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(Guardian)   British firms exporting to the Continent advised to move to the EU to avoid Brexit costs. Fark: by the UK Government's Dept. for International Trade   (theguardian.com) divider line
    More: Ironic, European Union, International trade, United Kingdom, government trade advisers, Netherlands, separate companies, International Trade, Europe  
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889 clicks; posted to Politics » on 24 Jan 2021 at 12:20 AM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-01-23 6:25:47 PM  
Well at least Brexit got rid of those filthy foreigners
 
Xai [TotalFark]
2021-01-23 6:29:58 PM  

syrynxx: Well at least Brexit got rid of those filthy foreigners


You mean it increased the number of foreigners, right?
 
2021-01-23 8:00:26 PM  
And? Setting up subsidiary companies in overseas markets is common practice. That's why Amazon has huge warehouses in the UK to serve UK customers rather than post orders from the US.

It's why lots of EU companies are setting up UK subsidiaries for Brexit. They're doing the exact same thing.
 
Xai [TotalFark]
2021-01-23 9:35:40 PM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: And? Setting up subsidiary companies in overseas markets is common practice. That's why Amazon has huge warehouses in the UK to serve UK customers rather than post orders from the US.

It's why lots of EU companies are setting up UK subsidiaries for Brexit. They're doing the exact same thing.


While I agree with your assessment of what is happening, I think you seem to avoid a conclusion, instead merely implying that it is no big deal. For small businesses that can't afford to set up subsidiaries this will be a very bad situation and even those that are large enough to warrant such action, if a customer is faced with the choice of doing business directly with an EU based business or via a foreign subsidiary that has to deal with red tape, it leaves British companies at a noticeable disadvantage.

Overall its negative, but not catastrophically bad, though certainly not inconsequential as you appear to imply.

On a separate note, I think you'll agree we certainly chose the worst possible time to give ourselves a trade disadvantage.
 
2021-01-23 10:14:45 PM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: And? Setting up subsidiary companies in overseas markets is common practice. That's why Amazon has huge warehouses in the UK to serve UK customers rather than post orders from the US.

It's why lots of EU companies are setting up UK subsidiaries for Brexit. They're doing the exact same thing.


Great, raising costs for everyone across the board, passing it on to the consumer and squeezing out firms that can't do this. That's farking brilliant.
 
2021-01-24 12:22:36 AM  
i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2021-01-24 12:22:51 AM  

Xai: syrynxx: Well at least Brexit got rid of those filthy foreigners

You mean it increased the number of foreigners, right?


Thatsthejoke.jpg
 
2021-01-24 12:26:05 AM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: And? Setting up subsidiary companies in overseas markets is common practice. That's why Amazon has huge warehouses in the UK to serve UK customers rather than post orders from the US.

It's why lots of EU companies are setting up UK subsidiaries for Brexit. They're doing the exact same thing.


The point being it's a colossal pain that wasn't necessary until the UK snit-fit.
 
2021-01-24 12:28:22 AM  
My hovercraft is fulla jellied eels.
 
2021-01-24 12:29:17 AM  

Smoking GNU: Xai: syrynxx: Well at least Brexit got rid of those filthy foreigners

You mean it increased the number of foreigners, right?

Thatsthejoke.jpg


Came here for this, leaving happily.
 
2021-01-24 12:34:20 AM  
starecat.comView Full Size
 
2021-01-24 12:36:12 AM  

Xai: While I agree with your assessment of what is happening, I think you seem to avoid a conclusion, instead merely implying that it is no big deal. For small businesses that can't afford to set up subsidiaries this will be a very bad situation and even those that are large enough to warrant such action, if a customer is faced with the choice of doing business directly with an EU based business or via a foreign subsidiary that has to deal with red tape, it leaves British companies at a noticeable disadvantage.


How so? If I buy something from Amazon, a subsidiary of a foreign company, rather than from Argos, a British company who can also offer ultra fast delivery, where am I disadvantaged?

Xai: Overall its negative, but not catastrophically bad, though certainly not inconsequential as you appear to imply.


