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(YouTube)   So, subby bought a mouse sander as seen on YouTube videos to strip the seasoning off his Lodge cast iron pan - after further searching, I found a video showing someone doing the same thing with Easy Off oven cleaner. Anyone tried this?   (youtube.com) divider line
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534 clicks; posted to Food » on 24 Jan 2021 at 2:14 PM (12 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



Voting Results (Smartest)
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2021-01-24 10:28:02 AM  
38 votes:
Using something like Easy Off on a porous surface like cast iron makes me wince.

Easy Off has more than just Sodium Hydroxide in it, and some of the other ingredients are moderately toxic (rather than just caustic). I'd assume most of the ingredients are fairly volatile, and will simple evaporate away, but my concern would be that residue left deep in the pores will be leached back to the surface when you reintroduce oil.
 
2021-01-24 11:16:23 AM  
33 votes:

arrogantbastich: The only cleaning mine get is the occasional boiling water to get some persistent bits off with just lightly scraping it with a fork. The only time we actually reseasoned a pan was when we had some idiot (FIL!) wash it with dishsoap. We didn't want to refinish it because it was super smooth. Just a mild abrasive sponge and lots of steam.


Dish soap can't hurt the seasoning. People think this because the seasoning is made from oil or fat, which can be dissolved in detergent, but the high heat has broken down the fat and reformed it into a polymer that is essentially a kind of plastic that can't be dissolved in soapy water. The real enemy is mechanical abrasion. Soap or no soap, scrubbing too hard will wear through the polymer.
 
2021-01-24 10:06:47 AM  
21 votes:
Well to remove seasoning, just out it in the oven in the self cleaning mode. It'll cook off.

If you want an incredible pan though, sand through the grits to a mirror finish. Then season.

In the old days cast pans didn't come with a very smooth finish, so they'd surface them smooth.

Today, casting a lot better and they don't bother post finishing. So a pan from 1880 might be smoother than a new pan today.

I also like to use beef suet for seasoning.
 
2021-01-24 10:21:33 AM  
19 votes:
Lodge now pre seasons their pans.  I don't know why you would want to remove it.  I've got pans that are over 70 years old and have never been unseasoned.
 
2021-01-24 10:13:13 AM  
18 votes:
Also, I don't know why the guy bothered with stripping the whole pan...bottom outside, handle, etc. since you're only interested in the cooking surface.
 
2021-01-24 11:41:32 AM  
13 votes:
As an old southern woman, I'm shocked, shocked I tell you that anyone would even consider doing this to a seasoned pan. It's heresy, pure and simple.
 
2021-01-24 10:25:04 AM  
13 votes:

Marcus Aurelius: 1. Turn gas grill onto HIGH.
2. Throw in the cast iron.
3. Drink 2 beers.
4. Turn off gas grill.

My method is clearly superior.


Would 3 beers also work, just for safety and to allow for different drinking speeds?
 
2021-01-24 10:23:47 AM  
11 votes:
1. Turn gas grill onto HIGH.
2. Throw in the cast iron.
3. Drink 2 beers.
4. Turn off gas grill.

My method is clearly superior.
 
2021-01-24 5:16:29 PM  
10 votes:
I've never seen such monthly overthinking about cast iron pans. Must be like there is a news void...


Psychopompous: [Fark user image 850x850]
A cup wire brush like this one will cost you 5$ and will remove rust and seasoning from cast iron w/o removing any metal. It won't smooth out surfaces like sandpaper, but will last indefinitely. Chuck one into an angle grinder or high speed drill. If you are going to get into collecting rusty flea market cast iron, beg, borrow or steal a drill press to chuck it into, so you can hold the rusty pan with both hands.


NO.
As a machinist with decades of experience, no.
Think you are stronger than a 1/4 hp drill press? Got bad news for you...
The drill press has a platen or table... use it. The quill down feed in one hand, the pan in the other.
I'd throw you out of the shop if you kept doing otherwise, because I don't want to talk to OSHA about you.
 
2021-01-24 10:29:46 AM  
10 votes:

rukie: Well to remove seasoning, just out it in the oven in the self cleaning mode. It'll cook off.

If you want an incredible pan though, sand through the grits to a mirror finish. Then season.

In the old days cast pans didn't come with a very smooth finish, so they'd surface them smooth.

Today, casting a lot better and they don't bother post finishing. So a pan from 1880 might be smoother than a new pan today.

I also like to use beef suet for seasoning.


Agreed with the above.  The sanding isn't to remove the seasoning, it's to do a proper finishing of the cast iron itself.  Get it to a mirror finish with the sander and reseason and it'll be as good or better than a teflon pan.

Think of it like resurfacing a brake disk.  You can scrub it with cleaner all you want, but unless you grind it down to a better finish, it's not going to be where you want it.
 
2021-01-24 10:28:42 AM  
10 votes:
I agree with the Boobies. If you have a self cleaning electric over use the self clean cycle there. 100% clean with no effort.

I also agree that a smooth surface is best. I hate the new pebbled pans they sell. I was fortunate enough to inherit by mother in law's ancient iron. On those the inside has been machined to a VERY flat and NOTHING sticks to then once seasoned.
 
2021-01-24 2:17:00 PM  
9 votes:

optikeye: I think in this subby's case it's to deal with a very rusted pan


Citric acid, one tablespoon per liter. Water as hot as you can stand. Wash the rusty thing with wrm soapy water, scrub off any loose rust, then soak in the rusty thing in the acid solution for a couple hours, swirling a few times. Rust is gone. Doesn't damage the iron or weaken it. It's also completely non-toxic.

Old trick for restoring rusted handplanes and chisels.
 
2021-01-24 12:32:38 PM  
9 votes:
People over think cast iron plans. Sure, make sure to prepare and season it when you get it. Use it.  Love it. Heat it on a stove with a wipe of oil after you've washed it. Put it away when it's cool.
 
2021-01-24 11:27:24 AM  
9 votes:

Ambivalence: Save the easy off for your steel sheet pans.


And NOT the aluminum pans.
 
2021-01-24 3:15:19 PM  
8 votes:
UPDATE: holy crow, that was easy...10 min with the sander, brought the pebbly surface down to smooth as silk. 5 min with the 80 grit, 5 min with the 180. Time to reseason!

Clarification - it wasn't the Lodge preseasoning I was objecting to, it was the casting method of leaving a rough surface, which makes food stick. Maybe now I can chuck my teflon pans I keep buying over and over.
 
2021-01-24 11:08:56 AM  
8 votes:

SpectroBoy: I agree with the Boobies.


Don't we all?
 
2021-01-24 4:06:05 PM  
7 votes:

Gough: gopher321: UPDATE: holy crow, that was easy...10 min with the sander, brought the pebbly surface down to smooth as silk. 5 min with the 80 grit, 5 min with the 180. Time to reseason!

Clarification - it wasn't the Lodge preseasoning I was objecting to, it was the casting method of leaving a rough surface, which makes food stick. Maybe now I can chuck my teflon pans I keep buying over and over.

Stopping at 180 grit, what kind of crazy talk is that?  Time to up your game, at least take it up to 8000 grit.

https://taytools.com/collections/suppl​ies-abrasives-3m-lapping-microfinishin​g-film-polishing-paper/products/3m-281​q-wetordry-6-piece-set


This guy uses 30,000.

ゼリーは包丁になりますか?
Youtube Oadf4KNYz-I
 
2021-01-24 11:59:44 AM  
7 votes:
Don't buy Lodge cast iron. It's crap.

Browse some antique stores or go to EBay/Etsy and find some pre-1940s cast iron. Griswold and Wagner are both great; older pans have a ring and number. They are lighter weight for everyday use (go figure), and the surfaces are so smooth that bad seasoning can be gently scrubbed off with steel wool and re-done. I've rehabbed three now, and I don't use anything else.

Even if the surfaces are pitted and imperfect, they hold seasoning beautifully. You can see your reflection.
 
2021-01-24 2:35:19 PM  
6 votes:

Squid_for_Brains: Don't buy Lodge cast iron. It's crap.

