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(Oddity Central)   Threads of God, arguably one of the world's rarest pasta is so because there's only three women who can make it on Italy's Sardinia island   (odditycentral.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Pasta, Sardinia, Slow Food, world's rarest pasta, Spaghetti, threads of God, Paola Abraini, Dough  
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967 clicks; posted to Food » on 22 Jan 2021 at 8:35 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-01-22 6:21:17 AM  
I bet some Asian chefs can do it.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-01-22 6:52:57 AM  
The stuff probably tastes no better or worse than any other pasta, bit it's rare. They just need a marketing agency and they can hire hundreds of cooks to make that shiat.
 
2021-01-22 7:43:19 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size

Here is a picture of the pasta harvest.
 
2021-01-22 8:05:35 AM  
Sooooo....if i learn this skill, that would grant me italian citizenship, right?
 
2021-01-22 8:42:41 AM  
It only consists of three ingredients - semolina flower, water and salt - but because everything is made by hand, it's the process itself that's grueling. After mixing the ingredients, the dough is kneaded for a very long time to stretch the gluten, the key to making the extremely long and thin strands. Once it's flexible enough, the stretching begins.

Yes, there's absolutely no way, none whatsoever, to automate the process of kneading flour, water, and salt. Can't be done.

Also, I'm imagining some sort of web video in which someone participates in the long trek to this village to sample this pasta but after sitting down asks for the gluten-free version.
 
2021-01-22 8:44:47 AM  

Moosedick Gladys Greengroin: I bet some Asian chefs can do it.

[Fark user image image 847x439]


My thoughts exactly.
 
2021-01-22 9:16:01 AM  

raerae1980: Sooooo....if i learn this skill, that would grant me italian citizenship, right?


Sardinia is gorgeous, I would be jealous
 
2021-01-22 9:19:00 AM  
I bet that would taste awesome with some Ragu.

target.scene7.comView Full Size
 
2021-01-22 9:22:29 AM  
This bears repeating
 
2021-01-22 9:25:07 AM  

SirEattonHogg: I bet that would taste awesome with some Ragu.

[target.scene7.com image 325x325]


Like I need pasta with my Ragu.
 
2021-01-22 9:25:18 AM  

johnny_vegas: raerae1980: Sooooo....if i learn this skill, that would grant me italian citizenship, right?

Sardinia is gorgeous, I would be jealous


Ive never been to Sardenia, or Sicily.   Frustrates me to no end.
 
2021-01-22 9:26:33 AM  
Getting that kind of extensibility with a purely semolina dough is insane. I'm with PocketNinja, though; the kneading seems like it could be done by machine. It might even be better by machine, developing more gluten more quickly. The stretching, however, must take forever to get the hang of it.
 
2021-01-22 9:26:41 AM  
 I'll stick with Threads from Todd, thanks.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-01-22 9:31:36 AM  
Only way to save it:  charge more and pay the Italian LOLs who make it insane amounts of money.
 
2021-01-22 9:33:02 AM  

raerae1980: Sooooo....if i learn this skill, that would grant me italian citizenship, right?


Sardinian citizenship.

Also good luck spending several decades of your life on that.
 
2021-01-22 9:45:16 AM  

phlegmjay: Getting that kind of extensibility with a purely semolina dough is insane. I'm with PocketNinja, though; the kneading seems like it could be done by machine. It might even be better by machine, developing more gluten more quickly. The stretching, however, must take forever to get the hang of it.


I was lucky. Growing up until I was 16 I spent 6 weeks every other summer in Corsica which always included a visit to Sardinia
 
2021-01-22 9:46:34 AM  

casual disregard: raerae1980: Sooooo....if i learn this skill, that would grant me italian citizenship, right?

Sardinian citizenship.

Also good luck spending several decades of your life on that.


Sardenia is a part of Italy, which im already working towards gaining citizenship if i qualify.   Still waiting, though.
 
2021-01-22 9:46:58 AM  

casual disregard: raerae1980: Sooooo....if i learn this skill, that would grant me italian citizenship, right?

Sardinian citizenship.

Also good luck spending several decades of your life on that.


Who the hell wants to be a Sardine?
 
2021-01-22 9:47:31 AM  

raerae1980: casual disregard: raerae1980: Sooooo....if i learn this skill, that would grant me italian citizenship, right?

Sardinian citizenship.

Also good luck spending several decades of your life on that.

