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(YouTube)   So, subby bought a mouse sander as seen on YouTube videos to strip the seasoning off his Lodge cast iron pan - after further searching, I found a video showing someone doing the same thing with Easy Off oven cleaner. Anyone tried this?   (youtube.com) divider line
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535 clicks; posted to Food » on 24 Jan 2021 at 2:14 PM (14 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-01-24 9:01:24 PM  

Threp: millia: The next pan I want to do I want to do with the electrolysis stripping, because a) chemistry is fun and b) REALLY clean pans.

Don't. Just don't. Not unless you want incredibly brittle pans that'll crack on you.

Electrolysis, unless you know exactly what you're doing and have a setup that has fine control will introduce a shiatload of hydrogen into the metal and fark up the crystalline structure. It's not terribly important in stuff that isn't going to be temperature stressed, but for something that is, like pans or blades that need re-tempering, it is a very, very bad thing.


Well, dang. It looked like fun. Thanks for replying!
 
2021-01-24 9:02:29 PM  

SoupGuru: People over think cast iron plans.


Good Lord, this.
 
2021-01-24 9:04:47 PM  
Just reverse seared a ribeye for the first time and wiped the pan clean with a paper towel, so I'm getting a kick out of the replies.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-01-24 9:13:53 PM  
You'll beat the shiat out of your oven running it as hot as you have to in order to strip the pan. Then there's the smoke detectors going off from all the smoke, and since you're incinerating polymerized oil the smoke it's producing is chock full of carcinogens.

For a modern Lodge pan, a gas grill set to high gets the job done. Once up to temperature, my Weber Genesis takes about 35 minutes. That's in the summer though so YMMV. Let the pan cool off thoroughly before trying to move it afterward. It'll be well above whatever your oven mitts can handle. I wouldn't recommend either of those methods for a vintage Wagner or Griswold pan because they're thinner and more susceptible to warping. For less destructive methods, there's tons and tons of good advice on how to properly strip a pan here.

Your other alternative is to snoop around the website I linked above to learn what to look for and try to find an unmarked vintage Wagner, Lodge, or Birmingham Stove & Range pan at an antique mall. Since they don't have any fancy trademarks or logos on them, they're often found for less than 20 bucks and cook like a dream. The Lodge and BS&R pans are heavier than the more expensive Wagners and Griswolds but the extra weight also tyically means they're less likely to be warped.

Now that all that's been said, 95% of the time a modern Lodge doesn't need to be stripped. It just needs use. Seasoning builds on itself. Pancakes are a great one to soften up the bumps on a new Lodge. Make a large batch but cook them one at a time, in a different spot each time. Give the pan a short blast of cooking spray between each pancake. Regulate the temp so it stays only just barely below the smoke point. Pro tip: When you put oil in the pan, give the pan time to heat up first, then add the oil and give IT a little time to heat up. Cold oil in a hot pan will stick almost as bad as cooking with cold oil in a cold pan.

/Have well over 100 pieces of cast iron cookware in my basement
 
2021-01-24 9:38:14 PM  
Why are you removing the f'n seasoning only to re-season it? Are you f'n people that dumb?
 
2021-01-24 9:45:44 PM  

Peter von Nostrand: Why are you removing the f'n seasoning only to re-season it? Are you f'n people that dumb?


Have you never come across cast iron that was so farked up it had to be redone from scratch, whether from misuse/neglect or from a crappy factory?  Also, the out-of-the-factory lodge "seasoning" sucks donkey nuts.
 
2021-01-24 9:52:41 PM  

zeroflight222: Peter von Nostrand: Why are you removing the f'n seasoning only to re-season it? Are you f'n people that dumb?

Have you never come across cast iron that was so farked up it had to be redone from scratch, whether from misuse/neglect or from a crappy factory?  Also, the out-of-the-factory lodge "seasoning" sucks donkey nuts.


Please explain. I've never had a problem with a Lodge pan that simply cooking with it didn't solve.
 
2021-01-24 10:04:19 PM  

pheelix: zeroflight222: Peter von Nostrand: Why are you removing the f'n seasoning only to re-season it? Are you f'n people that dumb?

Have you never come across cast iron that was so farked up it had to be redone from scratch, whether from misuse/neglect or from a crappy factory?  Also, the out-of-the-factory lodge "seasoning" sucks donkey nuts.