Browse some antique stores or go to EBay/Etsy and find some pre-1940s cast iron. Griswold and Wagner are both great; older pans have a ring and number. They are lighter weight for everyday use (go figure), and the surfaces are so smooth that bad seasoning can be gently scrubbed off with steel wool and re-done. I've rehabbed three now, and I don't use anything else.

Even if the surfaces are pitted and imperfect, they hold seasoning beautifully. You can see your reflection.


100% agreed. I have a sweet collection of OLD cast iron. Griswolds are my personal favorite. They are very very smooth.
Word of warning, do NOT drop a hot cast Iron pan. My ex wife dropped my 14 1/2" Griswold...it shattered. It took me 10 years but i finally found a replacement. It was an old "barn find" for $2. Took a lot of elbow grease but it is now fully restored.
 
2021-01-24 10:25:47 AM  
6 votes:
Why are you removing it? If you need to, the self-cleaning mode as said above is a very easy way to do it.
Re-season with flax-seed oil in the oven at 400.
 
2021-01-25 1:03:10 PM  
5 votes:

EdwardTellerhands: pheelix: EdwardTellerhands: ...About 5 years ago cast iron  collecting turned into a hobby for me. I come across a lot of high quality mid-20th Century unmarked American made cast iron when I'm hunting for the rarer stuff. If it's under $10 and isn't warped, pitted, or cracked I buy it no matter what. They're the ones I'll clean, season, and give to a relative or friend who says "I've always wanted to try cooking on cast iron".

Well, that's you, though. There are people who buy new Lodge skillets and resurface them, for whatever reason. Maybe they don't like having "used" stuff; who knows?


I'll gladly admit to buying new iron and resurfacing it.

Turns out I didn't have any iron griddles for my grill.  It's a big surface, so big griddles seemed necessary.  Found a couple of cheap Chinese 17" x 17" griddles online.

Iron's iron, so we're off to a good start.

But the surface was absolute ass.  Neat thing about liking to cook AND building race cars, there's a knee mill in the shop.

20 minutes later, they're perfectly smooth.  Fly cutters and polishing pads for the win.

After seasoning, they're like glass.  Might have overshot the goal.  Now I have to chase eggs around with the spatula 'cause they don't stick at all.
 
2021-01-24 9:45:44 PM  
5 votes:

Peter von Nostrand: Why are you removing the f'n seasoning only to re-season it? Are you f'n people that dumb?


Have you never come across cast iron that was so farked up it had to be redone from scratch, whether from misuse/neglect or from a crappy factory?  Also, the out-of-the-factory lodge "seasoning" sucks donkey nuts.
 
2021-01-24 5:25:40 PM  
5 votes:

Gough: Mister Peejay: Gough: gopher321: UPDATE: holy crow, that was easy...10 min with the sander, brought the pebbly surface down to smooth as silk. 5 min with the 80 grit, 5 min with the 180. Time to reseason!

Clarification - it wasn't the Lodge preseasoning I was objecting to, it was the casting method of leaving a rough surface, which makes food stick. Maybe now I can chuck my teflon pans I keep buying over and over.

Stopping at 180 grit, what kind of crazy talk is that?  Time to up your game, at least take it up to 8000 grit.

https://taytools.com/collections/suppl​ies-abrasives-3m-lapping-microfinishin​g-film-polishing-paper/products/3m-281​q-wetordry-6-piece-set

This guy uses 30,000.

[YouTube video: ゼリーは包丁になりますか?]

TIL that 3M makes a 500,000 grit "lapping" paper.  I guess that must be to get rid of the scratches left from the 100,000 grit.


My finishing stones are 8,000 and 10,000 and I consider that overdone. *shrug*
(have machined optics)
 
2021-01-24 3:11:51 PM  
5 votes:

revrendjim: The real enemy is mechanical abrasion. Soap or no soap, scrubbing too hard will wear through the polymer.


Also, this. I can't understand why people say that using course salt to scrub a pan is fine, but mild soap isn't.
 
2021-01-24 3:16:36 PM  
4 votes:

tintar: khitsicker: wire wheel on your angle grinder works just as well.

Psychopompous: [Fark user image 850x850]
A cup wire brush like this one will cost you 5$ and will remove rust and seasoning from cast iron w/o removing any metal. It won't smooth out surfaces like sandpaper, but will last indefinitely. Chuck one into an angle grinder or high speed drill. If you are going to get into collecting rusty flea market cast iron, beg, borrow or steal a drill press to chuck it into, so you can hold the rusty pan with both hands.

just... (I know, I know, it's softer therefore less-effective) ...but still, consider the brass brushes not iron or steel.

little tiny shards of that shiat will break off, and if a microscopic piece gets embedded in whatever you're workin' on (pan, car, bicycle, ...) - it WILL later interact with the metal to rust up a farking storm.

/also with brass there's less chance you will fark the thing up, lol
//or yourself either, lol
///also? safety-glasses, kids, safety glasses. This Is The Way.


Here's our family's horror story:
My grandmother passed down all her cast iron to my mom, who took great care of it and taught us how to as well. My sister and I were supposed to get it all when she died.

Mom got when she was 85, almost died, was in the hospital for weeks and weeks.

Dad thought she was never coming home, so he gave all 8 cast iron skillets and cornbread pans to somebody. Never found out who, probably took them to Goodwill.

We never forgave him for it. What a dick.
 
2021-01-24 2:53:08 PM  
4 votes:

phlegmjay: rosekolodny: SpectroBoy: I agree with the Boobies. If you have a self cleaning electric over use the self clean cycle there. 100% clean with no effort.

I also agree that a smooth surface is best. I hate the new pebbled pans they sell. I was fortunate enough to inherit by mother in law's ancient iron. On those the inside has been machined to a VERY flat and NOTHING sticks to then once seasoned.

I have my late FIL's chicken frying skillet that he inherited from his mother.  Slick as snot on a frozen doorknob.

If my house caught fire, I would grab it.

I'm pretty sure it would survive the blaze. Better to focus on saving the beer.


If you go that route, just make sure NOT to call the Fire Department, the water from the firehoses will crack the hot cast iron.
 
2021-01-24 2:51:10 PM  
4 votes:

khitsicker: wire wheel on your angle grinder works just as well.


Psychopompous: [Fark user image 850x850]
A cup wire brush like this one will cost you 5$ and will remove rust and seasoning from cast iron w/o removing any metal. It won't smooth out surfaces like sandpaper, but will last indefinitely. Chuck one into an angle grinder or high speed drill. If you are going to get into collecting rusty flea market cast iron, beg, borrow or steal a drill press to chuck it into, so you can hold the rusty pan with both hands.


just... (I know, I know, it's softer therefore less-effective) ...but still, consider the brass brushes not iron or steel.

little tiny shards of that shiat will break off, and if a microscopic piece gets embedded in whatever you're workin' on (pan, car, bicycle, ...) - it WILL later interact with the metal to rust up a farking storm.

/also with brass there's less chance you will fark the thing up, lol
//or yourself either, lol
///also? safety-glasses, kids, safety glasses. This Is The Way.
 
2021-01-24 2:38:18 PM  
4 votes:

SpectroBoy: I agree with the Boobies. If you have a self cleaning electric over use the self clean cycle there. 100% clean with no effort.

I also agree that a smooth surface is best. I hate the new pebbled pans they sell. I was fortunate enough to inherit by mother in law's ancient iron. On those the inside has been machined to a VERY flat and NOTHING sticks to then once seasoned.


I have my late FIL's chicken frying skillet that he inherited from his mother.  Slick as snot on a frozen doorknob.

If my house caught fire, I would grab it.
 
2021-01-24 2:30:54 PM  
4 votes:

riffraff: Why are you removing it? If you need to, the self-cleaning mode as said above is a very easy way to do it.
Re-season with flax-seed oil in the oven at 400.


Flax seed can lead to layers of seasoning that flake off. I know this from experience, as I seasoned all of my pans with flax seed oil after likely reading about it from the same source you did. Some of them stayed fine. Others flaked a little. And one flaked a lot. Better to go with canola or other neutral oil.
 