Sardenia is a part of Italy, which im already working towards gaining citizenship if i qualify.   Still waiting, though.


Then good luck on both counts.
 
2021-01-22 9:54:05 AM  

casual disregard: raerae1980: casual disregard: raerae1980: Sooooo....if i learn this skill, that would grant me italian citizenship, right?

Sardinian citizenship.

Also good luck spending several decades of your life on that.

Sardenia is a part of Italy, which im already working towards gaining citizenship if i qualify.   Still waiting, though.

Then good luck on both counts.


Thanks!  My fingers are crossed as well. 😊
 
2021-01-22 10:02:29 AM  
So she goes through all that trouble to make very long thin strands of pasta...and then dries them all stuck together so they are no longer individual strands and then breaks them up to cook them so they are no longer long. I do admire how difficult that pasta must be to make, but I don't understand why anyone would bother. Which I guess is why hardly anyone does.
 
2021-01-22 10:06:11 AM  
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2021-01-22 10:54:56 AM  
 
2021-01-22 10:58:16 AM  
Nice threads, God.

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2021-01-22 11:05:40 AM  

CrazyGerbilLady: So she goes through all that trouble to make very long thin strands of pasta...and then dries them all stuck together so they are no longer individual strands and then breaks them up to cook them so they are no longer long. I do admire how difficult that pasta must be to make, but I don't understand why anyone would bother. Which I guess is why hardly anyone does.


In videos, it looks like the strands start to separate again upon cooking, but they are broken up short.
 
2021-01-22 11:37:45 AM  

Gentlequiet: [Fark user image 425x298]


Captainamericai get that reference.jpeg
 
2021-01-22 11:46:48 AM  
You know, there's this thing called "writing", that lets you pass information down from one generation to the next, without having to actually meet them. And there's this new thing called "video", that lets you actually show how to do something.
 
2021-01-22 11:52:30 AM  

raerae1980: Ive never been to Sardenia


Incredible bronze age culture there (Nuragic people).

You must go dig.
 
2021-01-22 11:58:10 AM  

Tyrone Slothrop: You know, there's this thing called "writing", that lets you pass information down from one generation to the next, without having to actually meet them.


It's not the knowledge, it's the technique. It takes a long time to master how to do it and no one wants to put in the thousand or so hours of practice to do it properly.

You can read a book on how to be an Olympic figure skater, you still won't know how to skate. It's why the engineering trades have apprenticeship programs -- for the practice. Knowing how to do it is the easy part. Actually doing it at an elite level takes time.
 
2021-01-22 12:14:49 PM  
Semolina flower?
 
2021-01-22 12:39:02 PM  

Madison_Smiled: Semolina flower?


That's why it's the world's rarest pasta.
 
2021-01-22 12:43:53 PM  
When my grandmother, who was old world Italian, died, she took all her knowledge with her.

Obviously her recipes weren't rare like this or anything but she was a hell of a cook, made everything from scratch and never wrote anything down. Every Christmas she would make a truckload of Italian cookies and pastries and hand them out to everyone.

Her kids (my mother and aunt) were too busy being hippies to bother to learn from her and I was too young and to really appreciate it then. I've tried over the years to replicate some of the things she made. It's usually good but it's never the same.

I wish she had written things down. It's really a shame when that kind of knowledge just disappears.
 
2021-01-22 12:57:23 PM  

Jesus McSordid: The stuff probably tastes no better or worse than any other pasta, bit it's rare. They just need a marketing agency and they can hire hundreds of cooks to make that shiat.


I can taste the difference between pastas, because they taste different. That's not a subject I think you'd want to bet about tbh., though maybe you should treat yourself to some quality pasta, since you're missing out.

There's more to it than shape.

Oh, I guess you didn't read TFA, as is custom.

Noone is saying that people couldn't make it, given time and practice. So the hope for her is that someone will, otherwise the technique, and thus this pasta, dies.

There has to be a lot of feel to it, since Barilla couldn't figure out how to mechanise it when they tried.

I guess sometimes, just because someone could be taught, it does not mean that someone will be arsed to learn. Consider how and why languages die out for example, just because something can be taught, doesn't mean someone will.

Rarely does abilities or knowledge disappear because they're secret.
 
2021-01-22 12:59:19 PM  

Jesus McSordid: The stuff probably tastes no better or worse than any other pasta, bit it's rare. They just need a marketing agency and they can hire hundreds of cooks to make that shiat.