I think it will turn out inconsequential, and then a positive once we start trading under TPP etc. It's noticeable that the media, and many Farkers, are making a huge deal about the problems in the fishing industry. But a month or two ago they were saying that fishing is a fraction of one percent of the UK GDP, it's hardly worth bothering about etc.
But now that there's a problem they're talking as if the entire UK economy is based on fishing and so we're screwed.
The Nissan CEO has just said the trade deal is great and that for them filling out another form is "nothing".

The Brexit deal has added new customs paperwork, but Gupta argued the costs were "peanuts" compared with the effects of the Covid pandemic or natural disasters. "For a global manufacturer who is running 150 markets and 14 plants around the world, to have additional documentation, to fill in a form at the border, is nothing," Gupta said.

And once small companies get to grips with the paperwork they'll do fine. After all, many such small companies already trade with the rest of the world and do that paperwork. I used to work with a modest, family owned, retailer and they bought some stuff direct from China and had to do all the customs, shipping, insurance etc paperwork themselves, but it was worth it.

Plus, of course, four years ago many Farkers were saying it would be utter disaster, the UK was totally screwed, all the banks and multinationals would have left long before Brexit actually happened, millions of jobs lost, people literally starving, people dying because there was no medicine etc etc. But we've left and Fark had to make a big deal of a truck driver having his ham sandwich confiscated.

Xai: On a separate note, I think you'll agree we certainly chose the worst possible time to give ourselves a trade disadvantage.


We were committed to the timetable long before Covid hit. Another delay and some Farkers would have been "Another delay?" and posted that cat meme again, and the Star Trek one.

It's almost a month into the "chaos" and I'm still buying lots of fresh food in my local supermarket. I bought a pack of fresh strawberries from Spain last night. We're not starving yet....
 
2021-01-24 12:39:21 AM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: And? Setting up subsidiary companies in overseas markets is common practice. That's why Amazon has huge warehouses in the UK to serve UK customers rather than post orders from the US.

It's why lots of EU companies are setting up UK subsidiaries for Brexit. They're doing the exact same thing.


Well, then we should set up enforced tariff boundaries between Yorkshire and Kent and Gloucester and Dorcet.  Think of all the important jobs that would create.
 
2021-01-24 12:39:58 AM  

Scorpitron is reduced to a thin red paste: Carter Pewterschmidt: And? Setting up subsidiary companies in overseas markets is common practice. That's why Amazon has huge warehouses in the UK to serve UK customers rather than post orders from the US.

It's why lots of EU companies are setting up UK subsidiaries for Brexit. They're doing the exact same thing.

Great, raising costs for everyone across the board, passing it on to the consumer and squeezing out firms that can't do this. That's farking brilliant.


I asked you in another thread to name banks that have "left the UK" as you claimed.

You posted a ling to an article that mentioned banks that had opened small satellite offices in the EU, hardly the same thing.

So can you name these banks you claim have "left the UK"?
 
2021-01-24 12:42:12 AM  

Scorpitron is reduced to a thin red paste: Carter Pewterschmidt: And? Setting up subsidiary companies in overseas markets is common practice. That's why Amazon has huge warehouses in the UK to serve UK customers rather than post orders from the US.

It's why lots of EU companies are setting up UK subsidiaries for Brexit. They're doing the exact same thing.

Great, raising costs for everyone across the board, passing it on to the consumer and squeezing out firms that can't do this. That's farking brilliant.


Carter will never be tired of winning.
 
2021-01-24 12:42:27 AM  

TheSubjunctive: Carter Pewterschmidt: And? Setting up subsidiary companies in overseas markets is common practice. That's why Amazon has huge warehouses in the UK to serve UK customers rather than post orders from the US.

It's why lots of EU companies are setting up UK subsidiaries for Brexit. They're doing the exact same thing.

Well, then we should set up enforced tariff boundaries between Yorkshire and Kent and Gloucester and Dorcet.  Think of all the important jobs that would create.


