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(Missoulian)   The pandemic has been hard on small businesses, including...video rental stores?   (missoulian.com) divider line
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617 clicks; posted to Business » and Entertainment » on 02 Feb 2021 at 7:30 AM (13 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-02-02 7:46:19 AM  
In the Midwest we had Family Video.  They folded up as well.  They were a fairly large chain.   There are still some rural areas where the internet bandwidth is too low to be able to stream.  They also rented porn and sold CBD oil,
 
2021-02-02 7:47:04 AM  
So, should I buy the GME dip today?  Seems about as relevant to this thread as a video rental store does to 2020.
 
2021-02-02 7:57:01 AM  
Worried now, I better check my Blockbuster stock.   Wow, it soared 2000% recently going from .0033 to .26.  I think I need to invest more, it is on fire.
 
2021-02-02 8:07:41 AM  

buckybear: sold CBD oil


Wawa and Quick Chek sell that shiat now too what a planet
 
2021-02-02 8:16:32 AM  
We laugh, but if given the choice today to step back into the world back when video rental stores ruled the earth I would elbow each and every Farker in the farking throat to get to that magic portal to the Before-Times.
 
2021-02-02 8:20:26 AM  
There is a guy here in town that runs an actual video rental store, and he is doing just fine.  He acknowledges that streaming has hurt.  But he has 3 things going for him:

1. Retro people still like their DVDs
2. He still gets some titles that streaming just doesn't have
3. Video games make up a large part of his business.  Also, retro gamers.

This really shouldn't be so shocking.
 
2021-02-02 8:33:10 AM  
Not every city is wired up like NYC.  A lot of rural towns in Ontario still have video rental.
 
2021-02-02 8:38:12 AM  

buckybear: In the Midwest we had Family Video.  They folded up as well.  They were a fairly large chain.   There are still some rural areas where the internet bandwidth is too low to be able to stream.  They also rented porn and sold CBD oil,


I was going to say "We still have a couple of Family Video stores in my city", but then I checked, and they're closing ALL Family Video stores, nationwide, as soon as the remaining stores can complete their "going out of business" sales.

That will leave my town with...no video stores. At least, none that I can think of. They were the last.
 
2021-02-02 8:44:45 AM  
I just assumed most video rental places that are still open are just money-laundering operations
 
2021-02-02 9:12:02 AM  

Mega Steve: I just assumed most video rental places that are still open are just money-laundering operations


Possibly this. Also what bank loans money to purchase a farking video store?
 
2021-02-02 9:25:43 AM  

NINEv2: Mega Steve: I just assumed most video rental places that are still open are just money-laundering operations

Possibly this. Also what bank loans money to purchase a farking video store?


I cleaned out my couch last week and bought 3 video stores with the proceeds.
 
2021-02-02 9:46:54 AM  
I think the bigger story is that he only got into the video rental a couple years ago because "the numbers checked out". I mean, maybe, at the time? But you gotta see which way the wind is blowing.
 
2021-02-02 10:10:23 AM  
Yes subby.

There are plenty of business models that can survive in small numbers as mom and pop but can't survive as a S&P 500 mega corporation.
 
2021-02-02 10:13:03 AM  
Even the worst aspects of blockbuster beat streaming
 
2021-02-02 10:20:53 AM  

Leader O'Cola: Even the worst aspects of blockbuster beat streaming


Huh?

Worst aspects of Blockbuster: pay per rental, late fees, all copies of the popular new release are being currently rented, having to leave the house for entertainment

Worst aspects of streaming: older favorites not available, series I'm currently watching may be taken away next month, having to subscribe to multiple services

Gee, I wonder why one of those is a business model of the past and the other is the business model of the present. There are some flaws to streaming but it's not a close competition. At. All.

The combined MONTHLY cost of my Hulu and Netflix and Amazon is the price of 5-6 total Blockbuster rentals.
 
2021-02-02 10:48:51 AM  

durbnpoisn: There is a guy here in town that runs an actual video rental store, and he is doing just fine.  He acknowledges that streaming has hurt.  But he has 3 things going for him:

1. Retro people still like their DVDs
2. He still gets some titles that streaming just doesn't have
3. Video games make up a large part of his business.  Also, retro gamers.

This really shouldn't be so shocking.


Streaming isn't the cornucopia of entertainment that it promises. For one thing, the offerings on streaming services are heavily skewed toward recent movies. HBO Max has some older movies through an agreement with TCM, but if you have a desire to watch Joan Crawford or Clark Gable, you are out of luck. Same thing with foreign films and cult films. Not to mention, the streaming services are constantly adding and removing films so you can never know if a film is available. For instance, the 1978 Dawn of the Dead is not available to stream on any service or own. Luckily, I bought the Anchor Bay 4-disc edition so I can watch it any time I want. That's why I have  an extensive collection of Blu-Rays and DVDs--so I can watch what I want when I want.
 
2021-02-02 10:52:03 AM  

Eddie Hazel's E string: Leader O'Cola: Even the worst aspects of blockbuster beat streaming

Huh?

Worst aspects of Blockbuster: pay per rental, late fees, all copies of the popular new release are being currently rented, having to leave the house for entertainment

Worst aspects of streaming: older favorites not available, series I'm currently watching may be taken away next month, having to subscribe to multiple services

Gee, I wonder why one of those is a business model of the past and the other is the business model of the present. There are some flaws to streaming but it's not a close competition. At. All.

The combined MONTHLY cost of my Hulu and Netflix and Amazon is the price of 5-6 total Blockbuster rentals.


There were a few magical years when streaming wasn't ready for prime time and you could choose from some 60,000 DVDs delivered by mail from Netflix. Bonus: they kept up with the stock and it was rare for a DVD to arrive scratched or broken.

Video stores were always a toss of the dice. If you wanted to watch a specific movie that wasn't a mainstream hit, you'd have to call a bunch of different stores to see if they had it. (One 'local' store did have a big selection: the Video Station in Boulder. But not entirely convenient for a Denver resident.) Even if they had it, it might be checked out. Plus late fees, gotta pay individually for each movie, etc.

Streaming is far from perfect, but far better than the video store days.
 
