missed Morse code when I got out of the Army, so about 6 months after I got out, I got my ham radio license.   And I've been using Morse code to talk to people all over the US and indeed the World since then.

I'm sitting at a desk that has 6 radios on it right now, and at least 3 Morse keys.

I go to the park sometimes, throw an antenna up in the trees, and talk to people using Morse code.

The local ham radio club always invites me for Field Day, because Morse code contacts are worth twice the points as voice contacts.  They always hook me up with the best radio and antenna at the site.

I talk to people using Morse code in my *CAR*.  Yes, I have an HF radio in my car, with a big 7 foot tall "hamstick" style antenna, and I use a Yugoslav Army "knee key" while I'm driving.

Given that I have something like 36 years of using Morse, including professional experience, I'm gonna claim expert status here.   So let's take you statements.

the rhythm may be tapped as a door knock[8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15]

That's not Morse code, though, because again, you can't distinguish between a "dit" or a "dah" from a knock.

or as a Morse code "dah-di-di-dah-di, di-dit" ( -··-·  ·· )[16] at the end of an amateur radio contact.

I've had more Morse code amateur radio contacts than you've had hot meals, and *NOBODY* sends it like that.   If we do the long form, one person sends 'dit dididit dit' and the other sends 'dit dit', but 95% of the time it's just station A sending 'dit dit', and station B sending 'dit dit'.

Nobody sends a slant bar ( dadididadit ) at the end of a contact.   *EVER*.   We'll send 73, SK, some will also send an AR, and the aforementioned "dit dit" thing.

The former prisoner of war and U.S. Navy seaman Doug Hegdahl reports fellow U.S. captives in the Vietnam War would authenticate a new prisoner's U.S. identity by using "Shave and a Haircut" as a shibboleth, tapping the first five notes against a cell wall and waiting for the appropriate response

That's not Morse code, that's a rhythmic recognition symbol.

U.S. POWs were then able to communicate securely with one another via the quadratic alphabet code.[17]

Again, that's not Morse code.

In fact, you have to use a 5x5 or other similar square like this:


1  2  3  4  5
1 A  B  C  D  E
2 F  G  H I/J K
3 L  M  N  O  P
4 Q  R  S  T  U
5 V  W  X  Y  Z

*BECAUSE* you can't distinguish a dit from a dah when using knocks.

Because sending you dididadit dididah is impossible with knocks, but sending tap-tap  tap,  tap-tap-tap-tap  tap-tap-tap-tap-tap.

Everything you typed-was wrong

Piece of advice:  Next time before you think you know more about someone, maybe Google their Nom du Fark.

https://www.quora.com/What-are-ditty-b​oppers-in-the-US-military

Maybe see if there are some images on Fark that they have posted, too.....

[Fark user image image 850x1133]

[Fark user image image 640x480]

[Fark user image image 850x637]


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2021-02-17 5:18:17 AM  

dittybopper: jokerscrowbar: the rhythm may be tapped as a door knock[8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15] or as a Morse code "dah-di-di-dah-di, di-dit" ( -··-·   ·· )[16] at the end of an amateur radio contact.
The former prisoner of war and U.S. Navy seaman Doug Hegdahl reports fellow U.S. captives in the Vietnam War would authenticate a new prisoner's U.S. identity by using "Shave and a Haircut" as a shibboleth, tapping the first five notes against a cell wall and waiting for the appropriate response. U.S. POWs were then able to communicate securely with one another via the quadratic alphabet code.[17]

Everything you typed-was wrong

First of all, you don't know who you're talking to, that's farkin' obvious.

I was a "ditty bopper" for the US Army, meaning I was a 05H Electronic Warfare Signals Intelligence Morse Interceptor.  It was literally my job to copy Morse code for the US Army, and what I copied went straight to the NSA at Fort Meade.

But that was a long time ago, about 32 years ago.   Turns out, I missed Morse code when I got out of the Army, so about 6 months after I got out, I got my ham radio license.   And I've been using Morse code to talk to people all over the US and indeed the World since then.

I'm sitting at a desk that has 6 radios on it right now, and at least 3 Morse keys.

I go to the park sometimes, throw an antenna up in the trees, and talk to people using Morse code.

The local ham radio club always invites me for Field Day, because Morse code contacts are worth twice the points as voice contacts.  They always hook me up with the best radio and antenna at the site.

I talk to people using Morse code in my *CAR*.  Yes, I have an HF radio in my car, with a big 7 foot tall "hamstick" style antenna, and I use a Yugoslav Army "knee key" while I'm driving.

Given that I have something like 36 years of using Morse, including professional experience, I'm gonna claim expert status here.   So let's take you statements.

the rhythm may be tapped as a door knock[8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15]

That's not Morse code, though, because again, you can't distinguish between a "dit" or a "dah" from a knock.

or as a Morse code "dah-di-di-dah-di, di-dit" ( -··-·  ·· )[16] at the end of an amateur radio contact.

I've had more Morse code amateur radio contacts than you've had hot meals, and *NOBODY* sends it like that.   If we do the long form, one person sends 'dit dididit dit' and the other sends 'dit dit', but 95% of the time it's just station A sending 'dit dit', and station B sending 'dit dit'.

Nobody sends a slant bar ( dadididadit ) at the end of a contact.   *EVER*.   We'll send 73, SK, some will also send an AR, and the aforementioned "dit dit" thing.

The former prisoner of war and U.S. Navy seaman Doug Hegdahl reports fellow U.S. captives in the Vietnam War would authenticate a new prisoner's U.S. identity by using "Shave and a Haircut" as a shibboleth, tapping the first five notes against a cell wall and waiting for the appropriate response

That's not Morse code, that's a rhythmic recognition symbol.

U.S. POWs were then able to communicate securely with one another via the quadratic alphabet code.[17]

Again, that's not Morse code.

In fact, you have to use a 5x5 or other similar square like this:


1  2  3  4  5
1 A  B  C  D  E
2 F  G  H I/J K
3 L  M  N  O  P
4 Q  R  S  T  U
5 V  W  X  Y  Z

*BECAUSE* you can't distinguish a dit from a dah when using knocks.

Because sending you dididadit dididah is impossible with knocks, but sending tap-tap  tap,  tap-tap-tap-tap  tap-tap-tap-tap-tap.

Everything you typed-was wrong

Piece of advice:  Next time before you think you know more about someone, maybe Google their Nom du Fark.

https://www.quora.com/What-are-ditty-b​oppers-in-the-US-military

Maybe see if there are some images on Fark that they have posted, too.....

[Fark user image image 850x1133]

[Fark user image image 640x480]

[Fark user image image 850x637]


It says right there, the rhythm can be tapped you can try it on your desk and as your the only telegraph operator I've heard of that doesn't accept dot/dash as a written form, try long short short long short or dah dit dit dah dit and await reply  when I tap this on my friends window he shouts 'get lost' as in dit dit. Try it while saying shave and a haircut, two bits or any of the other internationally recognised phrases to this very common practice.
Secondly, in morse, dit dah on the end as a greeting or and dit dit on the end as a sign off are also very common. Look it up if you don't believe me.
Third and most important is that those guys didn't have telegraph back then, it would have had to have been the tunethrough a bugle if in battle or 5 flashesof the lamp and two flashes as reply. There is no evidence they did either on this mission. I was stringing a bad pun into something that maybe could have happened because some of the people above didn't get the joke. Prove me wrong.
-..-.  ..
 
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