Well Scots appear to be planning that exact thing, a hard border, full passport checks, customs checks etc, between England and Scotland, so lets see how that works out for them. Plus of course Scots losing the right to live and work in England.
 
2021-01-24 12:44:19 AM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: Xai: While I agree with your assessment of what is happening, I think you seem to avoid a conclusion, instead merely implying that it is no big deal. For small businesses that can't afford to set up subsidiaries this will be a very bad situation and even those that are large enough to warrant such action, if a customer is faced with the choice of doing business directly with an EU based business or via a foreign subsidiary that has to deal with red tape, it leaves British companies at a noticeable disadvantage.

How so? If I buy something from Amazon, a subsidiary of a foreign company, rather than from Argos, a British company who can also offer ultra fast delivery, where am I disadvantaged?

Xai: Overall its negative, but not catastrophically bad, though certainly not inconsequential as you appear to imply.

I think it will turn out inconsequential, and then a positive once we start trading under TPP etc. It's noticeable that the media, and many Farkers, are making a huge deal about the problems in the fishing industry. But a month or two ago they were saying that fishing is a fraction of one percent of the UK GDP, it's hardly worth bothering about etc.
But now that there's a problem they're talking as if the entire UK economy is based on fishing and so we're screwed.
The Nissan CEO has just said the trade deal is great and that for them filling out another form is "nothing".

The Brexit deal has added new customs paperwork, but Gupta argued the costs were "peanuts" compared with the effects of the Covid pandemic or natural disasters. "For a global manufacturer who is running 150 markets and 14 plants around the world, to have additional documentation, to fill in a form at the border, is nothing," Gupta said.

And once small companies get to grips with the paperwork they'll do fine. After all, many such small companies already trade with the rest of the world and do that paperwork. I used to work with a modest, family owned, retailer and they bought some stuff direct from China and had to do all the customs, shipping, insurance etc paperwork themselves, but it was worth it.

Plus, of course, four years ago many Farkers were saying it would be utter disaster, the UK was totally screwed, all the banks and multinationals would have left long before Brexit actually happened, millions of jobs lost, people literally starving, people dying because there was no medicine etc etc. But we've left and Fark had to make a big deal of a truck driver having his ham sandwich confiscated.

Xai: On a separate note, I think you'll agree we certainly chose the worst possible time to give ourselves a trade disadvantage.

We were committed to the timetable long before Covid hit. Another delay and some Farkers would have been "Another delay?" and posted that cat meme again, and the Star Trek one.

It's almost a month into the "chaos" and I'm still buying lots of fresh food in my local supermarket. I bought a pack of fresh strawberries from Spain last night. We're not starving yet....


You are posting a wall of text, arguing politics on a tiny site like fark.com, at 530am on Sunday morning.  Go to bed man.

Is there someone you can talk to about your life?  Maybe your GP can recommend something.  Maybe a hobby that can take your mind off of things.
 
2021-01-24 12:46:03 AM  

Erik_Emune: Carter Pewterschmidt: And? Setting up subsidiary companies in overseas markets is common practice. That's why Amazon has huge warehouses in the UK to serve UK customers rather than post orders from the US.

It's why lots of EU companies are setting up UK subsidiaries for Brexit. They're doing the exact same thing.

The point being it's a colossal pain that wasn't necessary until the UK snit-fit.


Freedom isn't free. Democracy and sovereignty is worth a modest cost.

Tony Benn - EU Referendum - EU Empire - Democracy - Brexit
Youtube nWnpbEMMsNw


I dare say Ireland had lots of short term problems after they left the UK (though we let them off their share of the UK debt) and Scotland would have far far more problems if they got independence.

Are you saying Scotland shouldn't want independence because of the short term problems they'd have?
 
2021-01-24 12:47:47 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-01-24 12:49:43 AM  

Brokenseas: You are posting a wall of text, arguing politics on a tiny site like fark.com, at 530am on Sunday morning.  Go to bed man.

Is there someone you can talk to about your life?  Maybe your GP can recommend something.  Maybe a hobby that can take your mind off of things.


