Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Food 52)   There are five mother sauces, not counting jokes about subby's mom. What is the best sauce of your own creation, daughter or otherwise?   (food52.com) divider line
    More: Survey, Sauce, French mother sauces, Tomato sauce, tomato sauce, Roux, slew of otherclassics, basic formulas, Ketchup  
•       •       •

654 clicks; posted to Food » on 23 Jan 2021 at 9:32 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



64 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2021-01-23 6:49:13 AM  
I think I have this page bookmarks on PornHub?
 
2021-01-23 7:01:32 AM  
I made some demi glace from beef shank, chicken wings, and a crapton of veggies.  Holy crap is it awesome.
 
2021-01-23 7:32:10 AM  
Back when I was a chef in the mid nineties, I made a Gorganzola sauce that was served on top of two 4oz. filets with a grilled shrimp on top of each and served on a bed of spinach. I called the dish "The Cab Calloway" because it was a different take on a dish from a Food and Wine cookbook that called their version Tournedoes Louis Armstrong. Theirs had a brown sauce and was not served on the bed of blanched spinach.

The presentation on the plate was pleasing with the contrast of colors.
 
2021-01-23 7:33:25 AM  
I make a great red sauce.  Lots of garlic, a couple anchovies, good tomato paste, and a splash of red wine are key.
 
2021-01-23 7:41:32 AM  
Bull's Eye BBQ and Kikkoman Teriyaki sauce. 50/50 mix of both.
 
2021-01-23 7:44:50 AM  
usmilitariaforum.comView Full Size
 
2021-01-23 7:47:25 AM  
I have a blackberry demi that is pretty damn fine, but the sauce I'm most proud of was born out of sheer randomness.

When I was at Christopher's Brassiere in Phoenix as poissonniere, I was constantly bombarded with random ingredients. Saute was as well, but I never knew what fish we'd be serving pretty much until I got there, because Chef Grosse went to market in the morning and bought what caught his eye. So, one day it would be tuna, or mussels, or clams, or ono. I also tended to get the end of the grab-bag box from the farm share that we had, so I was often left to try to figure out how to incorporate ingredients in the presentation or in the dish itself.

One day I came in, and found on my shelf some lovely scallops. Just plump and amazing. I paired them with a nice risotto and some lovely greens to make a colorful salad with very tiny carrots, scallion, radishes, and a few cherry tomatoes sized pineapple tomatoes. These things were amazing. Wee yellow tomatoes and they combined a bit of the tart of a tomato with a strong pineapple finish. I had the whole thing prepped and ready to go, with a beurre blanc with a bit of lemon zest and a touch of chiltepin pepper, just to remind folks that they were eating seafood in the South West. And I was ready to write my menu to print, with the other goodies that got dropped on my shelf.

That's when the exec dropped a couple of pints of beets on me. Golden and candycane. "Can you incorporate these in tonight? Our farm share guy is coming in, and Chef wants these somewhere, and Grill and saute have already finished their menus. Oh, and I need your's in twenty minutes."

Ok, so it was scramble mode. Luckily, they were all fairly small beets, so the goldens and about a third of the candycane beets went into water immediately. While they were rolling towards a boil, I pulled out the veloute that I'd done the day before, and then found some MOAR lemons and began the remaining candycane beets transformation to garnish. I finished just in time to write a quick description of what I HOPED pulled together, since it was pure invention at the time, and lo, the exec came around to collect the menu, just as the beets came off the stove. The sauce was a bit of a scramble. I buzzed the beets into a puree, and then had to thin out the veloute with a bit more stock, plus the added lemon and a bit of ginger and lemongrass, and I already had the chiltepin peppers ready to go, so that was easy, and I had lemons enough on station to zest as we rolled along. I pulled it all together for chef's call, and it turned out lovely. The veloute left the sauce with a velvety consistency that belied the puree of beets, the ginger and the lemongrass, along with the sweet of the beets, and veloute counterpointed them to keep them from being overwhelmingly sweet, but just enough to make the scallops pop. A bed of risotto, the salad to the north, seared scallops laid over the risotto, and a drape of this bastard beet veloute, and garnished with the lemon zest and chiltepin finely diced. Sweet, savory, a little spice, the bite of citrus, the clean sea taste of scallops, with a rich risotto accepting the juices from the scallops and the beet veloute, and it all just worked. Sheer random grab-bag, and it's one the dishes I'm most proud of out my career, because of how quickly it all pulled together, and how much of a sh*tshow it could have turned out.