Ah sorry, you didn't offer to bet about taste. Got your post confused with someone else.

I haven't tasted it myself, don't really care either. Though, I'd likely be able to taste the difference.
 
2021-01-22 1:56:11 PM  

Ketchuponsteak: I can taste the difference between pastas, because they taste different. That's not a subject I think you'd want to bet about tbh., though maybe you should treat yourself to some quality pasta, since you're missing out.


By and large, most extruded dry pasta will taste the same since they're made from the same basic ingredients.  There will of course be some variance depending on where/when those ingredients were sourced but considering the pasta takes on the flavor from the sauce I doubt the vast majority of people could discern any differences.  Pasta doughs using egg and/or other ingredients are a different story.


Tyrone Slothrop: You know, there's this thing called "writing", that lets you pass information down from one generation to the next, without having to actually meet them. And there's this new thing called "video", that lets you actually show how to do something.


Yeah, my takeaway from the article is that it's mostly an issue of people not thinking it's worth the effort to take the time to get the technique down.  Seems like it should easily be able to live on with some detailed video documentation and one's willingness to put in more than a couple of hours of trying.
 
2021-01-22 2:05:32 PM  

Tyrone Slothrop: You know, there's this thing called "writing", that lets you pass information down from one generation to the next, without having to actually meet them. And there's this new thing called "video", that lets you actually show how to do something.


This. Get a deal with some food channel. They send a few apprentices. Then they video document their entire learning process. They may not learn all the subtleties. But at least the technique can always be 99% recreated from the videos.
 
2021-01-22 2:06:44 PM  

Joey Jo Jo Jr Shabadu: By and large, most extruded dry pasta will taste the same since they're made from the same basic ingredients.  There will of course be some variance depending on where/when those ingredients were sourced but considering the pasta takes on the flavor from the sauce I doubt the vast majority of people could discern any differences.  Pasta doughs using egg and/or other ingredients are a different story.


The rough-feeling dried pastas at the grocery store taste very different from the smooth-feeling ones, in general. The rough-feeling ones are also all more expensive. I do not know why they're different, nor what about the rough ones makes them more expensive, but the difference ain't subtle.
 
2021-01-22 2:16:10 PM  

fallingcow: Joey Jo Jo Jr Shabadu: By and large, most extruded dry pasta will taste the same since they're made from the same basic ingredients.  There will of course be some variance depending on where/when those ingredients were sourced but considering the pasta takes on the flavor from the sauce I doubt the vast majority of people could discern any differences.  Pasta doughs using egg and/or other ingredients are a different story.

The rough-feeling dried pastas at the grocery store taste very different from the smooth-feeling ones, in general. The rough-feeling ones are also all more expensive. I do not know why they're different, nor what about the rough ones makes them more expensive, but the difference ain't subtle.


When you say taste, are you including other variables other than flavor alone?  Like texture, chew, etc.?  The rougher texture is usually a result of the shapes being extruded through a bronze die, and that helps with the sauce or other ingredient flavors adhering to the pasta better.
 
2021-01-22 2:17:42 PM  

Joey Jo Jo Jr Shabadu: Ketchuponsteak: I can taste the difference between pastas, because they taste different. That's not a subject I think you'd want to bet about tbh., though maybe you should treat yourself to some quality pasta, since you're missing out.

By and large, most extruded dry pasta will taste the same since they're made from the same basic ingredients.  There will of course be some variance depending on where/when those ingredients were sourced but considering the pasta takes on the flavor from the sauce I doubt the vast majority of people could discern any differences.  Pasta doughs using egg and/or other ingredients are a different story.

Pasta tastes different based on the ingredients, shape and preparation.


The shape of pasta is often determined on what dish it is meant for.

But the preparation, and ingredients, also leads to a huge variation of taste.

And no, of course you can't teach the technique per video. You cannot convey taste or feel via that medium.
 
2021-01-22 2:42:59 PM  

Ketchuponsteak: But the preparation, and ingredients, also leads to a huge variation of taste.


My point was that most dry pasta is made from the exact same ingredients.  Flavor alone should be pretty consistent across the board.  Now if you're including things like thickness, texture, etc. as part of "taste" then yeah, you're going to sense differences.

Ketchuponsteak: And no, of course you can't teach the technique per video. You cannot convey taste or feel via that medium.