Funny that Americans can post endlessly in Brexit threads when it doesn't affect them at all, and no one tells them to get a life, but someone who actually lives here and is directly affected shouldn't have an opinion?

I think your take on this is rather bizarre. You should be asking Americans why they are posting in these threads. You should be telling them to get a life.

I have an opinion because I live here. Why shouldn't I try to explain the facts to people who don't live here and know what they are talking about?
 
2021-01-24 12:55:38 AM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: Scorpitron is reduced to a thin red paste: Carter Pewterschmidt: And? Setting up subsidiary companies in overseas markets is common practice. That's why Amazon has huge warehouses in the UK to serve UK customers rather than post orders from the US.

It's why lots of EU companies are setting up UK subsidiaries for Brexit. They're doing the exact same thing.

Great, raising costs for everyone across the board, passing it on to the consumer and squeezing out firms that can't do this. That's farking brilliant.

I asked you in another thread to name banks that have "left the UK" as you claimed.

You posted a ling to an article that mentioned banks that had opened small satellite offices in the EU, hardly the same thing.

So can you name these banks you claim have "left the UK"?


Well unless Fortune magazine has turned into the National Enquirer.

https://fortune.com/2020/10/01/banks-​t​rillions-jobs-brexit-move/ 1.6 trillion in assets and 7500 jobs moved to the EU.

Or Bloomberg.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articl​e​s/2020-09-30/brexit-prompts-7-500-fina​nce-jobs-1-6-trillion-to-leave-u-k
 
2021-01-24 12:58:05 AM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: Brokenseas: You are posting a wall of text, arguing politics on a tiny site like fark.com, at 530am on Sunday morning.  Go to bed man.

Is there someone you can talk to about your life?  Maybe your GP can recommend something.  Maybe a hobby that can take your mind off of things.

Funny that Americans can post endlessly in Brexit threads when it doesn't affect them at all, and no one tells them to get a life, but someone who actually lives here and is directly affected shouldn't have an opinion?

I think your take on this is rather bizarre. You should be asking Americans why they are posting in these threads. You should be telling them to get a life.

I have an opinion because I live here. Why shouldn't I try to explain the facts to people who don't live here and know what they are talking about?


I have a fair amount of friends from the UK, born and raised, who are fairly well off, and they all hate Brexit with the passion of 1000 burning nuns(I mean to type nuns).

The only two Yay Brexiteers are two not native born ones. You and a chick who married into money.
 
Xai [TotalFark]
2021-01-24 1:05:50 AM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: Xai: While I agree with your assessment of what is happening, I think you seem to avoid a conclusion, instead merely implying that it is no big deal. For small businesses that can't afford to set up subsidiaries this will be a very bad situation and even those that are large enough to warrant such action, if a customer is faced with the choice of doing business directly with an EU based business or via a foreign subsidiary that has to deal with red tape, it leaves British companies at a noticeable disadvantage.


How so? If I buy something from Amazon, a subsidiary of a foreign company, rather than from Argos, a British company who can also offer ultra fast delivery, where am I disadvantaged?


Because when you buy from amazon in the UK you are buying from amazon UK. If you try to buy from Amazon FR (which you can) you'd expect heavy delays on wait times and additional fees.

You've literally proved my point because faced with a choice of buying from France via a subsidiary (amazon FR) and buying from the UK, you'll always choose the UK company due to delivery speed and costs.

Unless British businesses literally move their entire exporting business to the EU (i.e. make 'argos FR' for example) and source and supply from France to french customers, then there will be a disadvantage.
 
2021-01-24 1:06:23 AM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: And? Setting up subsidiary companies in overseas markets is common practice. That's why Amazon has huge warehouses in the UK to serve UK customers rather than post orders from the US.

It's why lots of EU companies are setting up UK subsidiaries for Brexit. They're doing the exact same thing.


i.kym-cdn.comView Full Size


Really. One can make change *inside* an org far easier than being outside. And if you are smart, would know this.
Your choice - stupid or disingenuous . The choice is yours- don't be late .
I know how you choose because I watch people
 
2021-01-24 1:14:51 AM  
Brexit is the Windows 8 of economic maneuvers.
 
