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(The Hill)   Tiny pipeline leak near nature preserve. Strike that, it was 4 times the size the company reported. Nearly 1.2 million gallons   (thehill.com) divider line
    More: Fail, North Carolina, Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, Leak, Natural gas, Charlotte, North Carolina, Colonial Pipeline, United States, North Carolina nature preserve  
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2431 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Jan 2021 at 5:49 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



27 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2021-01-22 4:37:19 PM  
So 1.2 million × $2.50
You would think a responsible company would notice they were literally pissing $3 million away a lot sooner.
 
2021-01-22 5:13:28 PM  

cretinbob: So 1.2 million × $2.50
You would think a responsible company would notice they were literally pissing $3 million away a lot sooner.


I'm certain they did.

They kept this pretty low in the news cycle by lying about the extent of damage.

I had vaguely heard about it here but I had no idea the extent of the actual issue because it is easy to shrug off when it's presented as 'nothing'.

But, it is something.
 
2021-01-22 5:47:59 PM  
Gas has a very high vapor pressure so it will stay around long. Just a historical perspective... when oil was first refined in the US, gas was considered a waste product that was dumped in the rivers.
 
2021-01-22 5:50:04 PM  

Hoblit: cretinbob: So 1.2 million × $2.50
You would think a responsible company would notice they were literally pissing $3 million away a lot sooner.

I'm certain they did.

They kept this pretty low in the news cycle by lying about the extent of damage.

I had vaguely heard about it here but I had no idea the extent of the actual issue because it is easy to shrug off when it's presented as 'nothing'.

But, it is something.


Standard practice.

The Tioga, ND spill wasn't reported for 11 days and they under reported by at least half the initial spill.
 
2021-01-22 5:51:35 PM  

Hoblit: cretinbob: So 1.2 million × $2.50
You would think a responsible company would notice they were literally pissing $3 million away a lot sooner.

I'm certain they did.

They kept this pretty low in the news cycle by lying about the extent of damage.

I had vaguely heard about it here but I had no idea the extent of the actual issue because it is easy to shrug off when it's presented as 'nothing'.

But, it is something.


Every company notices when a dime gets misspent.

They notice way more when government fines start getting tossed around. I'm sure if they were given a choice, they would rather lose 3 million dollars, hide the evidence, and call it a week.
 
2021-01-22 5:53:54 PM  
Tell me again why we want pipelines for this shiat around water tables and nature preserves?
 
2021-01-22 5:55:24 PM  
A for-profit company will lie to protect its profits.

You already know this.  Stop pretending to be surprised.
 
2021-01-22 5:55:30 PM  
"Colonial plays an important role in both supplying the US East Coast and allowing Gulf Coast refiners to place their production competitively. Most Gulf Coast refiners place at least some of their product on the Colonial pipeline, or sell to customers who do.
Due to the volume of refined product moved, the pipeline (especially at its Houston origin) is a major point for spot market trading of these products, providing the basis for the Gulf Coast Pipe price assessment."

From McKinsey Energy Insights.
 
2021-01-22 5:59:11 PM  
Regulations are killing industry.
 
2021-01-22 6:05:34 PM  
The important thing is the people at the top made a lot of money.
 
2021-01-22 6:06:57 PM  

cretinbob: So 1.2 million × $2.50
You would think a responsible company would notice they were literally pissing $3 million away a lot sooner.


Does it cost more to cover it up and keep polluting or clean it up and ensure it never happens again? Without a regulator that can sue them into near non-existence when they pull this shiat, it will be wash-rinse-repeat until the end of days.
 
2021-01-22 6:08:37 PM  
Y'all git yer empty shine jugs, and siphon hoses!  Let's go get us some free gas just like god intended us to.

Harvest what you use and use what you harvest.
 
2021-01-22 6:10:03 PM  
Take them to court and revoke their incorporation.  There's no right to incorporation.  Incorporation exists on the principle that it's in society's overall best interests.  When a corporation is not in society's best interests, it has no reason -- and no right -- to exist.

Dissolve it, void all of its licenses and such, and, after applying appropriate fines, force distribution of its assets to shareholders (if any).

The End.

Even if you're not going to regulate corporations responsibly . . . a corporation is like a fire.  Incredibly useful under control; incredibly stupid to leave unattended to behave without restraint.
 