Chef Grosse rarely gave praise. Or, to be fair, much in the way of condemnation either. He tasted something, he nodded and moved on, or he took a look and took the pan and threw it away immediately and you had to start again. Saw the saute guy have that happen, in the middle of a rush, and he never yelled, he's just say, "do it right next time." He was just super exact in what he expected from everyone, and if you asked him for advice, he was a font of knowledge, but you'd best TAKE that advice if you asked, or there'd be hell to pay. On that particular day, Chef Grosse tasted the scallops, took a moment, nodded, and then took the plate to sit down with it for himself and our sommelier. He described it for the staff, but took it for himself for a pre-service snack, which was about the highest compliment you could get at the joint.
 
2021-01-23 7:52:28 AM  
Oh, sure, but when I hit the sauce, suddenly I'm the drunk.
 
2021-01-23 8:23:50 AM  
external-content.duckduckgo.comView Full Size

I'm here to make five mother sauces.
 
2021-01-23 8:55:12 AM  
I HAD to Rewrite Wikipedia's Sauce Article (Series Finale)
Youtube pMXvAjH0Nco
 
2021-01-23 9:37:16 AM  
I've lately been adding fruit to my pan sauces.

For example, you can cook a half-stalk of rhubarb in the pan, next to the meat.  That's just enough time to soften it up.  Then while the meat is resting, deglaze and mash the rhubarb.  Then strain.
 
2021-01-23 9:59:04 AM  

hubiestubert: I have a blackberry demi that is pretty damn fine, but the sauce I'm most proud of was born out of sheer randomness.

When I was at Christopher's Brassiere in Phoenix as poissonniere, I was constantly bombarded with random ingredients. Saute was as well, but I never knew what fish we'd be serving pretty much until I got there, because Chef Grosse went to market in the morning and bought what caught his eye. So, one day it would be tuna, or mussels, or clams, or ono. I also tended to get the end of the grab-bag box from the farm share that we had, so I was often left to try to figure out how to incorporate ingredients in the presentation or in the dish itself.

One day I came in, and found on my shelf some lovely scallops. Just plump and amazing. I paired them with a nice risotto and some lovely greens to make a colorful salad with very tiny carrots, scallion, radishes, and a few cherry tomatoes sized pineapple tomatoes. These things were amazing. Wee yellow tomatoes and they combined a bit of the tart of a tomato with a strong pineapple finish. I had the whole thing prepped and ready to go, with a beurre blanc with a bit of lemon zest and a touch of chiltepin pepper, just to remind folks that they were eating seafood in the South West. And I was ready to write my menu to print, with the other goodies that got dropped on my shelf.

That's when the exec dropped a couple of pints of beets on me. Golden and candycane. "Can you incorporate these in tonight? Our farm share guy is coming in, and Chef wants these somewhere, and Grill and saute have already finished their menus. Oh, and I need your's in twenty minutes."

Ok, so it was scramble mode. Luckily, they were all fairly small beets, so the goldens and about a third of the candycane beets went into water immediately. While they were rolling towards a boil, I pulled out the veloute that I'd done the day before, and then found some MOAR lemons and began the remaining candycane beets transformation to garnish. I finished just in time to write a quick description of what I HOPED pulled together, since it was pure invention at the time, and lo, the exec came around to collect the menu, just as the beets came off the stove. The sauce was a bit of a scramble. I buzzed the beets into a puree, and then had to thin out the veloute with a bit more stock, plus the added lemon and a bit of ginger and lemongrass, and I already had the chiltepin peppers ready to go, so that was easy, and I had lemons enough on station to zest as we rolled along. I pulled it all together for chef's call, and it turned out lovely. The veloute left the sauce with a velvety consistency that belied the puree of beets, the ginger and the lemongrass, along with the sweet of the beets, and veloute counterpointed them to keep them from being overwhelmingly sweet, but just enough to make the scallops pop. A bed of risotto, the salad to the north, seared scallops laid over the risotto, and a drape of this bastard beet veloute, and garnished with the lemon zest and chiltepin finely diced. Sweet, savory, a little spice, the bite of citrus, the clean sea taste of scallops, with a rich risotto accepting the juices from the scallops and the beet veloute, and it all just worked. Sheer random grab-bag, and it's one the dishes I'm most proud of out my career, because of how quickly it all pulled together, and how much of a sh*tshow it could have turned out.