2021-01-24 12:35:21 PM  
4 votes:

Gubbo: Marcus Aurelius: 1. Turn gas grill onto HIGH.
2. Throw in the cast iron.
3. Drink 2 beers.
4. Turn off gas grill.

My method is clearly superior.

Would 3 beers also work, just for safety and to allow for different drinking speeds?



But is five minutes really long enough?
 
2021-01-25 12:50:28 PM  
3 votes:

CheekyMonkey: T Baggins: I've read that you can destroy the seasoning on a cast iron pan by leaving it out for shiatty roommates to use. They'll simmer an acidic tomato sauce to partially dissolve the seasoning, then soak it overnight to coat it with rust.

Sure is a lot of nonsense in this thread.

https://www.seriouseats.com/2014/11/th​e-truth-about-cast-iron.html


"No matter how well you season, there's still a good chance that there are spots of bare metal and these can indeed interact with acidic ingredients in your food.
For this reason, it's a good idea to avoid long-simmered acidic things, particularly tomato sauce."

"Don't let it stay wet. Water is the natural enemy of iron and letting even a drop of water sit in your pan when you put it away can lead to a rust spot."

where's the nonsense?
 
2021-01-24 10:32:15 PM  
3 votes:
The 2nd time you use a cast iron skillet, you know all there is to know about how to use it. From the anxiety here you'd imagine it was like handling a time machine or a slot car.
 
2021-01-24 10:13:14 PM  
3 votes:

zeroflight222: pheelix: Please explain. I've never had a problem with a Lodge pan that simply cooking with it didn't solve.

Their seasoning only protects the metal & doesn't do the other aspects of a good seasoning, like being non-stick (or close to).  For many, that's goo enough, and many even swear by it.  But for many others it's a quick & dirty layer that's not done properly.   Those generally either strip it off or at least down a few levels and redo.  You can get past it after a lot of cooking, but if people are willing to put in the effort they can get a much better layer themselves.


Some folks simply prefer a smoother surface than what you get on newish Lodge stuff, thus the Metal Shop antics. I've never detected a diff, but this is normally  the kinda thing I get OCD about, so I won't throw stones.
 
2021-01-24 8:15:58 PM  
3 votes:

arrogantbastich: The only cleaning mine get is the occasional boiling water to get some persistent bits off with just lightly scraping it with a fork. The only time we actually reseasoned a pan was when we had some idiot (FIL!) wash it with dishsoap. We didn't want to refinish it because it was super smooth. Just a mild abrasive sponge and lots of steam.


Dish soap will not damage seasoning, there is no lye in soap anymore so you can use soap on the pans.
 
2021-01-24 6:11:39 PM  
3 votes:

tintar: as Bajtaur noted... easy off is some very, very, very nasty stuff. I only ever use it on the stovetop gratings... outside. with a hose before they come back inside. also the grass dies for half a year. that stuff is skeery.

gopher321: Amazon had a sale on a cheap mouse sander for $30, so I thought Why not? I don't know if this Easy Off in a garbage bag is an easier/better method though.

I had to scrooble what a mouse sander even is!!!

eh, for 30 bucks I'd just get a cheap sonic screwdriver what can do not only that same thing, but like seventeen other things as well - https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/​B003H054RY/

[Fark user image 850x541]


/trust me, you will suddenly find yourself sawing thru' things you somehow never realized needed sawin'-thru'
//this one only has 2 modes: 'off' (aka 'lurking...') - and - 'SONIC!!!'
///eh, suffices


Those are useful gadgets, but I wouldn't use it (or a mouse sander) on a skillet. A disc/orbital sander would get into corners without leaving weird pointy depressions.
 
2021-01-24 4:55:53 PM  
3 votes:

millia: The next pan I want to do I want to do with the electrolysis stripping, because a) chemistry is fun and b) REALLY clean pans.


Don't. Just don't. Not unless you want incredibly brittle pans that'll crack on you.

Electrolysis, unless you know exactly what you're doing and have a setup that has fine control will introduce a shiatload of hydrogen into the metal and fark up the crystalline structure. It's not terribly important in stuff that isn't going to be temperature stressed, but for something that is, like pans or blades that need re-tempering, it is a very, very bad thing.
 
2021-01-24 3:45:11 PM  
3 votes:
I just use the sandblaster at work, then re-season with lard.
 
2021-01-24 3:26:27 PM  
3 votes:

tintar: khitsicker: wire wheel on your angle grinder works just as well.

Psychopompous: [Fark user image 850x850]
A cup wire brush like this one will cost you 5$ and will remove rust and seasoning from cast iron w/o removing any metal. It won't smooth out surfaces like sandpaper, but will last indefinitely. Chuck one into an angle grinder or high speed drill. If you are going to get into collecting rusty flea market cast iron, beg, borrow or steal a drill press to chuck it into, so you can hold the rusty pan with both hands.

just... (I know, I know, it's softer therefore less-effective) ...but still, consider the brass brushes not iron or steel.

little tiny shards of that shiat will break off, and if a microscopic piece gets embedded in whatever you're workin' on (pan, car, bicycle, ...) - it WILL later interact with the metal to rust up a farking storm.

/also with brass there's less chance you will fark the thing up, lol
//or yourself either, lol
///also? safety-glasses, kids, safety glasses. This Is The Way.


No, I'm sorry, but I tried a brass brush on cast iron and it leaves a brassy film on the metal. Brass cookware has to be sealed in tin before cooking in it, so it follows that smearing brass on a cooking surface is bad. Just clean thoroughly before seasoning. The steel wire is softer than cast iron, so you really can't screw up the surface of the cast iron. It leaves a lovely burnished finish, while preserving the texture from the sand casting.  Definitely follow shop safety protocols. Goggles, dust mask, gloves, and a shirt you don't mind getting filthy with rust dust. I buy cast iron pans and decorative cast iron at flea markets and estate sales and fix them up on a regular basis.
 
2021-01-24 2:47:04 PM  
3 votes:

tintar: phlegmjay: riffraff: Why are you removing it? If you need to, the self-cleaning mode as said above is a very easy way to do it.
Re-season with flax-seed oil in the oven at 400.

Flax seed can lead to layers of seasoning that flake off. I know this from experience, as I seasoned all of my pans with flax seed oil after likely reading about it from the same source you did. Some of them stayed fine. Others flaked a little. And one flaked a lot. Better to go with canola or other neutral oil.

huh, tyty for that tidbit! I never buy the stuff 'cos it's always so dingdanged espensivo, but I've wanted to.

generally I just use grapeseed oil when I can find that stuff on sale.

the flaxseed itself (whole or powder, dealer's choice) is useful, though, to keep around as an emergency egg-substitute in a pinch. not because I am a vegulon (I mean, I am, but... I eat eggs, love eggs...) - but because sometimes you accidentally ran out of eggs (I know, I know, I am a monster. an abomination. pro-tip: never run out of eggs.)


WHAT KIND OF MONSTER RUNS OUT OF EGGS?
 
2021-01-24 2:43:11 PM  
3 votes:

phlegmjay: riffraff: Why are you removing it? If you need to, the self-cleaning mode as said above is a very easy way to do it.
Re-season with flax-seed oil in the oven at 400.

Flax seed can lead to layers of seasoning that flake off. I know this from experience, as I seasoned all of my pans with flax seed oil after likely reading about it from the same source you did. Some of them stayed fine. Others flaked a little. And one flaked a lot. Better to go with canola or other neutral oil.


huh, tyty for that tidbit! I never buy the stuff 'cos it's always so dingdanged espensivo, but I've wanted to.

generally I just use grapeseed oil when I can find that stuff on sale.

the flaxseed itself (whole or powder, dealer's choice) is useful, though, to keep around as an emergency egg-substitute in a pinch. not because I am a vegulon (I mean, I am, but... I eat eggs, love eggs...) - but because sometimes you accidentally ran out of eggs (I know, I know, I am a monster. an abomination. pro-tip: never run out of eggs.)
 
2021-01-24 2:42:47 PM  
3 votes:

rosekolodny: SpectroBoy: I agree with the Boobies. If you have a self cleaning electric over use the self clean cycle there. 100% clean with no effort.