I disagree.  Of course any video or written instruction/description won't match the experience of learning it first hand with the experts, but you could certainly learn the technique through those other means if it's documented with attention to detail.  The vast library of cookbooks and existing video sources already prove that.
 
2021-01-22 3:15:52 PM  

Joey Jo Jo Jr Shabadu: Ketchuponsteak: But the preparation, and ingredients, also leads to a huge variation of taste.

My point was that most dry pasta is made from the exact same ingredients.  Flavor alone should be pretty consistent across the board.  Now if you're including things like thickness, texture, etc. as part of "taste" then yeah, you're going to sense differences.

Ketchuponsteak: And no, of course you can't teach the technique per video. You cannot convey taste or feel via that medium.

I disagree.  Of course any video or written instruction/description won't match the experience of learning it first hand with the experts, but you could certainly learn the technique through those other means if it's documented with attention to detail.  The vast library of cookbooks and existing video sources already prove that.


No, the preparation can make identical ingredients taste different.

No, a video can not convey feel or taste.

I accept that you can not understand this. However you're coming from a position, where theres, one of many, articles and videos talking about this, and yet you claim to know better.

Thats hardly a convincing position to get across your belief that you know better than, what you probably consider, "so called experts".
 
2021-01-22 3:34:16 PM  

Ketchuponsteak: No, the preparation can make identical ingredients taste different.

No, a video can not convey feel or taste.


Again, how are defining taste?  That's my point. This is just semolina and water pushed through an extender and dried. Flavor alone won't vary much. But if you're  encompassing other variables under the term "taste" then of course it will.


As for the video, have you never read a book, watched a movie, listened to a podcast, etc. where someone was able to accurately describe something?  Of course it cannot match experiencing it first hand, but are you trying to say that cookbooks, video learning, and all other second hand learning resources are just one giant farking scam?
 
2021-01-22 3:41:37 PM  

Joey Jo Jo Jr Shabadu: fallingcow: Joey Jo Jo Jr Shabadu: By and large, most extruded dry pasta will taste the same since they're made from the same basic ingredients.  There will of course be some variance depending on where/when those ingredients were sourced but considering the pasta takes on the flavor from the sauce I doubt the vast majority of people could discern any differences.  Pasta doughs using egg and/or other ingredients are a different story.

The rough-feeling dried pastas at the grocery store taste very different from the smooth-feeling ones, in general. The rough-feeling ones are also all more expensive. I do not know why they're different, nor what about the rough ones makes them more expensive, but the difference ain't subtle.

When you say taste, are you including other variables other than flavor alone?  Like texture, chew, etc.?  The rougher texture is usually a result of the shapes being extruded through a bronze die, and that helps with the sauce or other ingredient flavors adhering to the pasta better.


They seem a lot starchier, for one thing. Pasta water with the dirt-cheap smooth pasta is usually clear, the rough ones it's much milkier. Not a small difference, either. IDK why it's different, nor why it's correlated with smoothness/roughness. Just seems to be. Flavor comes through in unsauced pasta, too (as when one taste-tests a piece while cooking). The cheap stuff tastes like salt water and that's about it (if you under-salt they basically have no flavor). The rougher varieties tastes like durum + salt water. The pasta has actual flavor.

Maybe there are smooth ones that act like the rough ones and that has nothing to do with it, I just know that seems to be the dividing line between them in normal grocery aisles around here. I just wait for the "good" pasta to go on steep sale or clearance, then buy a ton of it.
 
2021-01-22 3:48:12 PM  
I'd never checked up on this, but a quick google reveals the difference may be fast, high-temp drying (~260f) for the glossy-smooth pasta versus much longer, low-temp drying (~100f) producing the very rough-looking pasta. I've worked enough with doughs of various kinds that I'd be surprised if that difference didn't affect the flavor and texture, both.
 
2021-01-22 3:58:23 PM  

fallingcow: I'd never checked up on this, but a quick google reveals the difference may be fast, high-temp drying (~260f) for the glossy-smooth pasta versus much longer, low-temp drying (~100f) producing the very rough-looking pasta. I've worked enough with doughs of various kinds that I'd be surprised if that difference didn't affect the flavor and texture, both.


Yeah, forgot to consider the drying process in it all as well. That definitely contributes. That, along with the bronze die on the extruder are the main reasons.