Chef Grosse rarely gave praise. Or, to be fair, much in the way of condemnation either. He tasted something, he nodded and moved on, or he took a look and took the pan and threw it away immediately and you had to start again. Saw the saute guy have that happen, in the middle of a rush, and he never yelled, he's just say, "do it right next time." He was just super exact in what he expected from everyone, and if you asked him for advice, he was a font of knowledge, but you'd best TAKE that advice if you asked, or there'd be hell to pay. On that particular day, Chef Grosse tasted the scallops, took a moment, nodded, and then took the plate to sit down with it for himself and our sommelier. He described it for the staff, but took it for himself for a pre-service snack, which was about the highest compliment you could get at the joint.


Marry me
 
2021-01-23 10:00:13 AM  
I made a homemade marachino cherry barbecue sauce for ribs 1,000 years ago when competing in an Iron Chef style ribs battle.  I don't remember how I did it, but it was great.  I did win.  :)

These days, simplicity is key.  1 part marsala, 1 part heavy cream, some butter, 1 minced shallot.  Bring to simmer, then allow to cool to slightly above room temperature.  Use to top grilled chicken breasts covered with a thin layer of goat cheese and mushrooms.  My take on Chicken Marsala.  Yum and very easy to do.  I can make it in 20 minutes; it's a good weeknight treat.
 
2021-01-23 10:07:16 AM  
This might have been important 200 years ago and refrigeration didn't exist and fresh meat and produce were rare.  But 50 years ago, nouvelle and California cuisines took over.  People want to actually taste the individual ingredients rather than bury them in some overpowered and fatty sauce.
 
2021-01-23 10:09:18 AM  
Not my "creations", but about every year I make a large batch of Worcestershire sauce and a large batch of New Mexico green chile sauce.
 
2021-01-23 10:19:34 AM  

This is a late parrot: Back when I was a chef in the mid nineties, I made a Gorganzola sauce that was served on top of two 4oz. filets with a grilled shrimp on top of each and served on a bed of spinach. I called the dish "The Cab Calloway"


*drooling intensifies*
 
2021-01-23 10:20:20 AM  

fark account name: This might have been important 200 years ago and refrigeration didn't exist and fresh meat and produce were rare.  But 50 years ago, nouvelle and California cuisines took over.  People want to actually taste the individual ingredients rather than bury them in some overpowered and fatty sauce.


Boo this man!
 
2021-01-23 10:22:39 AM  

foo monkey: I think I have this page bookmarks on PornHub?


Did they add this as a category now?

Is it different from "Step Bro Makes Step Sis A Special Sauce" category?

/asking for a friend obvi
 
2021-01-23 10:25:20 AM  

hubiestubert: I have a blackberry demi that is pretty damn fine, but the sauce I'm most proud of was born out of sheer randomness.

When I was at Christopher's Brassiere in Phoenix as poissonniere, I was constantly bombarded with random ingredients. Saute was as well, but I never knew what fish we'd be serving pretty much until I got there, because Chef Grosse went to market in the morning and bought what caught his eye. So, one day it would be tuna, or mussels, or clams, or ono. I also tended to get the end of the grab-bag box from the farm share that we had, so I was often left to try to figure out how to incorporate ingredients in the presentation or in the dish itself.

One day I came in, and found on my shelf some lovely scallops. Just plump and amazing. I paired them with a nice risotto and some lovely greens to make a colorful salad with very tiny carrots, scallion, radishes, and a few cherry tomatoes sized pineapple tomatoes. These things were amazing. Wee yellow tomatoes and they combined a bit of the tart of a tomato with a strong pineapple finish. I had the whole thing prepped and ready to go, with a beurre blanc with a bit of lemon zest and a touch of chiltepin pepper, just to remind folks that they were eating seafood in the South West. And I was ready to write my menu to print, with the other goodies that got dropped on my shelf.

