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(Axios)   It's a sad day on Sesame Street as Google announces an alternative to cookies   (axios.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Web browser, Google, introduced sweeping privacy changes, new test results, big deal, new API, web browser rivals Apple, Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine  
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785 clicks; posted to STEM » on 25 Jan 2021 at 12:11 PM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



10 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-01-25 10:26:44 AM  
"Trust us."
 
2021-01-25 11:02:48 AM  
"Anyone fancy a biscuit?"
 
2021-01-25 12:29:56 PM  

FkYouFkYouFkYou-WhosNext: "Anyone fancy a biscuit?"


No, biscotti. If you give it that European elan, nobody will care they somehow have something WORSE than 3rd party cookies.
 
2021-01-25 12:31:56 PM  
images-wixmp-ed30a86b8c4ca887773594c2.wixmp.comView Full Size
 
2021-01-25 12:45:56 PM  
Great, now I have to wait for a FLoC blocker or data anonymizer to protect my data, since cross-site scripting and cookies are already handled.

Why can't these companies leave our data alone? Advertisers and firms getting them data are a blight on society.
 
2021-01-25 1:02:33 PM  

Quantumbunny: Great, now I have to wait for a FLoC blocker or data anonymizer to protect my data, since cross-site scripting and cookies are already handled.

Why can't these companies leave our data alone? Advertisers and firms getting them data are a blight on society.


Can anyone who knows about FLoC explain how it's bad?   It sounds like a legit way to protect each individual's data while still allowing advertisers to reach their target audiences.

My issue with targeted advertising has always been about the required collection of my personal information that creates a profile of me that could be used for many other things besides legitimate advertising.   It seems like people here are against advertising in and of itself.

FLoC sounds to me like it's not all that different than current TV and radio advertising...advertisers select which shows to advertise on in large part based on the collective demographics of the audience of that show.  Granted, this looks at smaller pools of people than the collective nationwide viewers of a given show, but the principle seems the same.
 
2021-01-25 1:18:36 PM  
They just put the chip straight into your brain?
You agreed to it!

FLoC uses machine learning algorithms to analyze user data and then create a group of thousands of people based off of the sites that an individual visits. The data gathered locally from the browser is never shared. Instead, the data from the much wider cohort of thousands of people is shared, and that is then used to target ads.

So they aren't individually targeting you--it's just that they've found a way to make generalized data streams work even better at targeting you. So there's nothing wrong with being targeted, it's just that I don't want them to know my name. If they want to use my DNA to sell me better products, why would i complain? They're helping us.

That means that Facebook will become even more Facebookier, Fark will become even more snobby, and more selfie takers will die trying to take even better snapshots of themselves. But fine, whatever, as long as you keep showing me cool things to buy.
I love my FREEDOM.
 
2021-01-25 1:28:06 PM  

24601: Quantumbunny: Great, now I have to wait for a FLoC blocker or data anonymizer to protect my data, since cross-site scripting and cookies are already handled.

Why can't these companies leave our data alone? Advertisers and firms getting them data are a blight on society.

Can anyone who knows about FLoC explain how it's bad?   It sounds like a legit way to protect each individual's data while still allowing advertisers to reach their target audiences.

My issue with targeted advertising has always been about the required collection of my personal information that creates a profile of me that could be used for many other things besides legitimate advertising.   It seems like people here are against advertising in and of itself.

FLoC sounds to me like it's not all that different than current TV and radio advertising...advertisers select which shows to advertise on in large part based on the collective demographics of the audience of that show.  Granted, this looks at smaller pools of people than the collective nationwide viewers of a given show, but the principle seems the same.


They essentially build flocks based on your browser usage. By knowing which flocks you are in and anything like a browser fingerprint, user id, even IP address makes it worse than a cookie, since flocks are designed to be public, not just abused to be used across sites. Also, any mismanagement from a browser and it's all exposed.

It's also designed to be obtuse or transparent to the user so you aren't really supposed to be able to opt out of flocks.

Here's more detailed stuff from the EFF.

Google claiming companies will have 95% on the return from cookie aggregation means at least Google will still know WAY too much about you, even if they pinkie swear they won't pass it to advertisers. Google sells data and Google isn't immune to internal misuse or breach, so a lot of us would prefer to not have our data collected even if that is supposedly only in aggregate.
 
2021-01-25 2:04:21 PM  
Nothing coming from Google can be trusted when it comes to privacy. And it's not that they're all "evil" and whatnot, but simply that they have an immense confict of interest when it comes to advertizing.
 
2021-01-25 6:39:56 PM  
This is nothing more than a way to maintain their lead in the advertising world.

Fortunately, more of the people paying for the ads have figured out that all the fancy graphs they are getting about how they spend money isn't translating into sales.

The advertising business is about selling you an ad, not about selling your product.
 
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