I also agree that a smooth surface is best. I hate the new pebbled pans they sell. I was fortunate enough to inherit by mother in law's ancient iron. On those the inside has been machined to a VERY flat and NOTHING sticks to then once seasoned.

I have my late FIL's chicken frying skillet that he inherited from his mother.  Slick as snot on a frozen doorknob.

If my house caught fire, I would grab it.


I'm pretty sure it would survive the blaze. Better to focus on saving the beer.
 
2021-01-24 2:35:14 PM  
3 votes:

oldernell: Lodge now pre seasons their pans.  I don't know why you would want to remove it.  I've got pans that are over 70 years old and have never been unseasoned.


Sometimes something will happen to the seasoning in a spot or the pan will rust. In such cases people might want to take all the seasoning off and start over so that they can apply it evenly over the whole pan.

/ And, of course, there's the sanding the base metal to make it smooth thing that others are talking about. I've never done that because I don't have a sander or angle grinder. I have heard some dissenting voices that say the pebbled surface is better, but this is something I've wanted to try.
 
2021-01-24 2:33:56 PM  
3 votes:
as 

Bajtaur noted... easy off is some very, very, very nasty stuff. I only ever use it on the stovetop gratings... outside. with a hose before they come back inside. also the grass dies for half a year. that stuff is skeery.

gopher321: Amazon had a sale on a cheap mouse sander for $30, so I thought Why not? I don't know if this Easy Off in a garbage bag is an easier/better method though.


I had to scrooble what a mouse sander even is!!!

eh, for 30 bucks I'd just get a cheap sonic screwdriver what can do not only that same thing, but like seventeen other things as well - https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product​/B0​03H054RY/

Fark user imageView Full Size



/trust me, you will suddenly find yourself sawing thru' things you somehow never realized needed sawin'-thru'
//this one only has 2 modes: 'off' (aka 'lurking...') - and - 'SONIC!!!'
///eh, suffices
 
2021-01-24 11:25:38 AM  
3 votes:
I never sand mice, it pisses them off.
 
2021-01-24 10:49:51 AM  
3 votes:

oldernell: Lodge now pre seasons their pans.  I don't know why you would want to remove it.  I've got pans that are over 70 years old and have never been unseasoned.


Unfortunately their pans are not very smooth, though.  The point is to sand them smooth, then re-season. It doesn't take much work to do this, but it makes lightyears of difference to the cooking surface.
 
2021-01-24 10:26:13 AM  
3 votes:

oldernell: Lodge now pre seasons their pans.


Yes, that's the point.
 
2021-01-25 10:31:03 PM  
2 votes:

Percise1: rohar: EdwardTellerhands: pheelix: EdwardTellerhands: ...About 5 years ago cast iron  collecting turned into a hobby for me. I come across a lot of high quality mid-20th Century unmarked American made cast iron when I'm hunting for the rarer stuff. If it's under $10 and isn't warped, pitted, or cracked I buy it no matter what. They're the ones I'll clean, season, and give to a relative or friend who says "I've always wanted to try cooking on cast iron".

Well, that's you, though. There are people who buy new Lodge skillets and resurface them, for whatever reason. Maybe they don't like having "used" stuff; who knows?

I'll gladly admit to buying new iron and resurfacing it.

Turns out I didn't have any iron griddles for my grill.  It's a big surface, so big griddles seemed necessary.  Found a couple of cheap Chinese 17" x 17" griddles online.

Iron's iron, so we're off to a good start.

But the surface was absolute ass.  Neat thing about liking to cook AND building race cars, there's a knee mill in the shop.

20 minutes later, they're perfectly smooth.  Fly cutters and polishing pads for the win.

After seasoning, they're like glass.  Might have overshot the goal.  Now I have to chase eggs around with the spatula 'cause they don't stick at all.

Using a fly cutter on a cast iron pan? *blink*


Uh, it's a 17" x 17" iron plate.  I don't have all day to fiddle fart around with a 3/4" end mill.  Toss a fly cutter in the mill at about 12 degrees sr and burn a quarter mil off.

Then buff until bored.

Rudimentary, sure.  But it gets the job done quickly and safely.
 
2021-01-25 2:16:36 PM  
2 votes:

rohar: EdwardTellerhands: pheelix: EdwardTellerhands: ...About 5 years ago cast iron  collecting turned into a hobby for me. I come across a lot of high quality mid-20th Century unmarked American made cast iron when I'm hunting for the rarer stuff. If it's under $10 and isn't warped, pitted, or cracked I buy it no matter what. They're the ones I'll clean, season, and give to a relative or friend who says "I've always wanted to try cooking on cast iron".

Well, that's you, though. There are people who buy new Lodge skillets and resurface them, for whatever reason. Maybe they don't like having "used" stuff; who knows?

I'll gladly admit to buying new iron and resurfacing it.

Turns out I didn't have any iron griddles for my grill.  It's a big surface, so big griddles seemed necessary.  Found a couple of cheap Chinese 17" x 17" griddles online.

Iron's iron, so we're off to a good start.

But the surface was absolute ass.  Neat thing about liking to cook AND building race cars, there's a knee mill in the shop.

20 minutes later, they're perfectly smooth.  Fly cutters and polishing pads for the win.

After seasoning, they're like glass.  Might have overshot the goal.  Now I have to chase eggs around with the spatula 'cause they don't stick at all.


Now THAT I can see doing! It's the same way Wagner and Griswold did theirs back in the first half of the 20th century.
 
2021-01-25 2:13:03 PM  
2 votes:

phlegmjay: CheekyMonkey: T Baggins: I've read that you can destroy the seasoning on a cast iron pan by leaving it out for shiatty roommates to use. They'll simmer an acidic tomato sauce to partially dissolve the seasoning, then soak it overnight to coat it with rust.

Sure is a lot of nonsense in this thread.

https://www.seriouseats.com/2014/11/th​e-truth-about-cast-iron.html

http://sherylcanter.com/wordpress/2010​/01/a-science-based-technique-for-seas​oning-cast-iron/

I'd caution people against using flaxseed oil, As Canter recommends. As does your first source, Serious Eats. Many, many people have used flaxseed oil only to have it flake off with repeated use. After reading Canter's article, I seasoned all of my cast iron (about 5 pieces) with flaxseed oil (and yes, I got the good stuff that is super expensive and requires refrigeration). Some of it is still in tact, years later. But other pieces flaked, some just a little bit some a lot. Ultimately, the ones seasoned with flaxseed aren't much or any better than ones I've seasoned with canola oil. So I'd recommend the cheaper oil.


Personally, I've never had a problem with flaxseed oil.  I cook every day with cast iron and it's seasoned according to the Canter link.  None has ever flaked off.  I don't "baby" it, either.  It gets cleaned with a Scotchbrite pad and soap, same as all the other dishes.  I cook acidic things it it, including long braises with tomato-based sauces.  *At least* once a week, a dirty cast-iron skillet gets left in the sink, full of water, until the next morning because I'm too lazy to wash it after dinner.

There is never any rust from that last bit of heresy, because the multi-layer polymerized flaxseed coating is rock-solid and all over.

I do have 2 non-enameled cast iron Dutch ovens which are, at this point, unseasoned, because I use them for baking bread in, and cooking in my fireplace, and no matter what oil one uses, it isn't going to survive at 550F oven, or hanging over a wood fire.

The cost of flaxseed oil doesn't really concern me, as seasoning cast iron uses so little.  Plus, I carve wooden spoons and other cooking utensils, and have switched to protecting them with flaxseed oil as well.  Multiple coats, cured in a 170F toaster over for 1 hour per coat, protects wooden utensils far better than anything else I've tried.
 
2021-01-25 1:16:18 PM  
2 votes:

CheekyMonkey: T Baggins: I've read that you can destroy the seasoning on a cast iron pan by leaving it out for shiatty roommates to use. They'll simmer an acidic tomato sauce to partially dissolve the seasoning, then soak it overnight to coat it with rust.