That's when the exec dropped a couple of pints of beets on me. Golden and candycane. "Can you incorporate these in tonight? Our farm share guy is coming in, and Chef wants these somewhere, and Grill and saute have already finished their menus. Oh, and I need your's in twenty minutes."

Ok, so it was scramble mode. Luckily, they were all fairly small beets, so the goldens and about a third of the candycane beets went into water immediately. While they were rolling towards a boil, I pulled out the veloute that I'd done the day before, and then found some MOAR lemons and began the remaining candycane beets transformation to garnish. I finished just in time to write a quick description of what I HOPED pulled together, since it was pure invention at the time, and lo, the exec came around to collect the menu, just as the beets came off the stove. The sauce was a bit of a scramble. I buzzed the beets into a puree, and then had to thin out the veloute with a bit more stock, plus the added lemon and a bit of ginger and lemongrass, and I already had the chiltepin peppers ready to go, so that was easy, and I had lemons enough on station to zest as we rolled along. I pulled it all together for chef's call, and it turned out lovely. The veloute left the sauce with a velvety consistency that belied the puree of beets, the ginger and the lemongrass, along with the sweet of the beets, and veloute counterpointed them to keep them from being overwhelmingly sweet, but just enough to make the scallops pop. A bed of risotto, the salad to the north, seared scallops laid over the risotto, and a drape of this bastard beet veloute, and garnished with the lemon zest and chiltepin finely diced. Sweet, savory, a little spice, the bite of citrus, the clean sea taste of scallops, with a rich risotto accepting the juices from the scallops and the beet veloute, and it all just worked. Sheer random grab-bag, and it's one the dishes I'm most proud of out my career, because of how quickly it all pulled together, and how much of a sh*tshow it could have turned out.

Chef Grosse rarely gave praise. Or, to be fair, much in the way of condemnation either. He tasted something, he nodded and moved on, or he took a look and took the pan and threw it away immediately and you had to start again. Saw the saute guy have that happen, in the middle of a rush, and he never yelled, he's just say, "do it right next time." He was just super exact in what he expected from everyone, and if you asked him for advice, he was a font of knowledge, but you'd best TAKE that advice if you asked, or there'd be hell to pay. On that particular day, Chef Grosse tasted the scallops, took a moment, nodded, and then took the plate to sit down with it for himself and our sommelier. He described it for the staff, but took it for himself for a pre-service snack, which was about the highest compliment you could get at the joint.


I always enjoy your posts/stories.  You are one of my favorite Farkers.

/no snark
//worked in service industry for a decade
///glad to be out but miss the comradery
 
2021-01-23 10:32:25 AM  
I make a mock Bordelaise sauce with a saute of shallots, onions and mushrooms and some minced garlic, strained beef juices (from the sous vide bag). some red pepper flakes and some cheap red wine and reduce the heck out of it on a very low simmer.
 
2021-01-23 10:39:19 AM  
I think I learned yesterday that mayonaise is a mother sauce.  So there.
 
2021-01-23 10:40:57 AM  
I tried to discern by taste what was in this dressing served on a mango watercress salad I had while dining out. Chinese chili paste and white basalmic makes a nice blend.
I made a duck type sauce with equal parts apricot and rasberry jam with soy sauce and sriracha to taste.
Finally, I can't serve fried mushrooms w/o sour cream and ground horseradish. Simple I know.
 
2021-01-23 10:44:03 AM  
the American "taco sauce" in a jar is ketchup and hot sauce and cumin
 
2021-01-23 10:44:50 AM  
I worked with an engineer who fancied himself a gourmet chef.

While on a rural waterline project in north Arkansas, we had to eat somewhere for lunch. The nearest town had a "Daisy Queen," the Dairy Queen equivalent of "McDowells" I suppose.

This fellow orders some fried mushrooms, which I can't imagine being a local favorite, and had to be chipped out of the freezer.

When he received his order he asked the woman at the window, "Do you have any Bearnaise sauce?"

She looked at him for a second like the goof he was, and laughed with a toothless grin, "No, but we got some ketchup!"
 
2021-01-23 10:53:08 AM  
I always thought the number one mother sauce of France was ketchup.  You learn something new every day.
 
2021-01-23 10:58:21 AM  

ski9600: I think I learned yesterday that mayonaise is a mother sauce.  So there.


Not sauce ON your mother, fool!
 