Please explain. I've never had a problem with a Lodge pan that simply cooking with it didn't solve.


Their seasoning only protects the metal & doesn't do the other aspects of a good seasoning, like being non-stick (or close to).  For many, that's goo enough, and many even swear by it.  But for many others it's a quick & dirty layer that's not done properly.   Those generally either strip it off or at least down a few levels and redo.  You can get past it after a lot of cooking, but if people are willing to put in the effort they can get a much better layer themselves.
 
2021-01-24 10:10:56 PM  

pheelix: zeroflight222: Peter von Nostrand: Why are you removing the f'n seasoning only to re-season it? Are you f'n people that dumb?

Have you never come across cast iron that was so farked up it had to be redone from scratch, whether from misuse/neglect or from a crappy factory?  Also, the out-of-the-factory lodge "seasoning" sucks donkey nuts.

Please explain. I've never had a problem with a Lodge pan that simply cooking with it didn't solve.


Don't get me wrong, I have a small lodge camp oven I use when campng and didn't bother to redo it, so it's not THAT bad.  I also have a couple of skillets I stripped & redid and they're much better since then.  The difference between them is pretty big and why I consider the factory layer generally crap.  It falls under "good 'nuff".
 
2021-01-24 10:13:14 PM  

zeroflight222: pheelix: Please explain. I've never had a problem with a Lodge pan that simply cooking with it didn't solve.

Their seasoning only protects the metal & doesn't do the other aspects of a good seasoning, like being non-stick (or close to).  For many, that's goo enough, and many even swear by it.  But for many others it's a quick & dirty layer that's not done properly.   Those generally either strip it off or at least down a few levels and redo.  You can get past it after a lot of cooking, but if people are willing to put in the effort they can get a much better layer themselves.


Some folks simply prefer a smoother surface than what you get on newish Lodge stuff, thus the Metal Shop antics. I've never detected a diff, but this is normally  the kinda thing I get OCD about, so I won't throw stones.
 
2021-01-24 10:20:02 PM  
I've read that you can destroy the seasoning on a cast iron pan by leaving it out for shiatty roommates to use. They'll simmer an acidic tomato sauce to partially dissolve the seasoning, then soak it overnight to coat it with rust.
 
2021-01-24 10:32:15 PM  
The 2nd time you use a cast iron skillet, you know all there is to know about how to use it. From the anxiety here you'd imagine it was like handling a time machine or a slot car.
 
2021-01-24 11:06:41 PM  

Xcott: Marcus Aurelius: 1. Turn gas grill onto HIGH.
2. Throw in the cast iron.
3. Drink 2 beers.
2.  JUST COOK YOUR GODDAMN FOOD ON THE GODDAMN GRILL
4. Turn off gas grill.

My method is clearly superior.

FTFY.  How do you get a great crust on a steak?  Option 1:  get a really hot fire going and put a crust on the steak.  Option 2:  "Oh you need cast iron from the 40s you need to go to swap meets like this amazing one I found by the river and oh it has to be mirror smooth here's how I prepare it and then continually maintain it I do what this guy does in the YouTube video but his temperatures are all wrong and my method only takes three days...."


No, you sous vide your steak and use a torch to get a crust, fast easy , and you can control how much crust you get.
 
2021-01-24 11:07:20 PM  

Percise1: Gough: Mister Peejay: Gough: gopher321: UPDATE: holy crow, that was easy...10 min with the sander, brought the pebbly surface down to smooth as silk. 5 min with the 80 grit, 5 min with the 180. Time to reseason!

Clarification - it wasn't the Lodge preseasoning I was objecting to, it was the casting method of leaving a rough surface, which makes food stick. Maybe now I can chuck my teflon pans I keep buying over and over.

Stopping at 180 grit, what kind of crazy talk is that?  Time to up your game, at least take it up to 8000 grit.

https://taytools.com/collections/suppl​ies-abrasives-3m-lapping-microfinishin​g-film-polishing-paper/products/3m-281​q-wetordry-6-piece-set

This guy uses 30,000.

[YouTube video: ゼリーは包丁になりますか?]

TIL that 3M makes a 500,000 grit "lapping" paper.  I guess that must be to get rid of the scratches left from the 100,000 grit.