2021-01-22 6:14:09 PM  

W_Scarlet: Tell me again why we want pipelines for this shiat around water tables and nature preserves?


Money.
 
2021-01-22 6:15:57 PM  
If it were water, that would be a cube 54.5 feet on a side.  Since it is oil, it might actually be a little bigger.
 
2021-01-22 6:18:44 PM  

skyotter: A for-profit company will lie to protect its profits.

You already know this.  Stop pretending to be surprised.


And non-profits will happily lay off their people to tell the truth?

Nobody wants to tell the cops the truth.  The difference is that corporations can get away with lying to them.
 
2021-01-22 6:51:28 PM  
It concerns me that we've reached the point in the timeline where reporting on a 300,000 gallon pipeline spill is considered "tiny" enough to fly under the radar.....
 
2021-01-22 7:18:13 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-01-22 7:22:45 PM  
Oopsies!
 
2021-01-22 7:38:28 PM  

nealb2: Gas has a very high vapor pressure so it will stay around long. Just a historical perspective... when oil was first refined in the US, gas was considered a waste product that was dumped in the rivers.


I'm curious, it's been a long time since I studied any of that stuff. Wouldn't high vapor pressure mean it evaporates faster?
 
2021-01-22 7:55:06 PM  
Worked at some company a few years back where we saw internal documents from several train companies and guess what, there were hundreds of trains derailing where they leak all kind of chemicals in nature for the last few decades and you never hear this kind of stuff on the news. Companies never pay for this stuff or they do some surface clean up to look good when theres witnesses and thats about it.

Its a farking joke.
 
2021-01-22 8:54:27 PM  

snapperhead: cretinbob: So 1.2 million × $2.50
You would think a responsible company would notice they were literally pissing $3 million away a lot sooner.

Does it cost more to cover it up and keep polluting or clean it up and ensure it never happens again? Without a regulator that can sue them into near non-existence when they pull this shiat, it will be wash-rinse-repeat until the end of days.


Actually, the very cheapest way, for the company that is, is to patch it, continue flowing and not clean it up.

And I have sat in on many a morning meeting were different areas report their production from overnight.....they know when they are down 10 barrels in a 12 hour period.

They know down to 100 barrels if not better exactly how much was spilled.
 
2021-01-22 9:07:57 PM  
Just business as usual in the US. Hopefully they get a stern letter and a pittance of a fine to pay from our wonderful government officials.
 
2021-01-22 9:48:45 PM  
Well that's probably a big kick in the Keystone for the Canadians wanting to ship the oil through the USA to China.
 
2021-01-22 10:19:41 PM  

skyotter: A for-profit company will lie to protect its profits.

You already know this.  Stop pretending to be surprised.


We need to change the motivation. Companies running pipelines should need to keep clean up costs  ($50,000,000 or so) in escrow. After a leak, they have 5 years to replace the money or the pipeline gets shut down.
 
2021-01-22 11:14:43 PM  

lolmao500: Worked at some company a few years back where we saw internal documents from several train companies and guess what, there were hundreds of trains derailing where they leak all kind of chemicals in nature for the last few decades and you never hear this kind of stuff on the news. Companies never pay for this stuff or they do some surface clean up to look good when theres witnesses and thats about it.
Its a farking joke.


The more I look at the world, the more I am convinced that it's just a comedy of people lying about small things, big things, saving face, ignoring the unpleasant stuff, and not rocking the boat.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-01-23 1:17:50 AM  

AppleOptionEsc: Hoblit: cretinbob: So 1.2 million × $2.50
You would think a responsible company would notice they were literally pissing $3 million away a lot sooner.

I'm certain they did.

They kept this pretty low in the news cycle by lying about the extent of damage.

I had vaguely heard about it here but I had no idea the extent of the actual issue because it is easy to shrug off when it's presented as 'nothing'.

But, it is something.

Every company notices when a dime gets misspent.

They notice way more when government fines start getting tossed around. I'm sure if they were given a choice, they would rather lose 3 million dollars, hide the evidence, and call it a week.


Nothing a bill removing state authority to impose fines for pipeline leaks won't fix. Their state legislature is eager to find new ways to hamper their Democratic governor.
 
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