Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Slash Gear)   The newest Mars Rover, "Perseverance" is set to land on Mars February 18th. Hot Wheels will release a toy version beforehand, so kids of every age can reenact the landing   (slashgear.com) divider line
    More: Cool, scale replica, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Hot Wheels, NASA, Mars Exploration Rover, Mars Science Laboratory, Space exploration, pays homage  
•       •       •

1925 clicks; posted to Main » and STEM » on 27 Jan 2021 at 11:16 PM (10 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

 
2021-01-27 11:49:29 PM  
4 votes:
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-01-27 11:22:14 PM  
4 votes:
If it's beforehand, wouldn't that just be enact the landing?
 
2021-01-28 10:36:20 AM  
3 votes:
Still got this set on my desk:
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-01-28 1:01:05 AM  
3 votes:
I'm just glad to be in before the Spirit Rover XKCD, that one always gives me a sad.

/and an amazing impression of the designers
//JPL seems amazing, I would love my kid to end up there (at 9 years old he loved The Martian, and likes math so maybe there's hope?)
 
2021-01-27 11:59:23 PM  
3 votes:
I feel the name Perseverance kinds of jinks the mission. How about "I got two days to operate" in Hebrew and then let it defy expectations.
/nothing can beat the GOAT Curiosity
upload.wikimedia.org Curiosity of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission by NASA, was launched November 26, 2011[13][14] and landed at the Aeolis Palus plain near Aeolis Mons (informally "Mount Sharp")[15][16][17][18] in Gale Crater on August 6, 2012.[19][20][21] The Curiosity rover is still operational as of January 2021.
 
2021-01-28 6:43:11 AM  
2 votes:
Fark user imageView Full Size


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-01-28 2:54:55 AM  
2 votes:

born_yesterday: Feet, not meters, kids.


May I just say as someone that has worked on software for converting between them... unit systems are freaking hard. Maybe not as hard as accurate local time, but still bloody hard.
 
2021-01-28 2:25:57 AM  
2 votes:

abhorrent1: [Fark user image 740x308]

/obscure?


All its' gotta do is drill?
 
2021-01-28 2:13:58 PM  
1 vote:
OptimisticCynicism:

And that article (review? dissertation? manifesto?) looks like a pretty entertaining read. Thanks
 
2021-01-28 11:01:36 AM  
1 vote:
Naming it Perseverance is kind of like telling a dancer good luck before a performance. Thing will be dead within a week if it makes it to the ground in one piece.
 
2021-01-28 9:00:48 AM  
1 vote:

Mudd's woman: OptimisticCynicism: born_yesterday: Feet, not meters, kids.

May I just say as someone that has worked on software for converting between them... unit systems are freaking hard. Maybe not as hard as accurate local time, but still bloody hard.

Forgive my ignorance but what exactly do you mean by that--
Like, you can never really know what time it is?
Serious question.


It's more a question of translating current/historical times between jurisdictions than it is a measurement problem.

Jurisdictions of course are an artificial human construct and how they treat time is both arbitrary and not consistent over time.

For a complex but hilarious read, I'd suggest https://zachholman.com/talk/utc-is-en​o​ugh-for-everyone-right

The TLDR though is that economic synchronizing, geopolitical changes, daylight savings policy, leap seconds, calendar migrations and such all impact how any moment in time is represented at the location a person might be. So handling all of that accurately is actually a huge coordinated effort that more or less means maintaining a database of time related events for every location on the planet.
 
2021-01-28 7:41:23 AM  
1 vote:

Mudd's woman: OptimisticCynicism: born_yesterday: Feet, not meters, kids.

May I just say as someone that has worked on software for converting between them... unit systems are freaking hard. Maybe not as hard as accurate local time, but still bloody hard.

Forgive my ignorance but what exactly do you mean by that--
Like, you can never really know what time it is?
Serious question.


If you've got a sextant, a horizon (natural or artificial), and a clear sky, you can accurately determine local noon.  Comparing that to Coordinated Universal Time will give you your longitude, and the altitude of the sun above the horizon (along with the date) will give you your latitude.
 
2021-01-27 11:36:10 PM  
1 vote:
Give my regards to the girl with the mousy hair.
 
2021-01-27 11:21:21 PM  
1 vote:
Fark user imageView Full Size


/obscure?
 
Displayed 14 of 14 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.