My finishing stones are 8,000 and 10,000 and I consider that overdone. *shrug*
(have machined optics)


When I'm polishing my cajons, I stop using paper/film abrasives after 8000 grit.  After that I switch to liquid polishes developed  for automotive finishes and an orbital buffer.
 
2021-01-24 11:42:36 PM  

EdwardTellerhands: Some folks simply prefer a smoother surface than what you get on newish Lodge stuff, thus the Metal Shop antics. I've never detected a diff, but this is normally  the kinda thing I get OCD about, so I won't throw stones.


agreed, the new-ish Lodge pieces... you are not wrong. they are not bad, exactly, but the way they just put like 1000 pans in a ginormous furnace, it just comes out... kind of unpleasantly rough.

the heck was their earlier trade-name for it, "lodge logic"? yeah, I've had some of those for 15+ years, and it took quite literally that long to get them into actual factual decent shape.

but before This Our Plague-Era, I was farking obsessed with scoring cast-iron, and, even better, Creuset flame-orange-enamelled stuff from our local upscale thrift. this is where the good stuff lives.
 
2021-01-25 1:05:08 AM  

zeroflight222: pheelix: zeroflight222: Peter von Nostrand: Why are you removing the f'n seasoning only to re-season it? Are you f'n people that dumb?

Have you never come across cast iron that was so farked up it had to be redone from scratch, whether from misuse/neglect or from a crappy factory?  Also, the out-of-the-factory lodge "seasoning" sucks donkey nuts.

Please explain. I've never had a problem with a Lodge pan that simply cooking with it didn't solve.

Their seasoning only protects the metal & doesn't do the other aspects of a good seasoning, like being non-stick (or close to).  For many, that's goo enough, and many even swear by it.  But for many others it's a quick & dirty layer that's not done properly.   Those generally either strip it off or at least down a few levels and redo.  You can get past it after a lot of cooking, but if people are willing to put in the effort they can get a much better layer themselves.


That's the thing. The quick & dirty layer is just a base coat of soy based vegetable oil. It'll hold whatever oil you prefer just fine, so what's the point in stripping it?
 
2021-01-25 1:13:57 AM  

EdwardTellerhands: zeroflight222: pheelix: Please explain. I've never had a problem with a Lodge pan that simply cooking with it didn't solve.

Their seasoning only protects the metal & doesn't do the other aspects of a good seasoning, like being non-stick (or close to).  For many, that's goo enough, and many even swear by it.  But for many others it's a quick & dirty layer that's not done properly.   Those generally either strip it off or at least down a few levels and redo.  You can get past it after a lot of cooking, but if people are willing to put in the effort they can get a much better layer themselves.

Some folks simply prefer a smoother surface than what you get on newish Lodge stuff, thus the Metal Shop antics. I've never detected a diff, but this is normally  the kinda thing I get OCD about, so I won't throw stones.


At that point it's easier (and better) to head out to an antique mall or flea market and pick up a mid-20th century cast iron pan. I often see unmarked ones for less than $20.
 
2021-01-25 1:28:56 AM  

pheelix: EdwardTellerhands: zeroflight222: pheelix: Please explain. I've never had a problem with a Lodge pan that simply cooking with it didn't solve.

Their seasoning only protects the metal & doesn't do the other aspects of a good seasoning, like being non-stick (or close to).  For many, that's goo enough, and many even swear by it.  But for many others it's a quick & dirty layer that's not done properly.   Those generally either strip it off or at least down a few levels and redo.  You can get past it after a lot of cooking, but if people are willing to put in the effort they can get a much better layer themselves.

Some folks simply prefer a smoother surface than what you get on newish Lodge stuff, thus the Metal Shop antics. I've never detected a diff, but this is normally  the kinda thing I get OCD about, so I won't throw stones.

At that point it's easier (and better) to head out to an antique mall or flea market and pick up a mid-20th century cast iron pan. I often see unmarked ones for less than $20.


It's not an either/or deal for some people. There's cast-iron collectors who like having multiple sizes, etc., and out of curiosity or boredom don't mind buying a Lodge and going to those pains to prep a new skillet. There's hordes of these folks on YouTube. I'm lazy so I haven't gone to that sorta effort, but I've given away seasoned pans to friends and my kids.
 