Sure is a lot of nonsense in this thread.

https://www.seriouseats.com/2014/11/th​e-truth-about-cast-iron.html

http://sherylcanter.com/wordpress/2010​/01/a-science-based-technique-for-seas​oning-cast-iron/


I'd caution people against using flaxseed oil, As Canter recommends. As does your first source, Serious Eats. Many, many people have used flaxseed oil only to have it flake off with repeated use. After reading Canter's article, I seasoned all of my cast iron (about 5 pieces) with flaxseed oil (and yes, I got the good stuff that is super expensive and requires refrigeration). Some of it is still in tact, years later. But other pieces flaked, some just a little bit some a lot. Ultimately, the ones seasoned with flaxseed aren't much or any better than ones I've seasoned with canola oil. So I'd recommend the cheaper oil.
 
2021-01-25 12:36:01 PM  
2 votes:

T Baggins: I've read that you can destroy the seasoning on a cast iron pan by leaving it out for shiatty roommates to use. They'll simmer an acidic tomato sauce to partially dissolve the seasoning, then soak it overnight to coat it with rust.


Sure is a lot of nonsense in this thread.

https://www.seriouseats.com/2014/11/t​h​e-truth-about-cast-iron.html

http://sherylcanter.com/wordpress/201​0​/01/a-science-based-technique-for-seas​oning-cast-iron/
 
2021-01-25 8:25:44 AM  
2 votes:
Throw it in the fire pit for a few hours the coals will strip it. Sand it to fine then use a high temp oil to reseason.
 
2021-01-25 6:17:17 AM  
2 votes:
My Teflon coated pans cook just fine except for the twenty year old ones. My recent-vintage Lodge and the All Clads I inherited from my parents do too. Yes, even when I cook Big Manly Slabs of Real Meat. There comes a point where it stops being about cooking and turns into performative consumption.
 
2021-01-25 1:38:57 AM  
2 votes:

EdwardTellerhands: It's not an either/or deal for some people. There's cast-iron collectors who like having multiple sizes, etc., and out of curiosity or boredom don't mind buying a Lodge and going to those pains to prep a new skillet. There's hordes of these folks on YouTube. I'm lazy so I haven't gone to that sorta effort, but I've given away seasoned pans to friends and my kids.


I... kind of really, really want to leave my pans to the niece and nephews. except for the part where they are all dumbasses.
 
2021-01-25 1:28:56 AM  
2 votes:

pheelix: EdwardTellerhands: zeroflight222: pheelix: Please explain. I've never had a problem with a Lodge pan that simply cooking with it didn't solve.

Their seasoning only protects the metal & doesn't do the other aspects of a good seasoning, like being non-stick (or close to).  For many, that's goo enough, and many even swear by it.  But for many others it's a quick & dirty layer that's not done properly.   Those generally either strip it off or at least down a few levels and redo.  You can get past it after a lot of cooking, but if people are willing to put in the effort they can get a much better layer themselves.

Some folks simply prefer a smoother surface than what you get on newish Lodge stuff, thus the Metal Shop antics. I've never detected a diff, but this is normally  the kinda thing I get OCD about, so I won't throw stones.

At that point it's easier (and better) to head out to an antique mall or flea market and pick up a mid-20th century cast iron pan. I often see unmarked ones for less than $20.


It's not an either/or deal for some people. There's cast-iron collectors who like having multiple sizes, etc., and out of curiosity or boredom don't mind buying a Lodge and going to those pains to prep a new skillet. There's hordes of these folks on YouTube. I'm lazy so I haven't gone to that sorta effort, but I've given away seasoned pans to friends and my kids.
 
2021-01-24 9:04:47 PM  
2 votes:
Just reverse seared a ribeye for the first time and wiped the pan clean with a paper towel, so I'm getting a kick out of the replies.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-01-24 9:02:29 PM  
2 votes:

SoupGuru: People over think cast iron plans.


Good Lord, this.
 
2021-01-24 8:32:16 PM  
2 votes:

Xcott: I used to sous-vide steak, and it's still convenient when you're grilling for 20-40 people, but when grilling over charcoal I'd rather have the steak over the coals for as long as possible rather than sitting in a bag.

But yes, it all involves extra garage beers.  Or as Roast Beef would say, much crispy Stellas.  That golden action is so crunchy.  One more reason to use actual fire rather than simulating it with a pan that must then be carefully groomed.


Then you close the circle by using bacon to sear your steak.
Flaming Bacon Lance of Death, from Theo Gray's book "Mad Science"
Youtube w9dskxN10N0
 
2021-01-24 6:36:36 PM  
2 votes:

tintar: EdwardTellerhands: Those are useful gadgets, but I wouldn't use it (or a mouse sander) on a skillet. A disc/orbital sander would get into corners without leaving weird pointy depressions.

agreed. I mean, I've never had a pan I had/or-needed-to the slightest inclination of ever taking a sander to, but yeah, an orbital does make so much more sense for the shape.

I've actually yet to ever use the pointy sander of the sonic screwdriver - the stuff I need to pare down has always been like doors and door-frames, so I just get sanding sponges from dollar tree, lol.


They're excellent for grout and cutting wood or metal flush with adjoining pieces, but meh for sanding. One of two things (or both) happens: The sandpaper creeps back from the tip and shreds or you put too much pressure on the front and create the aforesaid depressions. The weight and shape of the thing just makes precision and evenness impossible for areas larger than an inch or two.
 
2021-01-24 5:02:03 PM  
2 votes:

Gough: Mister Peejay: Gough: gopher321: UPDATE: holy crow, that was easy...10 min with the sander, brought the pebbly surface down to smooth as silk. 5 min with the 80 grit, 5 min with the 180. Time to reseason!

Clarification - it wasn't the Lodge preseasoning I was objecting to, it was the casting method of leaving a rough surface, which makes food stick. Maybe now I can chuck my teflon pans I keep buying over and over.

Stopping at 180 grit, what kind of crazy talk is that?  Time to up your game, at least take it up to 8000 grit.

https://taytools.com/collections/suppl​ies-abrasives-3m-lapping-microfinishin​g-film-polishing-paper/products/3m-281​q-wetordry-6-piece-set

This guy uses 30,000.

[YouTube video: ゼリーは包丁になりますか?]

TIL that 3M makes a 500,000 grit "lapping" paper.  I guess that must be to get rid of the scratches left from the 100,000 grit.


Pretty much

How to make mirror iPhone
Youtube 4k7hWv1lW6A


I mean, it's just lazy, stopping at 100,000 like this guy

/s
 
2021-01-24 4:55:57 PM  
2 votes:

Squid_for_Brains: Don't buy Lodge cast iron. It's crap.

Browse some antique stores or go to EBay/Etsy and find some pre-1940s cast iron. Griswold and Wagner are both great; older pans have a ring and number. They are lighter weight for everyday use (go figure), and the surfaces are so smooth that bad seasoning can be gently scrubbed off with steel wool and re-done. I've rehabbed three now, and I don't use anything else.

Even if the surfaces are pitted and imperfect, they hold seasoning beautifully. You can see your reflection.


I have two Lodge pans from the before times, when they still, correctly, machined the inside surface smooth.  Now they've just cheapened out and dispense with the machining and feed you some "pre-seasoned" line of BS.

I also once had an even older Griswold in my youth.  It was thin and awesome and I made the stupid mistake of putting it under running water when it was still screaming hot.
 
2021-01-24 4:21:13 PM  
2 votes:
It's all pertinent to me right now since I'm busy seasoning a 12 inch 1960 era lodge skillet I picked up at our local thrift store last week.  Bit of scrubbing with the chain mail scrubbie to get the gunk off, and cycling it on the camp stove a few times this afternoon with a bit of oil to 400f to let it get a good coating in there.  It's not my grandma's stovetop monster (I have no idea who got that thing) but it's gonna be a decent camp cooker when I'm done with it.
 
2021-01-24 4:13:39 PM  
2 votes:

Mister Peejay: Gough: gopher321: UPDATE: holy crow, that was easy...10 min with the sander, brought the pebbly surface down to smooth as silk. 5 min with the 80 grit, 5 min with the 180. Time to reseason!