2021-01-23 11:07:59 AM  

runwiz: I always thought the number one mother sauce of France was ketchup.  You learn something new every day.


It's for the Freedom Fries.
 
2021-01-23 11:12:09 AM  
You can make a fish stock velouté using clam juice. However since bottled clam juice costs around 3 times as much as a can of clams, I often just throw canned clams into a blender.
 
2021-01-23 11:12:55 AM  
In the 19th century, Marie-Antoine Carême anointed Bécham​el, Velouté, Espagnole, and tomato sauce as the building blocks for all other sauces in his work.

France is such a wussy country.  In the U.S., a man would be beat to death by his peers by age four if he were named "Marie."

Man up there, Frenchie.

/maybe his dad knew he'd have to get tough or die, and it's the name that helped to make him strong
 
2021-01-23 11:18:58 AM  

hubiestubert: When I was at Christopher's Brassiere in Phoenix


Fark is not your personal erotica site.

/At the next Fark get together, ask me to tell the story about our trip to Brasserie Balzar
 
2021-01-23 11:20:20 AM  

Dr.Fey: In the 19th century, Marie-Antoine Carême anointed Béchamel​, Velouté, Espagnole, and tomato sauce as the building blocks for all other sauces in his work.

France is such a wussy country.  In the U.S., a man would be beat to death by his peers by age four if he were named "Marie."

Man up there, Frenchie.

/maybe his dad knew he'd have to get tough or die, and it's the name that helped to make him strong


If you strike me I will SUE!
 
2021-01-23 11:21:04 AM  
Gorgonzola cream sauce on any kind of pasta topped with Cajun blackened chicken
 
2021-01-23 11:24:31 AM  
We didn't have time for a real Béarnaise so I made a quick roux with extra butter, tarragon, and white wine vinegar. That's the furthest reach my thimble of cooking expertise has gone.
 
2021-01-23 11:29:13 AM  

Dr.Fey: In the 19th century, Marie-Antoine Carême anointed Béchamel​, Velouté, Espagnole, and tomato sauce as the building blocks for all other sauces in his work.

France is such a wussy country.  In the U.S., a man would be beat to death by his peers by age four if he were named "Marie."

Man up there, Frenchie.

/maybe his dad knew he'd have to get tough or die, and it's the name that helped to make him strong


He should Sue.
 
2021-01-23 11:42:19 AM  

yakmans_dad: hubiestubert: When I was at Christopher's Brassiere in Phoenix

Fark is not your personal erotica site.

/At the next Fark get together, ask me to tell the story about our trip to Brasserie Balzar


Goddamn it. I never even realized that I got autocorrected.

*shakes a tiny fist inna air*
 
2021-01-23 11:51:37 AM  

hubiestubert: yakmans_dad: hubiestubert: When I was at Christopher's Brassiere in Phoenix

Fark is not your personal erotica site.

/At the next Fark get together, ask me to tell the story about our trip to Brasserie Balzar

Goddamn it. I never even realized that I got autocorrected.

*shakes a tiny fist inna air*


I mispronounced "I am a baker. I work in a bakery" in French, in Quebec and got giggles from the ladies at the bar.

Still got laid.
 
2021-01-23 12:03:42 PM  

Dr.Fey: In the U.S., a man would be beat to death by his peers by age four if he were named "Marie."

Man up there, Frenchie.


Fark user imageView Full Size


Nah, he'd just change it.
 
2021-01-23 12:50:57 PM  

ski9600: I think I learned yesterday that mayonaise is a mother sauce.  So there.


Catsup too.   I wonder if mustard feels left out
 
2021-01-23 1:55:16 PM  
Alfredo, sort of: Over low heat melt a stick of Kerry gold herb butter. Add a couple large cloves of garlic smashed to paste. Add a teaspoon or so anchovy paste, blend. cook on low heat a couple minutes and gradually add  half cup of flour. Allow roux to cook a few minutes but do not brown. Add a cup of half and half bit by bit. Gradually add milk until a thick velvety bechemal. Blend in a pint of sour cream. With sauce on a low simmer slowly stir in a grated 8 oz wedge of parmesan and repeat with a wedge of Romano. To stretch and lighten you can blend in a cup of pureed cauliflower. More cheese never hurts.
 