2021-01-25 1:38:57 AM  

EdwardTellerhands: It's not an either/or deal for some people. There's cast-iron collectors who like having multiple sizes, etc., and out of curiosity or boredom don't mind buying a Lodge and going to those pains to prep a new skillet. There's hordes of these folks on YouTube. I'm lazy so I haven't gone to that sorta effort, but I've given away seasoned pans to friends and my kids.


I... kind of really, really want to leave my pans to the niece and nephews. except for the part where they are all dumbasses.
 
2021-01-25 2:41:20 AM  
I am very confused. Why are people using metal things, "skillets", for cooking?
They do not go into the nukawaver.
 
2021-01-25 3:41:34 AM  
Ok, so no one uses some sort of power tool to clean bathroom tiles?
Everyone scrubs by hand like peasants?
It's 2015, fcol!
 
2021-01-25 6:06:26 AM  

Porous Horace: Ok, so no one uses some sort of power tool to clean bathroom tiles?
Everyone scrubs by hand like peasants?
It's 2015, fcol!


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we... normally use a swiffer 'wetjet' what has been illegally-refilled with parple Fabuloso?

it... it takes batteries? although I wouldn't exactly classify it as a power-tool, lol...

/mebbe I should be using the sonic screwdriver to clean the bathrooms here t'home...
 
2021-01-25 6:17:17 AM  
My Teflon coated pans cook just fine except for the twenty year old ones. My recent-vintage Lodge and the All Clads I inherited from my parents do too. Yes, even when I cook Big Manly Slabs of Real Meat. There comes a point where it stops being about cooking and turns into performative consumption.
 
2021-01-25 8:25:44 AM  
Throw it in the fire pit for a few hours the coals will strip it. Sand it to fine then use a high temp oil to reseason.
 
2021-01-25 10:11:51 AM  

EdwardTellerhands: pheelix: EdwardTellerhands: zeroflight222: pheelix: Please explain. I've never had a problem with a Lodge pan that simply cooking with it didn't solve.

Their seasoning only protects the metal & doesn't do the other aspects of a good seasoning, like being non-stick (or close to).  For many, that's goo enough, and many even swear by it.  But for many others it's a quick & dirty layer that's not done properly.   Those generally either strip it off or at least down a few levels and redo.  You can get past it after a lot of cooking, but if people are willing to put in the effort they can get a much better layer themselves.

Some folks simply prefer a smoother surface than what you get on newish Lodge stuff, thus the Metal Shop antics. I've never detected a diff, but this is normally  the kinda thing I get OCD about, so I won't throw stones.

At that point it's easier (and better) to head out to an antique mall or flea market and pick up a mid-20th century cast iron pan. I often see unmarked ones for less than $20.

It's not an either/or deal for some people. There's cast-iron collectors who like having multiple sizes, etc., and out of curiosity or boredom don't mind buying a Lodge and going to those pains to prep a new skillet. There's hordes of these folks on YouTube. I'm lazy so I haven't gone to that sorta effort, but I've given away seasoned pans to friends and my kids.


About 5 years ago cast iron  collecting turned into a hobby for me. I come across a lot of high quality mid-20th Century unmarked American made cast iron when I'm hunting for the rarer stuff. If it's under $10 and isn't warped, pitted, or cracked I buy it no matter what. They're the ones I'll clean, season, and give to a relative or friend who says "I've always wanted to try cooking on cast iron".
 
2021-01-25 10:26:47 AM  

pheelix: EdwardTellerhands: ...About 5 years ago cast iron  collecting turned into a hobby for me. I come across a lot of high quality mid-20th Century unmarked American made cast iron when I'm hunting for the rarer stuff. If it's under $10 and isn't warped, pitted, or cracked I buy it no matter what. They're the ones I'll clean, season, and give to a relative or friend who says "I've always wanted to try cooking on cast iron".


Well, that's you, though. There are people who buy new Lodge skillets and resurface them, for whatever reason. Maybe they don't like having "used" stuff; who knows?
 
2021-01-25 12:36:01 PM  

T Baggins: I've read that you can destroy the seasoning on a cast iron pan by leaving it out for shiatty roommates to use. They'll simmer an acidic tomato sauce to partially dissolve the seasoning, then soak it overnight to coat it with rust.