Clarification - it wasn't the Lodge preseasoning I was objecting to, it was the casting method of leaving a rough surface, which makes food stick. Maybe now I can chuck my teflon pans I keep buying over and over.

Stopping at 180 grit, what kind of crazy talk is that?  Time to up your game, at least take it up to 8000 grit.

https://taytools.com/collections/suppl​ies-abrasives-3m-lapping-microfinishin​g-film-polishing-paper/products/3m-281​q-wetordry-6-piece-set

This guy uses 30,000.

[YouTube video: ゼリーは包丁になりますか?]


TIL that 3M makes a 500,000 grit "lapping" paper.  I guess that must be to get rid of the scratches left from the 100,000 grit.
 
2021-01-24 4:04:38 PM  
2 votes:

tintar: Psychopompous: No, I'm sorry, but I tried a brass brush on cast iron and it leaves a brassy film on the metal. Brass cookware has to be sealed in tin before cooking in it, so it follows that smearing brass on a cooking surface is bad. Just clean thoroughly before seasoning. The steel wire is softer than cast iron, so you really can't screw up the surface of the cast iron. It leaves a lovely burnished finish, while preserving the texture from the sand casting.  Definitely follow shop safety protocols. Goggles, dust mask, gloves, and a shirt you don't mind getting filthy with rust dust. I buy cast iron pans and decorative cast iron at flea markets and estate sales and fix them up on a regular basis.

ah, tyty.
my apologies for misinformation, then!

I both bow and hat-tip to your superior experience! (I know, we're still stuck in a bizarre timeline where #poeslaw is meaningless, but I do actually sincerely mean all of the above.)

also, lol, yes a thousand times yes - "do you have a shirt you hate? good!!! wear that."

here... here is a very, very normal and safe and not at all filthy thing we all do in our kitchens, right? right...?!

[Fark user image 850x1133]


Ms. Gough is a recovering middle-school science teacher; we did a number of experiments in our kitchen.  My favorite one is the exploding jack o' lantern using lycopodium powder.

Like this:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zoUJ​G0​ReJ-c
 
2021-01-24 3:30:40 PM  
2 votes:

ShavedOrangutan: rukie: Well to remove seasoning, just out it in the oven in the self cleaning mode. It'll cook off.

If you want an incredible pan though, sand through the grits to a mirror finish. Then season.

In the old days cast pans didn't come with a very smooth finish, so they'd surface them smooth.

Today, casting a lot better and they don't bother post finishing. So a pan from 1880 might be smoother than a new pan today.

I also like to use beef suet for seasoning.

Agreed with the above.  The sanding isn't to remove the seasoning, it's to do a proper finishing of the cast iron itself.  Get it to a mirror finish with the sander and reseason and it'll be as good or better than a teflon pan.

Think of it like resurfacing a brake disk.  You can scrub it with cleaner all you want, but unless you grind it down to a better finish, it's not going to be where you want it.


...and then you have to bed-in the rotors again by getting the brakes up into the temperature zone where pad material deposition occurs, in a controlled manner.

Kind of like seasoning a pan.

/woah
 
2021-01-24 3:29:02 PM  
2 votes:

darkhorse23: Here's our family's horror story:
My grandmother passed down all her cast iron to my mom, who took great care of it and taught us how to as well. My sister and I were supposed to get it all when she died.

Mom got when she was 85, almost died, was in the hospital for weeks and weeks.

Dad thought she was never coming home, so he gave all 8 cast iron skillets and cornbread pans to somebody. Never found out who, probably took them to Goodwill.

We never forgave him for it. What a dick.


that's... that is... wow. wow. if there were truly-unforgivable sins in this world, that is literally one of them.

I can't remember what mine own grandparents used (which is odd since I was a celebrated and precocious little pretty-principesa of la-cuisine since the ripe old age of 3, I 100% would have noticed!) - the one grandmother subsisted entirely upon cigarettes, so that's no help. t'other grandmother, hmm... I don't recall her doing much cooking other than lime-jello rings packed with shredded carrots. and that grandfather, well, his only cooking-implement was a small brick cottage sealed up so that the entire building was its own smokehouse, lololol.

I've recently started talking to my dad again, so I may need to ask him if there's any pan-legacy happening, though. can't hurt, right?
 
2021-01-24 3:08:39 PM  
2 votes:

Mambo Bananapatch: grokca: I never sand mice, it pisses them off.

Try the oven cleaner. Also pissed off mice are not really a problem.


You sound like someone who's never been bit by a mouse.  They give it their all.
 
2021-01-24 2:25:41 PM  
2 votes:

Threp: optikeye: I think in this subby's case it's to deal with a very rusted pan

Citric acid, one tablespoon per liter. Water as hot as you can stand. Wash the rusty thing with wrm soapy water, scrub off any loose rust, then soak in the rusty thing in the acid solution for a couple hours, swirling a few times. Rust is gone. Doesn't damage the iron or weaken it. It's also completely non-toxic.

Old trick for restoring rusted handplanes and chisels.


I keep a bag of that in the kitchen. I use it to descum the dishwasher, it'll dissolve soap build up so you won't get as much spots on glasses. Run it through empty tho can be hash on some items.
Also, a tsp of Citric acid, 2 tsp of baking soda and a BC powder is Alka Seltzer with Caffeine.
 
2021-01-25 5:20:50 PM  
1 vote:

tintar: EdwardTellerhands: It's not an either/or deal for some people. There's cast-iron collectors who like having multiple sizes, etc., and out of curiosity or boredom don't mind buying a Lodge and going to those pains to prep a new skillet. There's hordes of these folks on YouTube. I'm lazy so I haven't gone to that sorta effort, but I've given away seasoned pans to friends and my kids.

I... kind of really, really want to leave my pans to the niece and nephews. except for the part where they are all dumbasses.


I recently learned one of my nephews loves his cast iron pans and when i finish working on a small one that my folks bought when they lived in Fairbanks (1951), and I shamefully let get all rusty, I will be sending it to him.

9 nieces and nephews, and only two of them know a damned thing about cooking, both nephews.  To be fair, one of the nieces is called a basket case even by her own father (and she is), the other 3 were raised in a truly entitled environment.

/But I do love them all
 
2021-01-25 2:41:20 AM  
1 vote:
I am very confused. Why are people using metal things, "skillets", for cooking?
They do not go into the nukawaver.
 
2021-01-25 1:13:57 AM  
1 vote:

EdwardTellerhands: zeroflight222: pheelix: Please explain. I've never had a problem with a Lodge pan that simply cooking with it didn't solve.

Their seasoning only protects the metal & doesn't do the other aspects of a good seasoning, like being non-stick (or close to).  For many, that's goo enough, and many even swear by it.  But for many others it's a quick & dirty layer that's not done properly.   Those generally either strip it off or at least down a few levels and redo.  You can get past it after a lot of cooking, but if people are willing to put in the effort they can get a much better layer themselves.

Some folks simply prefer a smoother surface than what you get on newish Lodge stuff, thus the Metal Shop antics. I've never detected a diff, but this is normally  the kinda thing I get OCD about, so I won't throw stones.


At that point it's easier (and better) to head out to an antique mall or flea market and pick up a mid-20th century cast iron pan. I often see unmarked ones for less than $20.
 
2021-01-24 11:42:36 PM  
1 vote:

EdwardTellerhands: Some folks simply prefer a smoother surface than what you get on newish Lodge stuff, thus the Metal Shop antics. I've never detected a diff, but this is normally  the kinda thing I get OCD about, so I won't throw stones.


agreed, the new-ish Lodge pieces... you are not wrong. they are not bad, exactly, but the way they just put like 1000 pans in a ginormous furnace, it just comes out... kind of unpleasantly rough.

the heck was their earlier trade-name for it, "lodge logic"? yeah, I've had some of those for 15+ years, and it took quite literally that long to get them into actual factual decent shape.

but before This Our Plague-Era, I was farking obsessed with scoring cast-iron, and, even better, Creuset flame-orange-enamelled stuff from our local upscale thrift. this is where the good stuff lives.
 