For anyone wanting a really good resource on all sorts of pasta making, I highly recommend this book: (It dives pretty deep into the science of it as well. The accompanying Mastering Bread/Pizza books are solid as well)

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-01-22 4:28:45 PM  
Barilla can't automate the process because their machinery isn't geared for lots of mechanical preparation. No pasta machine does it the old way, for reasons that should be obvious. They'd probably have to set up an entire factory solely dedicated to these nood's just because of all the steps involved in prep.

Good news is that robotics is becoming more ubiquitous, so once the technique is recorded it's trivial to replicate. See also robotic blacksmithing.
 
2021-01-22 4:55:09 PM  

Joey Jo Jo Jr Shabadu: Ketchuponsteak: No, the preparation can make identical ingredients taste different.

No, a video can not convey feel or taste.

Again, how are defining taste?  That's my point. This is just semolina and water pushed through an extender and dried. Flavor alone won't vary much. But if you're  encompassing other variables under the term "taste" then of course it will.


As for the video, have you never read a book, watched a movie, listened to a podcast, etc. where someone was able to accurately describe something?  Of course it cannot match experiencing it first hand, but are you trying to say that cookbooks, video learning, and all other second hand learning resources are just one giant farking scam?


I am not trying to tell you anything, I am coveying information.

Being stubborn and longwinding isnt making a point, it's just obtuse.
 
2021-01-22 5:08:45 PM  

Ketchuponsteak: Joey Jo Jo Jr Shabadu: Ketchuponsteak: No, the preparation can make identical ingredients taste different.

No, a video can not convey feel or taste.

Again, how are defining taste?  That's my point. This is just semolina and water pushed through an extender and dried. Flavor alone won't vary much. But if you're  encompassing other variables under the term "taste" then of course it will.


As for the video, have you never read a book, watched a movie, listened to a podcast, etc. where someone was able to accurately describe something?  Of course it cannot match experiencing it first hand, but are you trying to say that cookbooks, video learning, and all other second hand learning resources are just one giant farking scam?

I am not trying to tell you anything, I am coveying information.

Being stubborn and longwinding isnt making a point, it's just obtuse.


Who's the one being obtuse?  You ignored the question.

What information are you conveying?  That this is literally a specific skill that only 3 little old ladies in Sardinia can attempt to teach, but only in person?
 
2021-01-22 5:40:26 PM  

Stibium: Barilla can't automate the process because their machinery isn't geared for lots of mechanical preparation. No pasta machine does it the old way, for reasons that should be obvious. They'd probably have to set up an entire factory solely dedicated to these nood's just because of all the steps involved in prep.

Good news is that robotics is becoming more ubiquitous, so once the technique is recorded it's trivial to replicate. See also robotic blacksmithing.


Also, another reason that it can't be automated is because extrusion completely changes the gluten structure and will undergo more mixing inside the extruder, especially for smaller noodles which require higher extrusion pressure. Optimizing "grain" length for the diameter in an extrusion press and then feeding the strands into finer and finer roller dies might work, kinda like how wire-drawing dies work but without the friction. This would be an exceptionally delicate process because the gluten isn't going to be optimal for the final noodle diameter, which is the most probable reason Barilla couldn't do it, in my estimation. It still wouldn't taste anything like the real stuff though, also likely to be one of the biggest barriers.
 
2021-01-22 7:38:49 PM  

Ketchuponsteak: Jesus McSordid: The stuff probably tastes no better or worse than any other pasta, bit it's rare. They just need a marketing agency and they can hire hundreds of cooks to make that shiat.

I can taste the difference between pastas, because they taste different. That's not a subject I think you'd want to bet about tbh., though maybe you should treat yourself to some quality pasta, since you're missing out.

There's more to it than shape.

Oh, I guess you didn't read TFA, as is custom.

Noone is saying that people couldn't make it, given time and practice. So the hope for her is that someone will, otherwise the technique, and thus this pasta, dies.

There has to be a lot of feel to it, since Barilla couldn't figure out how to mechanise it when they tried.

I guess sometimes, just because someone could be taught, it does not mean that someone will be arsed to learn. Consider how and why languages die out for example, just because something can be taught, doesn't mean someone will.

Rarely does abilities or knowledge disappear because they're secret.


I skimmed it. Enough to get the idea. I wasn't saying anything about the flavour, just that, if it's a hard-to-find food item, there will be people who will pay a premium to eat it in a restaurant. And if you have a market and a premium price, you will find people sufficiently motivated to learn how to make it and spend their lives doing it. An economic motive shouldn't be frowned upon, if it encourages artisanship.
 
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