Xai [TotalFark]
2021-01-24 1:16:28 AM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: I think it will turn out inconsequential, and then a positive once we start trading under TPP etc. It's noticeable that the media, and many Farkers, are making a huge deal about the problems in the fishing industry. But a month or two ago they were saying that fishing is a fraction of one percent of the UK GDP, it's hardly worth bothering about etc.
But now that there's a problem they're talking as if the entire UK economy is based on fishing and so we're screwed.
The Nissan CEO has just said the trade deal is great and that for them filling out another form is "nothing".


I totally agree the fishing industry is inconsequential but it's just amusing that they were some of the most fervent brexit supporters and have been hit the hardest.

As for Nissan, that's a great outcome and yes, for something like vehicles it will be good and it's easy to see why: You're not going to be able to simply switch to another rubbish nissan juke manufactured in France or whatever if Nissan don't have a factory there, unlike things like shellfish where you can literally buy the exact same product landed at an EU port (often from the exact same fishing boats) and more importantly, the cost of customs checks relative to the cost of a £15,000 vehicle are virtually nothing, but the cost of customs checks relative to a £30 kilo of scallops? Far more significant.
 
2021-01-24 1:16:42 AM  

Medic Zero: Scorpitron is reduced to a thin red paste: Carter Pewterschmidt: And? Setting up subsidiary companies in overseas markets is common practice. That's why Amazon has huge warehouses in the UK to serve UK customers rather than post orders from the US.

It's why lots of EU companies are setting up UK subsidiaries for Brexit. They're doing the exact same thing.

Great, raising costs for everyone across the board, passing it on to the consumer and squeezing out firms that can't do this. That's farking brilliant.

Carter will never be tired of winning.


So long as he gets to keep blowing the dog whistle.
 
2021-01-24 1:18:30 AM  
media1.tenor.comView Full Size
 
2021-01-24 1:41:24 AM  

Discordulator: Medic Zero: Scorpitron is reduced to a thin red paste: Carter Pewterschmidt: And? Setting up subsidiary companies in overseas markets is common practice. That's why Amazon has huge warehouses in the UK to serve UK customers rather than post orders from the US.

It's why lots of EU companies are setting up UK subsidiaries for Brexit. They're doing the exact same thing.

Great, raising costs for everyone across the board, passing it on to the consumer and squeezing out firms that can't do this. That's farking brilliant.

Carter will never be tired of winning.

So long as he gets to keep blowing the dog whistle.


You gotta wonder if someone is paying him to be a shill. It's what, 5am over there right now?
 
2021-01-24 1:41:55 AM  
Six months after, Tories will be promising to bring back all those jobs that those bloody foreigners offshored.
 
2021-01-24 1:54:30 AM  
Taken in a Belfast supermarket a few days ago
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-01-24 2:14:19 AM  

Medic Zero: Discordulator: Medic Zero: Scorpitron is reduced to a thin red paste: Carter Pewterschmidt: And? Setting up subsidiary companies in overseas markets is common practice. That's why Amazon has huge warehouses in the UK to serve UK customers rather than post orders from the US.

It's why lots of EU companies are setting up UK subsidiaries for Brexit. They're doing the exact same thing.

Great, raising costs for everyone across the board, passing it on to the consumer and squeezing out firms that can't do this. That's farking brilliant.

Carter will never be tired of winning.

So long as he gets to keep blowing the dog whistle.

You gotta wonder if someone is paying him to be a shill. It's what, 5am over there right now?


10:14 in Russia.
 
2021-01-24 2:30:00 AM  

theflatline: Medic Zero: Discordulator: Medic Zero: Scorpitron is reduced to a thin red paste: Carter Pewterschmidt: And? Setting up subsidiary companies in overseas markets is common practice. That's why Amazon has huge warehouses in the UK to serve UK customers rather than post orders from the US.

It's why lots of EU companies are setting up UK subsidiaries for Brexit. They're doing the exact same thing.