2021-01-24 11:06:41 PM  
1 vote:

Xcott: Marcus Aurelius: 1. Turn gas grill onto HIGH.
2. Throw in the cast iron.
3. Drink 2 beers.
2.  JUST COOK YOUR GODDAMN FOOD ON THE GODDAMN GRILL
4. Turn off gas grill.

My method is clearly superior.

FTFY.  How do you get a great crust on a steak?  Option 1:  get a really hot fire going and put a crust on the steak.  Option 2:  "Oh you need cast iron from the 40s you need to go to swap meets like this amazing one I found by the river and oh it has to be mirror smooth here's how I prepare it and then continually maintain it I do what this guy does in the YouTube video but his temperatures are all wrong and my method only takes three days...."


No, you sous vide your steak and use a torch to get a crust, fast easy , and you can control how much crust you get.
 
2021-01-24 10:10:56 PM  
1 vote:

pheelix: zeroflight222: Peter von Nostrand: Why are you removing the f'n seasoning only to re-season it? Are you f'n people that dumb?

Have you never come across cast iron that was so farked up it had to be redone from scratch, whether from misuse/neglect or from a crappy factory?  Also, the out-of-the-factory lodge "seasoning" sucks donkey nuts.

Please explain. I've never had a problem with a Lodge pan that simply cooking with it didn't solve.


Don't get me wrong, I have a small lodge camp oven I use when campng and didn't bother to redo it, so it's not THAT bad.  I also have a couple of skillets I stripped & redid and they're much better since then.  The difference between them is pretty big and why I consider the factory layer generally crap.  It falls under "good 'nuff".
 
2021-01-24 9:01:24 PM  
1 vote:

Threp: millia: The next pan I want to do I want to do with the electrolysis stripping, because a) chemistry is fun and b) REALLY clean pans.

Don't. Just don't. Not unless you want incredibly brittle pans that'll crack on you.

Electrolysis, unless you know exactly what you're doing and have a setup that has fine control will introduce a shiatload of hydrogen into the metal and fark up the crystalline structure. It's not terribly important in stuff that isn't going to be temperature stressed, but for something that is, like pans or blades that need re-tempering, it is a very, very bad thing.


Well, dang. It looked like fun. Thanks for replying!
 
2021-01-24 7:48:01 PM  
1 vote:
I've used Easy Off to strip several pans for wedding presents. It works great, but I usually only let it sit for 2 hrs vs the 8 the video suggests and it takes 2 applications to get the really old stuff off.
 
2021-01-24 7:01:40 PM  
1 vote:

tintar: Porous Horace: For regular cleaning, instead of scrubbing with a cleanser & sponge. Something like a Scotchbrite pad.

yeah I keep some of those dark-green thin non-sponge ones around for this exact purpose.
(the $waifu still keeps buying brillos, and gets mortally-offended when I simply ask, "why?" - well, no, that's not quite true, I have "a certain look" when I do that, so... that's really on-me, lol. the hell do I ever use brillo-pads on in the house/yard/car/any-of-the-wheres? never, niente nichevo, nothing. why are we amassing brillos, I really need to know!!!)

EdwardTellerhands: They're excellent for grout and cutting wood or metal flush with adjoining pieces, but meh for sanding. One of two things (or both) happens: The sandpaper creeps back from the tip and shreds or you put too much pressure on the front and create the aforesaid depressions. The weight and shape of the thing just makes precision and evenness impossible for areas larger than an inch or two.

this is kinda-sorta exactly what I always ass-umed, and why I've still yet to try the pointy-sander-part. doesn't hurt that it's there/possible, but, yeah, my go-to remains those dollar tree sanding-sponges or sometimes the teeny drums on my RTX-B (or also the even-cheaper ...*tapatap*... Neiko-branded rotary tool) - man, you get an official 4486 keyless-chuck, and those cheap knockoffs can do just about any of the things. (well, to be fair, the Craftsman one is almost-quality, even tho' still cheap.)

/the neiko is particularly-amusing mainly because even at 22 bucks came with a 42" flex-cable - that... solves SO MANY OF THE PROBLEMS, ha ha ha.
//god, at some point I was lusting after the RTX-6, and $mai_waifu actually bought one for me
///ummm... woman, the rtx-b was already sufficient, but thank you I am not ungrateful?
\\/why do I have 3 freaking non-dremels?
\/oh, right. because the universe knows what I did.


Oh, I've got one of those rotary tools in every damn room! Ten bucks at Harbor Freight, and for my purposes as good as Dremel.
 
2021-01-24 6:52:34 PM  
1 vote:

Porous Horace: For regular cleaning, instead of scrubbing with a cleanser & sponge. Something like a Scotchbrite pad.


yeah I keep some of those dark-green thin non-sponge ones around for this exact purpose.
(the $waifu still keeps buying brillos, and gets mortally-offended when I simply ask, "why?" - well, no, that's not quite true, I have "a certain look" when I do that, so... that's really on-me, lol. the hell do I ever use brillo-pads on in the house/yard/car/any-of-the-wheres? never, niente nichevo, nothing. why are we amassing brillos, I really need to know!!!)

EdwardTellerhands: They're excellent for grout and cutting wood or metal flush with adjoining pieces, but meh for sanding. One of two things (or both) happens: The sandpaper creeps back from the tip and shreds or you put too much pressure on the front and create the aforesaid depressions. The weight and shape of the thing just makes precision and evenness impossible for areas larger than an inch or two.


this is kinda-sorta exactly what I always ass-umed, and why I've still yet to try the pointy-sander-part. doesn't hurt that it's there/possible, but, yeah, my go-to remains those dollar tree sanding-sponges or sometimes the teeny drums on my RTX-B (or also the even-cheaper ...*tapatap*... Neiko-branded rotary tool) - man, you get an official 4486 keyless-chuck, and those cheap knockoffs can do just about any of the things. (well, to be fair, the Craftsman one is almost-quality, even tho' still cheap.)

/the neiko is particularly-amusing mainly because even at 22 bucks came with a 42" flex-cable - that... solves SO MANY OF THE PROBLEMS, ha ha ha.
//god, at some point I was lusting after the RTX-6, and $mai_waifu actually bought one for me
///ummm... woman, the rtx-b was already sufficient, but thank you I am not ungrateful?
\\/why do I have 3 freaking non-dremels?
\/oh, right. because the universe knows what I did.
 
2021-01-24 6:31:45 PM  
1 vote:

tintar: Porous Horace: Possible to use a sander like that to scrub bathroom tile?

the sonic-screwdriver I linked upthread has a grout-removal blade, but is not included - costs extra.

or if you simply meant cleaning/polishing... the sandpapers that came with mine are pretty coarse. and from the looks of it, the mouse sander people have mentioned ent exactly look like it comes with delicate ones neither. but you could always buy finer papers. (honestly the cheapskate in me sez, get the exact sandpaper of your choice, cut out appropriate shapes by hand, then double-sided tape it to your mouse or oscillating-tool or orbital or whatever?)


For regular cleaning, instead of scrubbing with a cleanser & sponge. Something like a Scotchbrite pad.
 
2021-01-24 6:28:50 PM  
1 vote:

tintar: oh wow, a fellow-soul!!! you are now in green-3 as, "much crispy Stellas" - much respect!



Livin' At the Corner of Dude & Catastrophe
Youtube CEzv_QHVPq4
 
2021-01-24 5:52:08 PM  
1 vote:
Possible to use a sander like that to scrub bathroom tile?
 
2021-01-24 5:30:06 PM  
1 vote:

Percise1: Gough: Mister Peejay: Gough: gopher321: UPDATE: holy crow, that was easy...10 min with the sander, brought the pebbly surface down to smooth as silk. 5 min with the 80 grit, 5 min with the 180. Time to reseason!

Clarification - it wasn't the Lodge preseasoning I was objecting to, it was the casting method of leaving a rough surface, which makes food stick. Maybe now I can chuck my teflon pans I keep buying over and over.

Stopping at 180 grit, what kind of crazy talk is that?  Time to up your game, at least take it up to 8000 grit.

https://taytools.com/collections/suppl​ies-abrasives-3m-lapping-microfinishin​g-film-polishing-paper/products/3m-281​q-wetordry-6-piece-set

This guy uses 30,000.