2021-02-02 11:03:24 AM  

BorgiaGinz: durbnpoisn: There is a guy here in town that runs an actual video rental store, and he is doing just fine.  He acknowledges that streaming has hurt.  But he has 3 things going for him:

1. Retro people still like their DVDs
2. He still gets some titles that streaming just doesn't have
3. Video games make up a large part of his business.  Also, retro gamers.

This really shouldn't be so shocking.

Streaming isn't the cornucopia of entertainment that it promises. For one thing, the offerings on streaming services are heavily skewed toward recent movies. HBO Max has some older movies through an agreement with TCM, but if you have a desire to watch Joan Crawford or Clark Gable, you are out of luck. Same thing with foreign films and cult films. Not to mention, the streaming services are constantly adding and removing films so you can never know if a film is available. For instance, the 1978 Dawn of the Dead is not available to stream on any service or own. Luckily, I bought the Anchor Bay 4-disc edition so I can watch it any time I want. That's why I have  an extensive collection of Blu-Rays and DVDs--so I can watch what I want when I want.


Classic Hollywood film is scattered among a bunch of different services; I'd love a stand-alone TCM service, but I'm guessing they would lose too much in cable fees.

But, Criterion Channel has much of the canon of foreign film, including hundreds of Japanese and French films and some classic Hollywood. Mubi offers recent and in some cases new foreign films, American independent films and cult classics like films by Jodorowsky and Rivette. And Amazon has a lot of B-movies and a decent silent selection, plus some new releases. 

None of it is as good as the magical Netflix days I mentioned in a previous post. But it is better than video store days and much better than back when you had to hope for a re-release or go to a revival theatre to see anything more than a year old.
 
2021-02-02 11:10:52 AM  
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2021-02-02 11:15:45 AM  

AliceBToklasLives: BorgiaGinz: durbnpoisn: There is a guy here in town that runs an actual video rental store, and he is doing just fine.  He acknowledges that streaming has hurt.  But he has 3 things going for him:

1. Retro people still like their DVDs
2. He still gets some titles that streaming just doesn't have
3. Video games make up a large part of his business.  Also, retro gamers.

This really shouldn't be so shocking.

Streaming isn't the cornucopia of entertainment that it promises. For one thing, the offerings on streaming services are heavily skewed toward recent movies. HBO Max has some older movies through an agreement with TCM, but if you have a desire to watch Joan Crawford or Clark Gable, you are out of luck. Same thing with foreign films and cult films. Not to mention, the streaming services are constantly adding and removing films so you can never know if a film is available. For instance, the 1978 Dawn of the Dead is not available to stream on any service or own. Luckily, I bought the Anchor Bay 4-disc edition so I can watch it any time I want. That's why I have  an extensive collection of Blu-Rays and DVDs--so I can watch what I want when I want.

Classic Hollywood film is scattered among a bunch of different services; I'd love a stand-alone TCM service, but I'm guessing they would lose too much in cable fees.

But, Criterion Channel has much of the canon of foreign film, including hundreds of Japanese and French films and some classic Hollywood. Mubi offers recent and in some cases new foreign films, American independent films and cult classics like films by Jodorowsky and Rivette. And Amazon has a lot of B-movies and a decent silent selection, plus some new releases. 

None of it is as good as the magical Netflix days I mentioned in a previous post. But it is better than video store days and much better than back when you had to hope for a re-release or go to a revival theatre to see anything more than a year old.


I have a Criterion Channel subscription, but even they pick and choose. Last November they had a Joan Crawford retrospective, but those films are gone now. Want to watch El Topo or Fantastic Planet? Better hurry or they will be gone.
 
2021-02-02 11:19:40 AM  

Eddie Hazel's E string: Leader O'Cola: Even the worst aspects of blockbuster beat streaming

Huh?

Worst aspects of Blockbuster: pay per rental, late fees, all copies of the popular new release are being currently rented, having to leave the house for entertainment

Worst aspects of streaming: older favorites not available, series I'm currently watching may be taken away next month, having to subscribe to multiple services

Gee, I wonder why one of those is a business model of the past and the other is the business model of the present. There are some flaws to streaming but it's not a close competition. At. All.

The combined MONTHLY cost of my Hulu and Netflix and Amazon is the price of 5-6 total Blockbuster rentals.


This part I've not understood when people talk of the "extreme"cost of various streaming services- it is literally the cost of what in 1990s would be two-three movie rentals. And that's in 1990s dollars.
 
2021-02-02 11:21:30 AM  

AliceBToklasLives: Eddie Hazel's E string: Leader O'Cola: Even the worst aspects of blockbuster beat streaming

Huh?

Worst aspects of Blockbuster: pay per rental, late fees, all copies of the popular new release are being currently rented, having to leave the house for entertainment

Worst aspects of streaming: older favorites not available, series I'm currently watching may be taken away next month, having to subscribe to multiple services

Gee, I wonder why one of those is a business model of the past and the other is the business model of the present. There are some flaws to streaming but it's not a close competition. At. All.

The combined MONTHLY cost of my Hulu and Netflix and Amazon is the price of 5-6 total Blockbuster rentals.

There were a few magical years when streaming wasn't ready for prime time and you could choose from some 60,000 DVDs delivered by mail from Netflix. Bonus: they kept up with the stock and it was rare for a DVD to arrive scratched or broken.

Video stores were always a toss of the dice. If you wanted to watch a specific movie that wasn't a mainstream hit, you'd have to call a bunch of different stores to see if they had it. (One 'local' store did have a big selection: the Video Station in Boulder. But not entirely convenient for a Denver resident.) Even if they had it, it might be checked out. Plus late fees, gotta pay individually for each movie, etc.

Streaming is far from perfect, but far better than the video store days.


Yeah let's not pretend your average blockbuster didn't have an entire wall of rented out recent releases and the spotty coverage of anything else. Hope you like their top 100 drama titles or their 200 comedy movies or their 50 anime features.
 
2021-02-02 12:02:35 PM  

BorgiaGinz: durbnpoisn: There is a guy here in town that runs an actual video rental store, and he is doing just fine.  He acknowledges that streaming has hurt.  But he has 3 things going for him:

1. Retro people still like their DVDs
2. He still gets some titles that streaming just doesn't have
3. Video games make up a large part of his business.  Also, retro gamers.

This really shouldn't be so shocking.