Sure is a lot of nonsense in this thread.

https://www.seriouseats.com/2014/11/t​h​e-truth-about-cast-iron.html

http://sherylcanter.com/wordpress/201​0​/01/a-science-based-technique-for-seas​oning-cast-iron/
 
2021-01-25 12:50:28 PM  

CheekyMonkey: T Baggins: I've read that you can destroy the seasoning on a cast iron pan by leaving it out for shiatty roommates to use. They'll simmer an acidic tomato sauce to partially dissolve the seasoning, then soak it overnight to coat it with rust.

Sure is a lot of nonsense in this thread.

https://www.seriouseats.com/2014/11/th​e-truth-about-cast-iron.html


"No matter how well you season, there's still a good chance that there are spots of bare metal and these can indeed interact with acidic ingredients in your food.
For this reason, it's a good idea to avoid long-simmered acidic things, particularly tomato sauce."

"Don't let it stay wet. Water is the natural enemy of iron and letting even a drop of water sit in your pan when you put it away can lead to a rust spot."

where's the nonsense?
 
2021-01-25 1:03:10 PM  

EdwardTellerhands: pheelix: EdwardTellerhands: ...About 5 years ago cast iron  collecting turned into a hobby for me. I come across a lot of high quality mid-20th Century unmarked American made cast iron when I'm hunting for the rarer stuff. If it's under $10 and isn't warped, pitted, or cracked I buy it no matter what. They're the ones I'll clean, season, and give to a relative or friend who says "I've always wanted to try cooking on cast iron".

Well, that's you, though. There are people who buy new Lodge skillets and resurface them, for whatever reason. Maybe they don't like having "used" stuff; who knows?


I'll gladly admit to buying new iron and resurfacing it.

Turns out I didn't have any iron griddles for my grill.  It's a big surface, so big griddles seemed necessary.  Found a couple of cheap Chinese 17" x 17" griddles online.

Iron's iron, so we're off to a good start.

But the surface was absolute ass.  Neat thing about liking to cook AND building race cars, there's a knee mill in the shop.

20 minutes later, they're perfectly smooth.  Fly cutters and polishing pads for the win.

After seasoning, they're like glass.  Might have overshot the goal.  Now I have to chase eggs around with the spatula 'cause they don't stick at all.
 
2021-01-25 1:16:18 PM  

CheekyMonkey: T Baggins: I've read that you can destroy the seasoning on a cast iron pan by leaving it out for shiatty roommates to use. They'll simmer an acidic tomato sauce to partially dissolve the seasoning, then soak it overnight to coat it with rust.

Sure is a lot of nonsense in this thread.

https://www.seriouseats.com/2014/11/th​e-truth-about-cast-iron.html

http://sherylcanter.com/wordpress/2010​/01/a-science-based-technique-for-seas​oning-cast-iron/


I'd caution people against using flaxseed oil, As Canter recommends. As does your first source, Serious Eats. Many, many people have used flaxseed oil only to have it flake off with repeated use. After reading Canter's article, I seasoned all of my cast iron (about 5 pieces) with flaxseed oil (and yes, I got the good stuff that is super expensive and requires refrigeration). Some of it is still in tact, years later. But other pieces flaked, some just a little bit some a lot. Ultimately, the ones seasoned with flaxseed aren't much or any better than ones I've seasoned with canola oil. So I'd recommend the cheaper oil.
 
2021-01-25 1:27:52 PM  

rohar: Neat thing about liking to cook AND building race cars, there's a knee mill in the shop.

20 minutes later, they're perfectly smooth.  Fly cutters and polishing pads for the win.

After seasoning, they're like glass.  Might have overshot the goal.  Now I have to chase eggs around with the spatula 'cause they don't stick at all.


lucky duck!!!

/funny was for the part about the eggs, ha ha ha! that's awesome!
 
2021-01-25 2:13:03 PM  

phlegmjay: CheekyMonkey: T Baggins: I've read that you can destroy the seasoning on a cast iron pan by leaving it out for shiatty roommates to use. They'll simmer an acidic tomato sauce to partially dissolve the seasoning, then soak it overnight to coat it with rust.