[YouTube video: ゼリーは包丁になりますか?]

TIL that 3M makes a 500,000 grit "lapping" paper.  I guess that must be to get rid of the scratches left from the 100,000 grit.

My finishing stones are 8,000 and 10,000 and I consider that overdone. *shrug*
(have machined optics)


Agreed.  On top of those two, I also have a 14,000 for the final step of resharpening a straight razor that needs more than just a good stropping.  That level is way beyond what you need for anything less than actual shaving.
 
2021-01-24 4:49:32 PM  
1 vote:

tintar: Xcott: Marcus Aurelius: 1. Turn gas grill onto HIGH.
2. Throw in the cast iron.
3. Drink 2 beers.
2.  JUST COOK YOUR GODDAMN FOOD ON THE GODDAMN GRILL
4. Turn off gas grill.

My method is clearly superior.

FTFY.  How do you get a great crust on a steak?  Option 1:  get a really hot fire going and put a crust on the steak.  Option 2:  "Oh you need cast iron from the 40s you need to go to swap meets like this amazing one I found by the river and oh it has to be mirror smooth here's how I prepare it and then continually maintain it I do what this guy does in the YouTube video but his temperatures are all wrong and my method only takes three days...."

although... I am very curious to know your secret step 3!

does it involve profit? or extra-sooper-sekrit garage-beers? or owls? please say it involves owls!!! and why do you hate charcoal so very, very much?

I do also admit to curiosity about people who sous-vide their ribeye/whatever and only then sear it afterward. never had that method.

or I guess you can just leave the sear off, so that it goes... *PLORP*
(Narrator: don't forget *GLIGGLE* too!)

[Fark user image 700x715]

/ha ha ha, creation-myth


I have to admit, I was going to correct the "gas grill" bit too.  I'm such a charcoal fiend that I can pick out the brand by smell---and it's not just me, my kid can tell from his steak if I didn't use the lump charcoal from Wegman's.

I used to sous-vide steak, and it's still convenient when you're grilling for 20-40 people, but when grilling over charcoal I'd rather have the steak over the coals for as long as possible rather than sitting in a bag.

But yes, it all involves extra garage beers.  Or as Roast Beef would say, much crispy Stellas.  That golden action is so crunchy.  One more reason to use actual fire rather than simulating it with a pan that must then be carefully groomed.
 
2021-01-24 4:13:33 PM  
1 vote:

tintar: Xcott: Marcus Aurelius: 1. Turn gas grill onto HIGH.
2. Throw in the cast iron.
3. Drink 2 beers.
2.  JUST COOK YOUR GODDAMN FOOD ON THE GODDAMN GRILL
4. Turn off gas grill.

My method is clearly superior.

FTFY.  How do you get a great crust on a steak?  Option 1:  get a really hot fire going and put a crust on the steak.  Option 2:  "Oh you need cast iron from the 40s you need to go to swap meets like this amazing one I found by the river and oh it has to be mirror smooth here's how I prepare it and then continually maintain it I do what this guy does in the YouTube video but his temperatures are all wrong and my method only takes three days...."

although... I am very curious to know your secret step 3!

does it involve profit? or extra-sooper-sekrit garage-beers? or owls? please say it involves owls!!! and why do you hate charcoal so very, very much?

I do also admit to curiosity about people who sous-vide their ribeye/whatever and only then sear it afterward. never had that method.

or I guess you can just leave the sear off, so that it goes... *PLORP*
(Narrator: don't forget *GLIGGLE* too!)

[Fark user image 700x715]

/ha ha ha, creation-myth


....and I apparently get to be one of the 10,000 today, as I didn't realize I was an Achewood fan. Thanks! Gotta go read a ton of Achewood now.
 
2021-01-24 3:19:56 PM  
1 vote:

millia: revrendjim: The real enemy is mechanical abrasion. Soap or no soap, scrubbing too hard will wear through the polymer.

Also, this. I can't understand why people say that using course salt to scrub a pan is fine, but mild soap isn't.


I think several people in this thread were talkin' 'bout seriously wanting to get back to bare metal?

but aside from that, I mean, it took me decades to get over the anti-soap thing. and yet I still only use kosher salt. used to totally freak me out if I even suspected soap on the kitchen sink brushes/sponges/scrubbies. these days? barely makes one eye even half-twitch, lol.

and part of that salt-thing is still... I can leave the jorb half-assed-unfinished, bung the thing into the oven, set the dial to "STUPID" and then when it comes out, the salt will still be there for moar scrubbing.
 
2021-01-24 3:10:26 PM  
1 vote:

revrendjim: arrogantbastich: The only cleaning mine get is the occasional boiling water to get some persistent bits off with just lightly scraping it with a fork. The only time we actually reseasoned a pan was when we had some idiot (FIL!) wash it with dishsoap. We didn't want to refinish it because it was super smooth. Just a mild abrasive sponge and lots of steam.

Dish soap can't hurt the seasoning. People think this because the seasoning is made from oil or fat, which can be dissolved in detergent, but the high heat has broken down the fat and reformed it into a polymer that is essentially a kind of plastic that can't be dissolved in soapy water. The real enemy is mechanical abrasion. Soap or no soap, scrubbing too hard will wear through the polymer.


Yes. Dish soap is fine. The soap that causes the problem is lye soap. THAT will eat through it.

Conveniently, that either the same stuff as easy-off or very close to it. And it DOES work great to clean off pans you get that are thoroughly wrecked. I will use the easy-off - I'd prefer straight lye, but it's hard to find - to get it mostly clean, then scrub and sand. A mild bath in peroxide and acid, and it's ready to go. The flax oil works fine, and since I have some I use it. I suspect any oil of high enough heat would work as well, as long as you do it in small layers. The next pan I want to do I want to do with the electrolysis stripping, because a) chemistry is fun and b) REALLY clean pans.

What I would like to find is any research and papers on the subject. I couldn't find any. I would like to know more about the metal states under a well seasoned pan to know if it's worth trying to blue. I know it works well on guns, but the methods I have seen for guns are not something I'd feel comfortable doing with a pan. I'm not worried about easy-off on a pan to start off with, but I sure am with some of the bluing chemicals.
 
2021-01-24 2:54:22 PM  
1 vote:

Marcus Aurelius: 1. Turn gas grill onto HIGH.
2. Throw in the cast iron.
3. Drink 2 beers.

2.  JUST COOK YOUR GODDAMN FOOD ON THE GODDAMN GRILL
4. Turn off gas grill.

My method is clearly superior.


FTFY.  How do you get a great crust on a steak?  Option 1:  get a really hot fire going and put a crust on the steak.  Option 2:  "Oh you need cast iron from the 40s you need to go to swap meets like this amazing one I found by the river and oh it has to be mirror smooth here's how I prepare it and then continually maintain it I do what this guy does in the YouTube video but his temperatures are all wrong and my method only takes three days...."
 
2021-01-24 2:39:37 PM  
1 vote:
Enameled cast iron ftw

/anosmia
 
2021-01-24 1:35:46 PM  
1 vote:

darkhorse23: As an old southern woman, I'm shocked, shocked I tell you that anyone would even consider doing this to a seasoned pan. It's heresy, pure and simple.


I think in this subby's case it's to deal with a very rusted pan. I've had some barn 'rescue' pans that needed big help....fortunately at the time I had access to a sandblaster.
 
2021-01-24 11:24:49 AM  
1 vote:
Save the easy off for your steel sheet pans.
 
2021-01-24 11:06:43 AM  
1 vote:
The only cleaning mine get is the occasional boiling water to get some persistent bits off with just lightly scraping it with a fork. The only time we actually reseasoned a pan was when we had some idiot (FIL!) wash it with dishsoap. We didn't want to refinish it because it was super smooth. Just a mild abrasive sponge and lots of steam.
 
2021-01-24 10:26:56 AM  
1 vote:
Also, my oven is a dinosaur, it has no self-cleaning option
 
2021-01-24 10:18:28 AM  
1 vote:
wire wheel on your angle grinder works just as well.
 
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