Great, raising costs for everyone across the board, passing it on to the consumer and squeezing out firms that can't do this. That's farking brilliant.

Carter will never be tired of winning.

So long as he gets to keep blowing the dog whistle.

You gotta wonder if someone is paying him to be a shill. It's what, 5am over there right now?

10:14 in Russia.


2:29 PM in Novosibirsk...2:29 AM in Norfolk, Ontario. Faites vos jeux
 
2021-01-24 2:39:51 AM  
Ah a new phase.. 'Well of course it is a vast bureaucratic nightmare, that is just how things work. Tiny companies with 4 employees should be delighted to set up a European subsidiary at great cost in order to sell their niche goods to the colossal market that was freely available to them until we farked it up. If this is uneconomic then they should be thrilled to shut up shop in the knowledge that passports are blue again!'
 
2021-01-24 3:35:54 AM  
It's not just about setting up subsidiaries on the continent. It means laying off people in the UK instead.
And it means playing by EU rules, getting away from was the whole bloody purpose of motherf*cking Brexit.

It's such a disaster that it won't take long and the Tory coonts will have to make big concessions in order to make trade smoother. And again be subject to EU regulations in return.
 
2021-01-24 4:14:32 AM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: And? Setting up subsidiary companies in overseas markets is common practice. That's why Amazon has huge warehouses in the UK to serve UK customers rather than post orders from the US.

It's why lots of EU companies are setting up UK subsidiaries for Brexit. They're doing the exact same thing.


Lots of services companies which were serving the entire EU from their UK office are now serving them from a EU-based one, and kept a (smaller) office open in the UK for British customers. Both my brokers (one British, one American) have done this.

That's income for which they now pay tax elsewhere. And they've laid off some UK staff.
 
2021-01-24 4:30:32 AM  

ParallelUniverseParking: Taken in a Belfast supermarket a few days ago
[Fark user image 850x480]


So much empty green basket to choose from! lol
Fark user imageView Full Size

/running low on cardboard box though, need to get more from the back
 
2021-01-24 4:35:44 AM  
My suppliers already moved. Some to Ireland, others to Germany, one of all places to Austria. That's about 9 companies with sales in the many billions.

What's the problem, you say?

No problem actually, all this money and the taxes on it will be paid in Europe now, and UK will see none of it.
 
2021-01-24 4:39:57 AM  

Boo_Guy: ParallelUniverseParking: Taken in a Belfast supermarket a few days ago
[Fark user image 850x480]

So much empty green basket to choose from! lol
[Fark user image image 850x480]
/running low on cardboard box though, need to get more from the back


encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.comView Full Size
 
2021-01-24 4:44:09 AM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: And? Setting up subsidiary companies in overseas markets is common practice. That's why Amazon has huge warehouses in the UK to serve UK customers rather than post orders from the US.

It's why lots of EU companies are setting up UK subsidiaries for Brexit. They're doing the exact same thing.


Yes, doing a thing that costs money and sees some of their tax income get paid to a foreign country.

A thing that is going to considerable increase the costs of small business owners.

An extra cost that was completely and utterly unnecessary until some we left the UK.  At a time when small businesses are already under pressure from multinational competitors.

But hey, winning!  

Remind me again, what is the actual *benefit* these business get from us being out of the EU?
 
2021-01-24 4:50:47 AM  
Has the text waterfall of stupid appeared telling us how infact this is an actual triumph for Brexit and how successful it's proving to be.
(Thick wanker that he is)
 
2021-01-24 4:58:13 AM  

Zenith: Has the text waterfall of stupid appeared telling us how infact this is an actual triumph for Brexit and how successful it's proving to be.
(Thick wanker that he is)


Strangely enough, he's been far more selective on the threads he participates in, since the effects of Brexit are not theoretical anymore.
 
2021-01-24 4:58:30 AM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: Erik_Emune: Carter Pewterschmidt: And? Setting up subsidiary companies in overseas markets is common practice. That's why Amazon has huge warehouses in the UK to serve UK customers rather than post orders from the US.

It's why lots of EU companies are setting up UK subsidiaries for Brexit. They're doing the exact same thing.