Streaming isn't the cornucopia of entertainment that it promises. For one thing, the offerings on streaming services are heavily skewed toward recent movies. HBO Max has some older movies through an agreement with TCM, but if you have a desire to watch Joan Crawford or Clark Gable, you are out of luck. Same thing with foreign films and cult films. Not to mention, the streaming services are constantly adding and removing films so you can never know if a film is available. For instance, the 1978 Dawn of the Dead is not available to stream on any service or own. Luckily, I bought the Anchor Bay 4-disc edition so I can watch it any time I want. That's why I have  an extensive collection of Blu-Rays and DVDs--so I can watch what I want when I want.


This is the way I feel about it too.  I have Netflix and Disney+.  For now that's all I really need.  Because between those, I get equal amounts of good entertainment and utter disappointment.

I can't even tell you how many times I've said, "Hey, I'd really like to watch [this movie]", and I cannot find it streaming anywhere unless it's for rent - and even then it's sometimes hard to find.  I don't know how many times, but it's close to 100%

Netflix is the worst with that.  There must be a gazillion movies on that service, and damn near none of them are worth watching.

Their original movies are good though, I must say that.
 
2021-02-02 12:08:09 PM  

Fano: Eddie Hazel's E string: Leader O'Cola: Even the worst aspects of blockbuster beat streaming

Huh?

Worst aspects of Blockbuster: pay per rental, late fees, all copies of the popular new release are being currently rented, having to leave the house for entertainment

Worst aspects of streaming: older favorites not available, series I'm currently watching may be taken away next month, having to subscribe to multiple services

Gee, I wonder why one of those is a business model of the past and the other is the business model of the present. There are some flaws to streaming but it's not a close competition. At. All.

The combined MONTHLY cost of my Hulu and Netflix and Amazon is the price of 5-6 total Blockbuster rentals.

This part I've not understood when people talk of the "extreme"cost of various streaming services- it is literally the cost of what in 1990s would be two-three movie rentals. And that's in 1990s dollars.


Does streaming work without internet? No, it doesn't. The monthly cost is closer to 120 than 20. Now you might get other benefit from having internet, but pretending like streaming only costs 20 is false and dishonest.
 
2021-02-02 12:36:08 PM  

Leader O'Cola: Fano: Eddie Hazel's E string: Leader O'Cola: Even the worst aspects of blockbuster beat streaming

Huh?

Worst aspects of Blockbuster: pay per rental, late fees, all copies of the popular new release are being currently rented, having to leave the house for entertainment

Worst aspects of streaming: older favorites not available, series I'm currently watching may be taken away next month, having to subscribe to multiple services

Gee, I wonder why one of those is a business model of the past and the other is the business model of the present. There are some flaws to streaming but it's not a close competition. At. All.

The combined MONTHLY cost of my Hulu and Netflix and Amazon is the price of 5-6 total Blockbuster rentals.

This part I've not understood when people talk of the "extreme"cost of various streaming services- it is literally the cost of what in 1990s would be two-three movie rentals. And that's in 1990s dollars.

Does streaming work without internet? No, it doesn't. The monthly cost is closer to 120 than 20. Now you might get other benefit from having internet, but pretending like streaming only costs 20 is false and dishonest.


Oh I didn't realize we were counting against your cathode ray tube hooked up to a vcr with an antenna and using stolen electricity to make it honest.

Do you feel that the monthly cost of a cable bill was less than the cost of the internet plus Netflix?
 
2021-02-02 12:43:34 PM  

BorgiaGinz: durbnpoisn: There is a guy here in town that runs an actual video rental store, and he is doing just fine.  He acknowledges that streaming has hurt.  But he has 3 things going for him:

1. Retro people still like their DVDs
2. He still gets some titles that streaming just doesn't have
3. Video games make up a large part of his business.  Also, retro gamers.

This really shouldn't be so shocking.

Streaming isn't the cornucopia of entertainment that it promises. For one thing, the offerings on streaming services are heavily skewed toward recent movies. HBO Max has some older movies through an agreement with TCM, but if you have a desire to watch Joan Crawford or Clark Gable, you are out of luck. Same thing with foreign films and cult films. Not to mention, the streaming services are constantly adding and removing films so you can never know if a film is available. For instance, the 1978 Dawn of the Dead is not available to stream on any service or own. Luckily, I bought the Anchor Bay 4-disc edition so I can watch it any time I want. That's why I have  an extensive collection of Blu-Rays and DVDs--so I can watch what I want when I want.


My FIL.has walls of DVDs, VHS, and laser disc movies and TV series.  We borrow stuff from time to time.  I could easily open a small rental place with all of this stuff, maybe CBD on the side.
Wait a minute....
 
2021-02-02 1:50:39 PM  
Redbox, which spoke of ending its kiosks at the end of 2019, still has them up at LA supermarkets.
 
2021-02-02 1:51:09 PM  

buckybear: In the Midwest we had Family Video.  They folded up as well.  They were a fairly large chain.   There are still some rural areas where the internet bandwidth is too low to be able to stream.  They also rented porn and sold CBD oil,


I used to go to Family Video all the time until a couple of years ago they sold both of their building in my city to make for one Family Video. The Family Video was around a mile away, and I used to bike there for fun. I am going to miss Family Video, it was fun looking around to pick movies to watch. What was nice about renting dvds was having the extras on the dvds to watch.
 
2021-02-02 2:09:34 PM  

demonfaerie: I used to go to Family Video all the time until a couple of years ago they sold both of their building in my city to make for one Family Video. The Family Video was around a mile away, and I used to bike there for fun. I am going to miss Family Video, it was fun looking around to pick movies to watch. What was nice about renting dvds was having the extras on the dvds to watch.


I'm confident that You could find a Tube online which provides the exact supplemental content you're looking for.
 
2021-02-02 2:17:10 PM  

Eddie Hazel's E string: demonfaerie: I used to go to Family Video all the time until a couple of years ago they sold both of their building in my city to make for one Family Video. The Family Video was around a mile away, and I used to bike there for fun. I am going to miss Family Video, it was fun looking around to pick movies to watch. What was nice about renting dvds was having the extras on the dvds to watch.

I'm confident that You could find a Tube online which provides the exact supplemental content you're looking for.


Not really. You can find some DVD commentaries ported to YouTube, but even if you did, it loses something not being synced up on your TV with a good sound system.
 