Sure is a lot of nonsense in this thread.

https://www.seriouseats.com/2014/11/th​e-truth-about-cast-iron.html

http://sherylcanter.com/wordpress/2010​/01/a-science-based-technique-for-seas​oning-cast-iron/

I'd caution people against using flaxseed oil, As Canter recommends. As does your first source, Serious Eats. Many, many people have used flaxseed oil only to have it flake off with repeated use. After reading Canter's article, I seasoned all of my cast iron (about 5 pieces) with flaxseed oil (and yes, I got the good stuff that is super expensive and requires refrigeration). Some of it is still in tact, years later. But other pieces flaked, some just a little bit some a lot. Ultimately, the ones seasoned with flaxseed aren't much or any better than ones I've seasoned with canola oil. So I'd recommend the cheaper oil.


Personally, I've never had a problem with flaxseed oil.  I cook every day with cast iron and it's seasoned according to the Canter link.  None has ever flaked off.  I don't "baby" it, either.  It gets cleaned with a Scotchbrite pad and soap, same as all the other dishes.  I cook acidic things it it, including long braises with tomato-based sauces.  *At least* once a week, a dirty cast-iron skillet gets left in the sink, full of water, until the next morning because I'm too lazy to wash it after dinner.

There is never any rust from that last bit of heresy, because the multi-layer polymerized flaxseed coating is rock-solid and all over.

I do have 2 non-enameled cast iron Dutch ovens which are, at this point, unseasoned, because I use them for baking bread in, and cooking in my fireplace, and no matter what oil one uses, it isn't going to survive at 550F oven, or hanging over a wood fire.

The cost of flaxseed oil doesn't really concern me, as seasoning cast iron uses so little.  Plus, I carve wooden spoons and other cooking utensils, and have switched to protecting them with flaxseed oil as well.  Multiple coats, cured in a 170F toaster over for 1 hour per coat, protects wooden utensils far better than anything else I've tried.
 
2021-01-25 2:16:36 PM  

rohar: EdwardTellerhands: pheelix: EdwardTellerhands: ...About 5 years ago cast iron  collecting turned into a hobby for me. I come across a lot of high quality mid-20th Century unmarked American made cast iron when I'm hunting for the rarer stuff. If it's under $10 and isn't warped, pitted, or cracked I buy it no matter what. They're the ones I'll clean, season, and give to a relative or friend who says "I've always wanted to try cooking on cast iron".

Well, that's you, though. There are people who buy new Lodge skillets and resurface them, for whatever reason. Maybe they don't like having "used" stuff; who knows?

I'll gladly admit to buying new iron and resurfacing it.

Turns out I didn't have any iron griddles for my grill.  It's a big surface, so big griddles seemed necessary.  Found a couple of cheap Chinese 17" x 17" griddles online.

Iron's iron, so we're off to a good start.

But the surface was absolute ass.  Neat thing about liking to cook AND building race cars, there's a knee mill in the shop.

20 minutes later, they're perfectly smooth.  Fly cutters and polishing pads for the win.

After seasoning, they're like glass.  Might have overshot the goal.  Now I have to chase eggs around with the spatula 'cause they don't stick at all.


Now THAT I can see doing! It's the same way Wagner and Griswold did theirs back in the first half of the 20th century.
 
2021-01-25 5:20:50 PM  

tintar: EdwardTellerhands: It's not an either/or deal for some people. There's cast-iron collectors who like having multiple sizes, etc., and out of curiosity or boredom don't mind buying a Lodge and going to those pains to prep a new skillet. There's hordes of these folks on YouTube. I'm lazy so I haven't gone to that sorta effort, but I've given away seasoned pans to friends and my kids.

I... kind of really, really want to leave my pans to the niece and nephews. except for the part where they are all dumbasses.


I recently learned one of my nephews loves his cast iron pans and when i finish working on a small one that my folks bought when they lived in Fairbanks (1951), and I shamefully let get all rusty, I will be sending it to him.

9 nieces and nephews, and only two of them know a damned thing about cooking, both nephews.  To be fair, one of the nieces is called a basket case even by her own father (and she is), the other 3 were raised in a truly entitled environment.

/But I do love them all
 
2021-01-25 6:25:57 PM  

NotThatGuyAgain: tintar: EdwardTellerhands: It's not an either/or deal for some people. There's cast-iron collectors who like having multiple sizes, etc., and out of curiosity or boredom don't mind buying a Lodge and going to those pains to prep a new skillet. There's hordes of these folks on YouTube. I'm lazy so I haven't gone to that sorta effort, but I've given away seasoned pans to friends and my kids.