The point being it's a colossal pain that wasn't necessary until the UK snit-fit.

Freedom isn't free. Democracy and sovereignty is worth a modest cost.

[YouTube video: Tony Benn - EU Referendum - EU Empire - Democracy - Brexit]

I dare say Ireland had lots of short term problems after they left the UK (though we let them off their share of the UK debt) and Scotland would have far far more problems if they got independence.

Are you saying Scotland shouldn't want independence because of the short term problems they'd have?


Scotland only wants independence from us. Once independence is gained Scotland will be doing everything in its power to rejoin the EU. So, if an independent Scotland can be both an EU member and sovereign why the fark did the UK leave in the first place???
 
2021-01-24 5:06:57 AM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: TheSubjunctive: Carter Pewterschmidt: And? Setting up subsidiary companies in overseas markets is common practice. That's why Amazon has huge warehouses in the UK to serve UK customers rather than post orders from the US.

It's why lots of EU companies are setting up UK subsidiaries for Brexit. They're doing the exact same thing.

Well, then we should set up enforced tariff boundaries between Yorkshire and Kent and Gloucester and Dorcet.  Think of all the important jobs that would create.

Well Scots appear to be planning that exact thing, a hard border, full passport checks, customs checks etc, between England and Scotland, so lets see how that works out for them. Plus of course Scots losing the right to live and work in England.


Scotland planned to keep all borders open by retaining EU membership via UK membership. Some much more populus country just to the south farked that up completely. The best deal for both countries would be to grow up and re enter the European Trade Community as a full partner again. That won't happen ofc because England is still having a shiat fit about people with funny accents living here. So sad, too bad.
 
2021-01-24 5:17:44 AM  
Well, I guess it's back to peat farming!
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-01-24 5:28:16 AM  
You'd have to have a heart of stone not to laugh at the Express and the lengths they go to paint that mess as some sort of victory:

Fark user imageView Full Size


You rock, Gov UK. Thanks for the jobs and taxes!
 
2021-01-24 5:35:14 AM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: It's noticeable that the media, and many Farkers, are making a huge deal about the problems in the fishing industry. But a month or two ago they were saying that fishing is a fraction of one percent of the UK GDP, it's hardly worth bothering about etc.


Brexiteers were making a big deal about fishing for years, talking it up as a major part of the economy, and promising that Brexit would  be a huge advantage for the British fishing industry. Now it turns out they were very, very wrong about that, and that's why it's getting  a lot of attention; it's a glaring example of just how much bullshiat they've been feeding you.
 
2021-01-24 5:37:19 AM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: And? Setting up subsidiary companies in overseas markets is common practice. That's why Amazon has huge warehouses in the UK to serve UK customers rather than post orders from the US.

It's why lots of EU companies are setting up UK subsidiaries for Brexit. They're doing the exact same thing.


Is it tiring for you to come into all these Brexit threads to defend brexit?  You must refresh Fark 20 times a day (F5, Ctrl+F 'Brexit').

You probably have all responses to all possible arguments regarding Brexit all bookmarked on your web browser, don't you?  Heh...
 
2021-01-24 5:42:25 AM  

Paddy: You'd have to have a heart of stone not to laugh at the Express and the lengths they go to paint that mess as some sort of victory:

[Fark user image 425x332]

You rock, Gov UK. Thanks for the jobs and taxes!


Shaking my head. Dear farking Christ.

Next they'll sell this as the UK "taking over the EU" with cunning investments.
 
2021-01-24 6:18:44 AM  

PartTimeBuddha: Paddy: You'd have to have a heart of stone not to laugh at the Express and the lengths they go to paint that mess as some sort of victory:

[Fark user image 425x332]

You rock, Gov UK. Thanks for the jobs and taxes!

Shaking my head. Dear farking Christ.

Next they'll sell this as the UK "taking over the EU" with cunning investments.


When we eventually rejoin the single market (which is inevitable, although after several years of hurt), they will sell it as "27 more countries take up associate membership of the United Kingdom".
 
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