2021-02-02 2:27:15 PM  

Fano: Leader O'Cola: Fano: Eddie Hazel's E string: Leader O'Cola: Even the worst aspects of blockbuster beat streaming

Huh?

Worst aspects of Blockbuster: pay per rental, late fees, all copies of the popular new release are being currently rented, having to leave the house for entertainment

Worst aspects of streaming: older favorites not available, series I'm currently watching may be taken away next month, having to subscribe to multiple services

Gee, I wonder why one of those is a business model of the past and the other is the business model of the present. There are some flaws to streaming but it's not a close competition. At. All.

The combined MONTHLY cost of my Hulu and Netflix and Amazon is the price of 5-6 total Blockbuster rentals.

This part I've not understood when people talk of the "extreme"cost of various streaming services- it is literally the cost of what in 1990s would be two-three movie rentals. And that's in 1990s dollars.

Does streaming work without internet? No, it doesn't. The monthly cost is closer to 120 than 20. Now you might get other benefit from having internet, but pretending like streaming only costs 20 is false and dishonest.

Oh I didn't realize we were counting against your cathode ray tube hooked up to a vcr with an antenna and using stolen electricity to make it honest.

Do you feel that the monthly cost of a cable bill was less than the cost of the internet plus Netflix?


Did you need cable subscription to play a vhs or DVD you rented from blockbuster?
 
2021-02-02 2:28:12 PM  

BorgiaGinz: Eddie Hazel's E string: demonfaerie: I used to go to Family Video all the time until a couple of years ago they sold both of their building in my city to make for one Family Video. The Family Video was around a mile away, and I used to bike there for fun. I am going to miss Family Video, it was fun looking around to pick movies to watch. What was nice about renting dvds was having the extras on the dvds to watch.

I'm confident that You could find a Tube online which provides the exact supplemental content you're looking for.

Not really. You can find some DVD commentaries ported to YouTube, but even if you did, it loses something not being synced up on your TV with a good sound system.


For people who have family members that aren't native English speakers, subtitles on dvds and blurays are invaluable, as well
 
2021-02-02 2:30:23 PM  

BorgiaGinz: Eddie Hazel's E string: demonfaerie: I used to go to Family Video all the time until a couple of years ago they sold both of their building in my city to make for one Family Video. The Family Video was around a mile away, and I used to bike there for fun. I am going to miss Family Video, it was fun looking around to pick movies to watch. What was nice about renting dvds was having the extras on the dvds to watch.

I'm confident that You could find a Tube online which provides the exact supplemental content you're looking for.

Not really. You can find some DVD commentaries ported to YouTube, but even if you did, it loses something not being synced up on your TV with a good sound system.


When OP said "extras on the dvds" I assumed they meant the "making of" and "behind the scenes" bits, nearly all of which is on YouTube, along with content that was never part of the official DVD or Blu-ray releases.

If they were talking about commentary tracks, then you're probably right. Still, I find YT an outstanding resource and I almost never miss physical media.
 
2021-02-02 2:47:53 PM  

Eddie Hazel's E string: Leader O'Cola: Even the worst aspects of blockbuster beat streaming

Huh?

Worst aspects of Blockbuster: pay per rental, late fees, all copies of the popular new release are being currently rented, having to leave the house for entertainment

Worst aspects of streaming: older favorites not available, series I'm currently watching may be taken away next month, having to subscribe to multiple services

Gee, I wonder why one of those is a business model of the past and the other is the business model of the present. There are some flaws to streaming but it's not a close competition. At. All.

The combined MONTHLY cost of my Hulu and Netflix and Amazon is the price of 5-6 total Blockbuster rentals.


Well, it isn't quite that cheap. Hulu (ad free) = $12, Netflix standard = $14, and Amazon prime = $13, for a total of $39. Before Blockbuster went out of business new releases were $3 and older rentals were $1. The thing is, very few new releases get put on streaming sites without paying an additional rental fee, which are typically $5.99 and up, double what rental places used to charge. So those three added together would have got you about 36 movies after tax at Blockbuster.

And lets not forget that if it wasn't for streaming we wouldn't need high speed/unlimited data internet plans, so there's another big chunk of money right there. I'm not saying streaming isn't better, but lets stop pretending we live in some utopia where we get to stream every movie we want for next to nothing, I definitely never spent more than 25-30 bucks a month at Blockbuster.
 
2021-02-02 3:03:18 PM  

ReapTheChaos: Eddie Hazel's E string: The combined MONTHLY cost of my Hulu and Netflix and Amazon is the price of 5-6 total Blockbuster rentals.

Well, it isn't quite that cheap. Hulu (ad free) = $12, Netflix standard = $14, and Amazon prime = $13, for a total of $39. Before Blockbuster went out of business new releases were $3 and older rentals were $1. The thing is, very few new releases get put on streaming sites without paying an additional rental fee, which are typically $5.99 and up, double what rental places used to charge. So those three added together would have got you about 36 movies after tax at Blockbuster.

And lets not forget that if it wasn't for streaming we wouldn't need high speed/unlimited data internet plans, so there's another big chunk of money right there. I'm not saying streaming isn't better, but lets stop pretending we live in some utopia where we get to stream every movie we want for next to nothing, I definitely never spent more than 25-30 bucks a month at Blockbuster.


Perhaps that was the pricing immediately before they went out of business, but I remember rentals were more like $3.99 in 1990s dollars. And that was for maybe 2 nights of watching -- hey, watch out for that late fee!

You mentioned new releases costing more money, but guess what? At Blockbuster the old as dirt films cost just as much to rent as the current ones. And I'm no longer limited by someone else renting the only copy of the film I wanted to watch. Other than the newest of films, I'm generally watching whatever I want, whenever I want, without regard to return windows, all for the price of -- sure, $39 per month in 2021 dollars. That IS damn near a utopia. To pretend otherwise is to flex some serious cheapskate muscles.

If you want to bring up the cost of broadband internet, which I use instead of cable (a huge expense in the 1990s and 2000s that I no longer have), I'm going to bring up the price of your gas and car insurance to drive back and forth to Blockbuster ;-)
 
2021-02-02 3:11:02 PM  

Leader O'Cola: Fano: Leader O'Cola: Fano: Eddie Hazel's E string: Leader O'Cola: Even the worst aspects of blockbuster beat streaming

Huh?