2021-01-23 2:49:22 PM  

fark account name: This might have been important 200 years ago and refrigeration didn't exist and fresh meat and produce were rare.  But 50 years ago, nouvelle and California cuisines took over.  People want to actually taste the individual ingredients rather than bury them in some overpowered and fatty sauce.


NO.
 
2021-01-23 3:03:28 PM  
I love sauces.  Condiments.  Pickles.  NOMS.

I make a pretty f*king outstanding mango tomatillo salsa.  And sometimes put green onion in my pico instead of white, and they macerate a little in the lime, and make friends with the cilantro... real good on an omelet.

I recently made a ginger/carrot/otherstuff salad dressing that was so good I was eating it with a spoon and sad I only made a quart and a half.  Probably should have written that one down.

The chili crisp I made for holiday presents is fairly bomb.  I know how to improve it, and every time I tweak it, it gets better.  Very aromatic, medium spice, unf.

Put a little chipotle powder in my hollandaise.  Serve on poached eggs on a bed of wilty spinach.  So breakfast.
 
2021-01-23 3:09:14 PM  
I would like to make my own doubanjiang, but I'm having trouble sourcing the basic f*cking ingredients.  Fresh erjingtao chiles, and dry fava beans.  I could Amazon the fava beans (expensive), or look for them next time I'm in Phoenix.  The cultures are actually easier to get my hands on.

SO of course this is the next thing I want fermenting in my house.  That and miso.  All the peppers I grew this year are bubbling away with no indication when they'll be done.
 
2021-01-23 3:35:05 PM  

Munden: [YouTube video: I HAD to Rewrite Wikipedia's Sauce Article (Series Finale)]


Wish I could smart this a couple dozen more times
 
2021-01-23 4:09:30 PM  

fark account name: This might have been important 200 years ago and refrigeration didn't exist and fresh meat and produce were rare.  But 50 years ago, nouvelle and California cuisines took over.  People want to actually taste the individual ingredients rather than bury them in some overpowered and fatty sauce.


Which is why sauciers look for balance.

You pair your sauce with the ingredients. You look to your ingredients strengths, and weaknesses. Not all sauces are fatty, nor overpowered. A GOOD bordelaise pairs well with rich meats because it's not overpowered. You can up the horsepower with a demi-glace, or marrow, but that's often gilding the lilly when you have a beef or pork. Plus, it can be a lovely mop to your potatoes, or mushrooms or even the combination of juice from your protein and the bordelaise can add to your vegetable side dish like asparagus or brussel sprouts. Mojo rojo is paprika, vinegar, cumin, garlic, chili, and sea salt, typically over potatoes. An arrabbiata is anything but terribly heavy. When you get into South Pacific, Chinese and Japanese sauces, you are often looking at thin but flavorful sauces that are designed to accompany a variety of dishes. When you get into the Middle East you are often looking at spices, lemon, and a tetch of olive oil. Quite light, yet often fiery or packed with flavor.

If you are thinking that all sauces are French and dairy-based, you're missing out on literally a whole world of sauces, from Mexico to South America, all across Europe, and even the French like their lighter sauces, same for Russia even, the Middle East, the variety in Africa is breathtaking, as in the same across India and the rest of Asia.

California and nouveau cuisine are examples of reinterpretations, but it wasn't the be-all and end-all. California cuisine is fifty years old. The current definition of nouveau cuisine--because the term goes back to damn near EVERY "revolution" in French cooking since the 1700s--is also about as old, and what was termed nouveau cuisine did have some influence on modern plating, the formula and the style has been pretty much abandoned by most chefs. Elements have been retained in modern styles, but that is true of damn near EVERY cuisine. You build on what those who came before you did. You learn from it, you give it your own twist, but in modern haute cuisine you have classic elements, as well as odd bits of fusion, experiments based on experience and curiosity. There are aberrations, like molecular gastronomy that are essentially chefs and their line cooks wanking off to try something really cool, and getting someone else to pay for it, but even that has sort of fallen to the wayside, or seen as a bit of hackery like putting micro-greens EVERYWHERE.