I... kind of really, really want to leave my pans to the niece and nephews. except for the part where they are all dumbasses.

I recently learned one of my nephews loves his cast iron pans and when i finish working on a small one that my folks bought when they lived in Fairbanks (1951), and I shamefully let get all rusty, I will be sending it to him.

9 nieces and nephews, and only two of them know a damned thing about cooking, both nephews.  To be fair, one of the nieces is called a basket case even by her own father (and she is), the other 3 were raised in a truly entitled environment.

/But I do love them all


that's awesome!!! I do have one nephew who sort of feels like spiritual-kin to me - e.g. he loves the whole loose-tea/ritual/apparatus/experience. hims hasn't gotten into cooking just quite yet, but I feel like he might. he's maybe 9 now? (I mean, I was cooking up a storm at 3yo. but that's more of a lol-brag than any sort of expectation, ha ha ha! I was quite the precocious little scamp *rolls eyes at self*)

one of my brothers is a Test Kitchen addict, so maybe that niece+nephew might get eventually be corrupted/roped-into-it (but... yeah, those 2 kids are super-beyond-entitled. "momma/dadda/Unca'? I NEED a glass of water!!!" - ummm... kid, you are 15 years old, that nonsense should have stopped 10 years ago.
 
2021-01-25 8:44:52 PM  

rohar: EdwardTellerhands: pheelix: EdwardTellerhands: ...About 5 years ago cast iron  collecting turned into a hobby for me. I come across a lot of high quality mid-20th Century unmarked American made cast iron when I'm hunting for the rarer stuff. If it's under $10 and isn't warped, pitted, or cracked I buy it no matter what. They're the ones I'll clean, season, and give to a relative or friend who says "I've always wanted to try cooking on cast iron".

Well, that's you, though. There are people who buy new Lodge skillets and resurface them, for whatever reason. Maybe they don't like having "used" stuff; who knows?

I'll gladly admit to buying new iron and resurfacing it.

Turns out I didn't have any iron griddles for my grill.  It's a big surface, so big griddles seemed necessary.  Found a couple of cheap Chinese 17" x 17" griddles online.

Iron's iron, so we're off to a good start.

But the surface was absolute ass.  Neat thing about liking to cook AND building race cars, there's a knee mill in the shop.

20 minutes later, they're perfectly smooth.  Fly cutters and polishing pads for the win.

After seasoning, they're like glass.  Might have overshot the goal.  Now I have to chase eggs around with the spatula 'cause they don't stick at all.


Using a fly cutter on a cast iron pan? *blink*
 
2021-01-25 10:31:03 PM  

Percise1: rohar: EdwardTellerhands: pheelix: EdwardTellerhands: ...About 5 years ago cast iron  collecting turned into a hobby for me. I come across a lot of high quality mid-20th Century unmarked American made cast iron when I'm hunting for the rarer stuff. If it's under $10 and isn't warped, pitted, or cracked I buy it no matter what. They're the ones I'll clean, season, and give to a relative or friend who says "I've always wanted to try cooking on cast iron".

Well, that's you, though. There are people who buy new Lodge skillets and resurface them, for whatever reason. Maybe they don't like having "used" stuff; who knows?

I'll gladly admit to buying new iron and resurfacing it.

Turns out I didn't have any iron griddles for my grill.  It's a big surface, so big griddles seemed necessary.  Found a couple of cheap Chinese 17" x 17" griddles online.

Iron's iron, so we're off to a good start.

But the surface was absolute ass.  Neat thing about liking to cook AND building race cars, there's a knee mill in the shop.

20 minutes later, they're perfectly smooth.  Fly cutters and polishing pads for the win.

After seasoning, they're like glass.  Might have overshot the goal.  Now I have to chase eggs around with the spatula 'cause they don't stick at all.

Using a fly cutter on a cast iron pan? *blink*


Uh, it's a 17" x 17" iron plate.  I don't have all day to fiddle fart around with a 3/4" end mill.  Toss a fly cutter in the mill at about 12 degrees sr and burn a quarter mil off.

Then buff until bored.

Rudimentary, sure.  But it gets the job done quickly and safely.
 
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