Worst aspects of Blockbuster: pay per rental, late fees, all copies of the popular new release are being currently rented, having to leave the house for entertainment

Worst aspects of streaming: older favorites not available, series I'm currently watching may be taken away next month, having to subscribe to multiple services

Gee, I wonder why one of those is a business model of the past and the other is the business model of the present. There are some flaws to streaming but it's not a close competition. At. All.

The combined MONTHLY cost of my Hulu and Netflix and Amazon is the price of 5-6 total Blockbuster rentals.

This part I've not understood when people talk of the "extreme"cost of various streaming services- it is literally the cost of what in 1990s would be two-three movie rentals. And that's in 1990s dollars.

Does streaming work without internet? No, it doesn't. The monthly cost is closer to 120 than 20. Now you might get other benefit from having internet, but pretending like streaming only costs 20 is false and dishonest.

Oh I didn't realize we were counting against your cathode ray tube hooked up to a vcr with an antenna and using stolen electricity to make it honest.

Do you feel that the monthly cost of a cable bill was less than the cost of the internet plus Netflix?

Did you need cable subscription to play a vhs or DVD you rented from blockbuster?


What I did not like about renting dvds from Blockbuster is renting a movie and finding that it had been returned without being rewound, wasting valuable time in my life.
 
2021-02-02 3:52:15 PM  

Practical_Draconian: Redbox, which spoke of ending its kiosks at the end of 2019, still has them up at LA supermarkets.


I doubt Redbox is going anywhere for awhile.
 
2021-02-02 4:05:37 PM  

ReapTheChaos: Eddie Hazel's E string: Leader O'Cola: Even the worst aspects of blockbuster beat streaming

Huh?

Worst aspects of Blockbuster: pay per rental, late fees, all copies of the popular new release are being currently rented, having to leave the house for entertainment

Worst aspects of streaming: older favorites not available, series I'm currently watching may be taken away next month, having to subscribe to multiple services

Gee, I wonder why one of those is a business model of the past and the other is the business model of the present. There are some flaws to streaming but it's not a close competition. At. All.

The combined MONTHLY cost of my Hulu and Netflix and Amazon is the price of 5-6 total Blockbuster rentals.

Well, it isn't quite that cheap. Hulu (ad free) = $12, Netflix standard = $14, and Amazon prime = $13, for a total of $39. Before Blockbuster went out of business new releases were $3 and older rentals were $1. The thing is, very few new releases get put on streaming sites without paying an additional rental fee, which are typically $5.99 and up, double what rental places used to charge. So those three added together would have got you about 36 movies after tax at Blockbuster.

And lets not forget that if it wasn't for streaming we wouldn't need high speed/unlimited data internet plans, so there's another big chunk of money right there. I'm not saying streaming isn't better, but lets stop pretending we live in some utopia where we get to stream every movie we want for next to nothing, I definitely never spent more than 25-30 bucks a month at Blockbuster.


Slower-speed plans don't exist anymore outside of dialup. I have a plan that's fast enough for streaming, but so slow that it's only available to people like me who were grandfathered in. A similar plan is available to people on welfare. So no, you can't factor in the cost of broadband into streaming.
 
2021-02-02 4:22:03 PM  

Leader O'Cola: Fano: Leader O'Cola: Fano: Eddie Hazel's E string: Leader O'Cola: Even the worst aspects of blockbuster beat streaming

Huh?

Worst aspects of Blockbuster: pay per rental, late fees, all copies of the popular new release are being currently rented, having to leave the house for entertainment

Worst aspects of streaming: older favorites not available, series I'm currently watching may be taken away next month, having to subscribe to multiple services

Gee, I wonder why one of those is a business model of the past and the other is the business model of the present. There are some flaws to streaming but it's not a close competition. At. All.

The combined MONTHLY cost of my Hulu and Netflix and Amazon is the price of 5-6 total Blockbuster rentals.

This part I've not understood when people talk of the "extreme"cost of various streaming services- it is literally the cost of what in 1990s would be two-three movie rentals. And that's in 1990s dollars.

Does streaming work without internet? No, it doesn't. The monthly cost is closer to 120 than 20. Now you might get other benefit from having internet, but pretending like streaming only costs 20 is false and dishonest.

Oh I didn't realize we were counting against your cathode ray tube hooked up to a vcr with an antenna and using stolen electricity to make it honest.

Do you feel that the monthly cost of a cable bill was less than the cost of the internet plus Netflix?

Did you need cable subscription to play a vhs or DVD you rented from blockbuster?


If we are playing this game you can start bragging about getting all your cassette tapes from the library and having a free cycled TV and vcr.

Relative to renting movies, it is approximately as cheap or cheaper for a better, ubiquitous selection that is open 24/7 without late fees.
 
2021-02-02 4:22:14 PM  

Susan'sLittleAdamsApple: Leader O'Cola: Fano: Leader O'Cola: Fano: Eddie Hazel's E string: Leader O'Cola: Even the worst aspects of blockbuster beat streaming

Huh?

Worst aspects of Blockbuster: pay per rental, late fees, all copies of the popular new release are being currently rented, having to leave the house for entertainment

Worst aspects of streaming: older favorites not available, series I'm currently watching may be taken away next month, having to subscribe to multiple services

Gee, I wonder why one of those is a business model of the past and the other is the business model of the present. There are some flaws to streaming but it's not a close competition. At. All.

The combined MONTHLY cost of my Hulu and Netflix and Amazon is the price of 5-6 total Blockbuster rentals.

This part I've not understood when people talk of the "extreme"cost of various streaming services- it is literally the cost of what in 1990s would be two-three movie rentals. And that's in 1990s dollars.

Does streaming work without internet? No, it doesn't. The monthly cost is closer to 120 than 20. Now you might get other benefit from having internet, but pretending like streaming only costs 20 is false and dishonest.

Oh I didn't realize we were counting against your cathode ray tube hooked up to a vcr with an antenna and using stolen electricity to make it honest.

Do you feel that the monthly cost of a cable bill was less than the cost of the internet plus Netflix?

Did you need cable subscription to play a vhs or DVD you rented from blockbuster?

What I did not like about renting dvds from Blockbuster is renting a movie and finding that it had been returned without being rewound, wasting valuable time in my life.


Fun to watch them backwards, though.
 