Fusion was hot for a while. People are still playing and experimenting, and coming up with ways to learn from OTHER cooking traditions and bring traditions closer. It's less rigidly defined at this point. And sauces aren't one singular style, or another, and are often influenced by a number of traditions. This is actually kind of a fun time to be in the game, despite the COVID because of the ability to play. And yes, build on what others have already done and learn their strengths and weaknesses.

Ideally, it's not about one thing or another, but balance. California and nouveau cuisine were both rigid in their definitions and specific styles. Chefs younger than sixty are less rigid in their processes. You borrow from classics, you borrow from street food, you reinterpret and you play a bit. It's important to understand the fundamentals of the cuisines you're borrowing from--to understand those strengths and weaknesses, as well as understand the techniques and flavors so that you CAN play--but unless you are doing purely Continental or pure Classical French, things are a bit freer than even those California cuisine folks imagined. And the idea that sauces are all thick and goopy and filled with dairy is...well, that's a definition that is about sixty years out of date. And yet, Continental and classic haute cuisine STILL exist, because they have their own strengths. And people love them.

Don't fight the love, brah. Don't fight the love.
 
2021-01-23 4:24:20 PM  

Munden: [YouTube video: I HAD to Rewrite Wikipedia's Sauce Article (Series Finale)]


Suddenly, I am aware that my bookshelf may not be entirely normal.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-01-23 4:28:30 PM  

hubiestubert: I have a blackberry demi that is pretty damn fine, but the sauce I'm most proud of was born out of sheer randomness.

When I was at Christopher's Brassiere in Phoenix as poissonniere, I was constantly bombarded with random ingredients. Saute was as well, but I never knew what fish we'd be serving pretty much until I got there, because Chef Grosse went to market in the morning and bought what caught his eye. So, one day it would be tuna, or mussels, or clams, or ono. I also tended to get the end of the grab-bag box from the farm share that we had, so I was often left to try to figure out how to incorporate ingredients in the presentation or in the dish itself.

One day I came in, and found on my shelf some lovely scallops. Just plump and amazing. I paired them with a nice risotto and some lovely greens to make a colorful salad with very tiny carrots, scallion, radishes, and a few cherry tomatoes sized pineapple tomatoes. These things were amazing. Wee yellow tomatoes and they combined a bit of the tart of a tomato with a strong pineapple finish. I had the whole thing prepped and ready to go, with a beurre blanc with a bit of lemon zest and a touch of chiltepin pepper, just to remind folks that they were eating seafood in the South West. And I was ready to write my menu to print, with the other goodies that got dropped on my shelf.

That's when the exec dropped a couple of pints of beets on me. Golden and candycane. "Can you incorporate these in tonight? Our farm share guy is coming in, and Chef wants these somewhere, and Grill and saute have already finished their menus. Oh, and I need your's in twenty minutes."

Ok, so it was scramble mode. Luckily, they were all fairly small beets, so the goldens and about a third of the candycane beets went into water immediately. While they were rolling towards a boil, I pulled out the veloute that I'd done the day before, and then found some MOAR lemons and began the remaining candycane beets transformation to garnish. I finishe ...


Dude, you really need to write a book.
 
2021-01-23 4:47:41 PM  

Munden: [iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/pMXvAjH0​Nco?autoplay=1&widget_referrer=https%3​A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&start=0&enablejsap​i=1&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&​widgetid=1]


Very interesting. I was thinking Hollandaise didn't feel like a mother sauce.
 
2021-01-23 5:07:30 PM  

dryknife: I worked with an engineer who fancied himself a gourmet chef.

While on a rural waterline project in north Arkansas, we had to eat somewhere for lunch. The nearest town had a "Daisy Queen," the Dairy Queen equivalent of "McDowells" I suppose.

This fellow orders some fried mushrooms, which I can't imagine being a local favorite, and had to be chipped out of the freezer.

When he received his order he asked the woman at the window, "Do you have any Bearnaise sauce?"

She looked at him for a second like the goof he was, and laughed with a toothless grin, "No, but we got some ketchup!"


The town just had to be Marshall.
 
2021-01-23 5:48:39 PM  
Cortez the Killer:  The town just had to be Marshall.

Fark user imageView Full Size


Yup.

Weren't nothin' to eat in Snowball.
 
2021-01-23 6:46:51 PM  
This is my go-to book for the classic sauces. It's very readable, interesting, and better organized than most textbooks.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
Displayed 50 of 64 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.