2021-02-02 5:28:12 PM  

Billy Liar: Susan'sLittleAdamsApple: Leader O'Cola: Fano: Leader O'Cola: Fano: Eddie Hazel's E string: Leader O'Cola: Even the worst aspects of blockbuster beat streaming

Huh?

Worst aspects of Blockbuster: pay per rental, late fees, all copies of the popular new release are being currently rented, having to leave the house for entertainment

Worst aspects of streaming: older favorites not available, series I'm currently watching may be taken away next month, having to subscribe to multiple services

Gee, I wonder why one of those is a business model of the past and the other is the business model of the present. There are some flaws to streaming but it's not a close competition. At. All.

The combined MONTHLY cost of my Hulu and Netflix and Amazon is the price of 5-6 total Blockbuster rentals.

This part I've not understood when people talk of the "extreme"cost of various streaming services- it is literally the cost of what in 1990s would be two-three movie rentals. And that's in 1990s dollars.

Does streaming work without internet? No, it doesn't. The monthly cost is closer to 120 than 20. Now you might get other benefit from having internet, but pretending like streaming only costs 20 is false and dishonest.

Oh I didn't realize we were counting against your cathode ray tube hooked up to a vcr with an antenna and using stolen electricity to make it honest.


So you lost 30 seconds before you watched Gigli for the 300th time.
 
2021-02-02 5:41:17 PM  

Fireproof: ReapTheChaos: Eddie Hazel's E string: Leader O'Cola: Even the worst aspects of blockbuster beat streaming

Huh?

Worst aspects of Blockbuster: pay per rental, late fees, all copies of the popular new release are being currently rented, having to leave the house for entertainment

Worst aspects of streaming: older favorites not available, series I'm currently watching may be taken away next month, having to subscribe to multiple services

Gee, I wonder why one of those is a business model of the past and the other is the business model of the present. There are some flaws to streaming but it's not a close competition. At. All.

The combined MONTHLY cost of my Hulu and Netflix and Amazon is the price of 5-6 total Blockbuster rentals.

Well, it isn't quite that cheap. Hulu (ad free) = $12, Netflix standard = $14, and Amazon prime = $13, for a total of $39. Before Blockbuster went out of business new releases were $3 and older rentals were $1. The thing is, very few new releases get put on streaming sites without paying an additional rental fee, which are typically $5.99 and up, double what rental places used to charge. So those three added together would have got you about 36 movies after tax at Blockbuster.

And lets not forget that if it wasn't for streaming we wouldn't need high speed/unlimited data internet plans, so there's another big chunk of money right there. I'm not saying streaming isn't better, but lets stop pretending we live in some utopia where we get to stream every movie we want for next to nothing, I definitely never spent more than 25-30 bucks a month at Blockbuster.

Slower-speed plans don't exist anymore outside of dialup. I have a plan that's fast enough for streaming, but so slow that it's only available to people like me who were grandfathered in. A similar plan is available to people on welfare. So no, you can't factor in the cost of broadband into streaming.


No clue where you live, but around here you can get broadband plans as low as 10-15 mbps all the way up to 1 gbps, and all but the premium packages come with data caps, some as low as 25-50 gigs. You're not streaming much with that, one full weekend watching Netflix will chew through 50 gigs. So yes, the cost of broadband does figure into it.
 
2021-02-02 5:45:41 PM  

Eddie Hazel's E string: ReapTheChaos: Eddie Hazel's E string: The combined MONTHLY cost of my Hulu and Netflix and Amazon is the price of 5-6 total Blockbuster rentals.

Well, it isn't quite that cheap. Hulu (ad free) = $12, Netflix standard = $14, and Amazon prime = $13, for a total of $39. Before Blockbuster went out of business new releases were $3 and older rentals were $1. The thing is, very few new releases get put on streaming sites without paying an additional rental fee, which are typically $5.99 and up, double what rental places used to charge. So those three added together would have got you about 36 movies after tax at Blockbuster.

And lets not forget that if it wasn't for streaming we wouldn't need high speed/unlimited data internet plans, so there's another big chunk of money right there. I'm not saying streaming isn't better, but lets stop pretending we live in some utopia where we get to stream every movie we want for next to nothing, I definitely never spent more than 25-30 bucks a month at Blockbuster.

Perhaps that was the pricing immediately before they went out of business, but I remember rentals were more like $3.99 in 1990s dollars. And that was for maybe 2 nights of watching -- hey, watch out for that late fee!

You mentioned new releases costing more money, but guess what? At Blockbuster the old as dirt films cost just as much to rent as the current ones. And I'm no longer limited by someone else renting the only copy of the film I wanted to watch. Other than the newest of films, I'm generally watching whatever I want, whenever I want, without regard to return windows, all for the price of -- sure, $39 per month in 2021 dollars. That IS damn near a utopia. To pretend otherwise is to flex some serious cheapskate muscles.

If you want to bring up the cost of broadband internet, which I use instead of cable (a huge expense in the 1990s and 2000s that I no longer have), I'm going to bring up the price of your gas and car insurance to drive back and forth to Blockbuste ...


For the last 8 or so years that video rentals were around, new releases cost $2.99 and the older ones were 99 cents, that includes Blockbuster. The last video rental to go out of business here had a 5 for $5 deal on all rentals for the last couple years they were in business.
 
2021-02-02 6:21:35 PM  

ReapTheChaos: Fireproof: ReapTheChaos: Eddie Hazel's E string: Leader O'Cola: Even the worst aspects of blockbuster beat streaming

Huh?

Worst aspects of Blockbuster: pay per rental, late fees, all copies of the popular new release are being currently rented, having to leave the house for entertainment

Worst aspects of streaming: older favorites not available, series I'm currently watching may be taken away next month, having to subscribe to multiple services

Gee, I wonder why one of those is a business model of the past and the other is the business model of the present. There are some flaws to streaming but it's not a close competition. At. All.

The combined MONTHLY cost of my Hulu and Netflix and Amazon is the price of 5-6 total Blockbuster rentals.

Well, it isn't quite that cheap. Hulu (ad free) = $12, Netflix standard = $14, and Amazon prime = $13, for a total of $39. Before Blockbuster went out of business new releases were $3 and older rentals were $1. The thing is, very few new releases get put on streaming sites without paying an additional rental fee, which are typically $5.99 and up, double what rental places used to charge. So those three added together would have got you about 36 movies after tax at Blockbuster.

And lets not forget that if it wasn't for streaming we wouldn't need high speed/unlimited data internet plans, so there's another big chunk of money right there. I'm not saying streaming isn't better, but lets stop pretending we live in some utopia where we get to stream every movie we want for next to nothing, I definitely never spent more than 25-30 bucks a month at Blockbuster.

Slower-speed plans don't exist anymore outside of dialup. I have a plan that's fast enough for streaming, but so slow that it's only available to people like me who were grandfathered in. A similar plan is available to people on welfare. So no, you can't factor in the cost of broadband into streaming.

No clue where you live, but around here you can get broadband plans as low as 10-15 mbps all the way up to 1 gbps, and all but the premium packages come with data caps, some as low as 25-50 gigs. You're not streaming much with that, one full weekend watching Netflix will chew through 50 gigs. So yes, the cost of broadband does figure into it.


I'm in a more-or-less Spectrum-only area. The slowest speed they offer to the general public is 200 mbps, so it doesn't factor into everyone's costs. I'm personally able to stream with my connection that I just pinged at about 21 mbps.

I'm feeling the desire to dive further down the research rabbit hole, if nothing else, to learn how badly Spectrum is farking us over. What company offers speeds as low as 10-15 mbps?
 
2021-02-02 6:39:02 PM  

ReapTheChaos: Fireproof: ReapTheChaos: Eddie Hazel's E string: Leader O'Cola: Even the worst aspects of blockbuster beat streaming

Huh?

Worst aspects of Blockbuster: pay per rental, late fees, all copies of the popular new release are being currently rented, having to leave the house for entertainment

Worst aspects of streaming: older favorites not available, series I'm currently watching may be taken away next month, having to subscribe to multiple services

Gee, I wonder why one of those is a business model of the past and the other is the business model of the present. There are some flaws to streaming but it's not a close competition. At. All.

The combined MONTHLY cost of my Hulu and Netflix and Amazon is the price of 5-6 total Blockbuster rentals.

Well, it isn't quite that cheap. Hulu (ad free) = $12, Netflix standard = $14, and Amazon prime = $13, for a total of $39. Before Blockbuster went out of business new releases were $3 and older rentals were $1. The thing is, very few new releases get put on streaming sites without paying an additional rental fee, which are typically $5.99 and up, double what rental places used to charge. So those three added together would have got you about 36 movies after tax at Blockbuster.

And lets not forget that if it wasn't for streaming we wouldn't need high speed/unlimited data internet plans, so there's another big chunk of money right there. I'm not saying streaming isn't better, but lets stop pretending we live in some utopia where we get to stream every movie we want for next to nothing, I definitely never spent more than 25-30 bucks a month at Blockbuster.

Slower-speed plans don't exist anymore outside of dialup. I have a plan that's fast enough for streaming, but so slow that it's only available to people like me who were grandfathered in. A similar plan is available to people on welfare. So no, you can't factor in the cost of broadband into streaming.

No clue where you live, but around here you can get broadband plans as low as 10-15 mbps all the way up to 1 gbps, and all but the premium packages come with data caps, some as low as 25-50 gigs. You're not streaming much with that, one full weekend watching Netflix will chew through 50 gigs. So yes, the cost of broadband does figure into it.


Hmm. I live alone and since March I have streamed probably 10 movies a week plus sports plus work Zoom meetings plus everything I do working from home. Haven't come close to my data cap. And my provider is everyone's favorite business, Comcast.

Two caveats: (1) I live alone and multiple devices streaming at the same time do add up: (2) not a gamer, so none of that data usage.
 
2021-02-02 6:58:04 PM  

Fireproof: ReapTheChaos: Fireproof: ReapTheChaos: Eddie Hazel's E string: Leader O'Cola: Even the worst aspects of blockbuster beat streaming

Huh?

Worst aspects of Blockbuster: pay per rental, late fees, all copies of the popular new release are being currently rented, having to leave the house for entertainment

Worst aspects of streaming: older favorites not available, series I'm currently watching may be taken away next month, having to subscribe to multiple services

Gee, I wonder why one of those is a business model of the past and the other is the business model of the present. There are some flaws to streaming but it's not a close competition. At. All.

The combined MONTHLY cost of my Hulu and Netflix and Amazon is the price of 5-6 total Blockbuster rentals.

Well, it isn't quite that cheap. Hulu (ad free) = $12, Netflix standard = $14, and Amazon prime = $13, for a total of $39. Before Blockbuster went out of business new releases were $3 and older rentals were $1. The thing is, very few new releases get put on streaming sites without paying an additional rental fee, which are typically $5.99 and up, double what rental places used to charge. So those three added together would have got you about 36 movies after tax at Blockbuster.

And lets not forget that if it wasn't for streaming we wouldn't need high speed/unlimited data internet plans, so there's another big chunk of money right there. I'm not saying streaming isn't better, but lets stop pretending we live in some utopia where we get to stream every movie we want for next to nothing, I definitely never spent more than 25-30 bucks a month at Blockbuster.

Slower-speed plans don't exist anymore outside of dialup. I have a plan that's fast enough for streaming, but so slow that it's only available to people like me who were grandfathered in. A similar plan is available to people on welfare. So no, you can't factor in the cost of broadband into streaming.

No clue where you live, but around here you can get broadband plans as low as 10-15 mbps all the way up to 1 gbps, and all but the premium packages come with data caps, some as low as 25-50 gigs. You're not streaming much with that, one full weekend watching Netflix will chew through 50 gigs. So yes, the cost of broadband does figure into it.

I'm in a more-or-less Spectrum-only area. The slowest speed they offer to the general public is 200 mbps, so it doesn't factor into everyone's costs. I'm personally able to stream with my connection that I just pinged at about 21 mbps.

I'm feeling the desire to dive further down the research rabbit hole, if nothing else, to learn how badly Spectrum is farking us over. What company offers speeds as low as 10-15 mbps?


Frontier Communications
 
2021-02-02 7:00:11 PM  

Al Czervik: Fireproof: ReapTheChaos: Fireproof: ReapTheChaos: Eddie Hazel's E string: Leader O'Cola: Even the worst aspects of blockbuster beat streaming

Huh?

Worst aspects of Blockbuster: pay per rental, late fees, all copies of the popular new release are being currently rented, having to leave the house for entertainment

Worst aspects of streaming: older favorites not available, series I'm currently watching may be taken away next month, having to subscribe to multiple services

Gee, I wonder why one of those is a business model of the past and the other is the business model of the present. There are some flaws to streaming but it's not a close competition. At. All.

The combined MONTHLY cost of my Hulu and Netflix and Amazon is the price of 5-6 total Blockbuster rentals.

Well, it isn't quite that cheap. Hulu (ad free) = $12, Netflix standard = $14, and Amazon prime = $13, for a total of $39. Before Blockbuster went out of business new releases were $3 and older rentals were $1. The thing is, very few new releases get put on streaming sites without paying an additional rental fee, which are typically $5.99 and up, double what rental places used to charge. So those three added together would have got you about 36 movies after tax at Blockbuster.

And lets not forget that if it wasn't for streaming we wouldn't need high speed/unlimited data internet plans, so there's another big chunk of money right there. I'm not saying streaming isn't better, but lets stop pretending we live in some utopia where we get to stream every movie we want for next to nothing, I definitely never spent more than 25-30 bucks a month at Blockbuster.

Slower-speed plans don't exist anymore outside of dialup. I have a plan that's fast enough for streaming, but so slow that it's only available to people like me who were grandfathered in. A similar plan is available to people on welfare. So no, you can't factor in the cost of broadband into streaming.

No clue where you live, but around here you can get broadband plans as low as 10-15 mbps all the way up to 1 gbps, and all but the premium packages come with data caps, some as low as 25-50 gigs. You're not streaming much with that, one full weekend watching Netflix will chew through 50 gigs. So yes, the cost of broadband does figure into it.

I'm in a more-or-less Spectrum-only area. The slowest speed they offer to the general public is 200 mbps, so it doesn't factor into everyone's costs. I'm personally able to stream with my connection that I just pinged at about 21 mbps.

I'm feeling the desire to dive further down the research rabbit hole, if nothing else, to learn how badly Spectrum is farking us over. What company offers speeds as low as 10-15 mbps?

Frontier Communications


I should clarify, you get that speed with a business line in the country with Frontier, regardless of what plan you have.
 
2021-02-02 7:01:37 PM  

Al Czervik: Al Czervik: Fireproof: ReapTheChaos: Fireproof: ReapTheChaos: Eddie Hazel's E string: Leader O'Cola: Even the worst aspects of blockbuster beat streaming

Huh?

Worst aspects of Blockbuster: pay per rental, late fees, all copies of the popular new release are being currently rented, having to leave the house for entertainment

Worst aspects of streaming: older favorites not available, series I'm currently watching may be taken away next month, having to subscribe to multiple services

Gee, I wonder why one of those is a business model of the past and the other is the business model of the present. There are some flaws to streaming but it's not a close competition. At. All.

The combined MONTHLY cost of my Hulu and Netflix and Amazon is the price of 5-6 total Blockbuster rentals.

Well, it isn't quite that cheap. Hulu (ad free) = $12, Netflix standard = $14, and Amazon prime = $13, for a total of $39. Before Blockbuster went out of business new releases were $3 and older rentals were $1. The thing is, very few new releases get put on streaming sites without paying an additional rental fee, which are typically $5.99 and up, double what rental places used to charge. So those three added together would have got you about 36 movies after tax at Blockbuster.

And lets not forget that if it wasn't for streaming we wouldn't need high speed/unlimited data internet plans, so there's another big chunk of money right there. I'm not saying streaming isn't better, but lets stop pretending we live in some utopia where we get to stream every movie we want for next to nothing, I definitely never spent more than 25-30 bucks a month at Blockbuster.

Slower-speed plans don't exist anymore outside of dialup. I have a plan that's fast enough for streaming, but so slow that it's only available to people like me who were grandfathered in. A similar plan is available to people on welfare. So no, you can't factor in the cost of broadband into streaming.

No clue where you live, but around here you can get broadband plans as low as 10-15 mbps all the way up to 1 gbps, and all but the premium packages come with data caps, some as low as 25-50 gigs. You're not streaming much with that, one full weekend watching Netflix will chew through 50 gigs. So yes, the cost of broadband does figure into it.

I'm in a more-or-less Spectrum-only area. The slowest speed they offer to the general public is 200 mbps, so it doesn't factor into everyone's costs. I'm personally able to stream with my connection that I just pinged at about 21 mbps.

I'm feeling the desire to dive further down the research rabbit hole, if nothing else, to learn how badly Spectrum is farking us over. What company offers speeds as low as 10-15 mbps?

Frontier Communications

I should clarify, you get that speed with a business line in the country with Frontier, regardless of what plan you have.


Ugh, I need a drink; regardless of how much you're paying for said plan.
 
2021-02-02 8:17:18 PM  

AliceBToklasLives: Hmm. I live alone and since March I have streamed probably 10 movies a week plus sports plus work Zoom meetings plus everything I do working from home. Haven't come close to my data cap. And my provider is everyone's favorite business, Comcast.

Two caveats: (1) I live alone and multiple devices streaming at the same time do add up: (2) not a gamer, so none of that data usage.


I live alone too. My cap is 250 gig a month, which used to be plenty, but these days not so much. I went over in Jan by 33gb, and would have in Dec too if I hadn't checked my usage and stopped streaming the last week of the month. Streaming aside, web site are loaded with ads and autoplay video that are chewing up data at record pace. Have you noticed the non-stop autoplay video ad at the bottom of every Fark page now? I used to keep a tab open here all day, cant do that anymore with that constantly chewing up my data.
 
2021-02-02 8:39:50 PM  

Fireproof: I'm in a more-or-less Spectrum-only area. The slowest speed they offer to the general public is 200 mbps, so it doesn't factor into everyone's costs. I'm personally able to stream with my connection that I just pinged at about 21 mbps.

I'm feeling the desire to dive further down the research rabbit hole, if nothing else, to learn how badly Spectrum is farking us over. What company offers speeds as low as 10-15 mbps?


Around here we have one cable provider, Suddenlink, and they cover the whole city and some rural areas, we also have a fiberoptic company, Vexus, but they only cover about 15% of the city right now. Everyone else is still offering either the fiber-optic or regular broadband over the telephone network, so their max speed is pretty much capped at maybe 40-50 mbps for their top top plan, and go down from there.
 
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