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(The Atlantic)   We can't reach COVID herd immunity without vaccinating kids. Also, we haven't finished testing COVID vaccines on kids yet   (theatlantic.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Vaccination, Vaccine, Immune system, vaccine trials, Cincinnati Children's Hospital, vaccine-development effort, part of the Pfizer COVID-19, ultimate goal of most vaccination campaigns  
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260 clicks; posted to STEM » and Main » on 21 Jan 2021 at 5:50 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-01-21 5:44:02 PM  
Third stage trials for US COVID-19 vaccines only began last year in adults. As the article explains, testing just started on kids 12 and up.

FTA: With COVID-19 vaccines proven to be safe and effective in most adults, Pfizer and Moderna have both begun U.S. trials for kids as young as 12. And if those trials go smoothly, the vaccines will be tested in younger and younger kids. This is typical for new vaccines: "It's called the age deescalation strategy," Carol Kao, a pediatrician at Washington University in St. Louis, told me.
 
2021-01-21 5:58:32 PM  
Yeah, how about we worry about herd immunity potential AFTER we're past the logistical barriers of getting everyone who wants it vaccinated.

/Hell, anti-vaccers already broke herd immunity on things like measles.  How would we expect it on this without mandatory measures?
 
2021-01-21 6:54:47 PM  
I thought we were past this herd immunity bullshiat.
 
2021-01-21 6:57:10 PM  
By the time we get to vaccinate kids, every kid alive now will be 12 or older.
 
2021-01-21 7:02:24 PM  

Mugato: I thought we were past this herd immunity bullshiat.


lol
That's funny. I've yet to see anything suggesting this isn't the policy we are going after. It's insane.

I was reading an article recently that had a bunch of "on this date" things in it. Interesting stuff. In 1919, during the Spanish Flu, Phoenix Arizona had a law that required wearing masks. If you didn't, you either were given $100 fine or 30 days in jail.
 
2021-01-21 9:05:22 PM  
Ugh.  My kid is in more than one high risk category.  In my state, he's eligible for the vaccine right now - EXCEPT he's too young.  I get that this is how vaccines are rolled out and it's for safety reasons.  I'm not arguing that things should have been done differently or that rules based on science ought to be broken for my particular snowflake.  But man, I don't like that it has to be this way, either.
 
2021-01-21 10:23:14 PM  

Mugato: I thought we were past this herd immunity bullshiat.


This.
 
2021-01-21 11:10:11 PM  

Mugato: I thought we were past this herd immunity bullshiat.


We're past the "natural" herd immunity BS, i.e., the kind where everyone gets sick. We're striving for the vaccination herd immunity. Like we got with smallpox, polio, and should have with measles.
 
2021-01-22 1:39:38 AM  

Mugato: I thought we were past this herd immunity bullshiat.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-01-22 1:51:00 AM  

PhoenixFarker: Mugato: I thought we were past this herd immunity bullshiat.

We're past the "natural" herd immunity BS, i.e., the kind where everyone gets sick. We're striving for the vaccination herd immunity. Like we got with smallpox, polio, and should have with measles.


We also need to still be striving for the "everybody wears masks and gets their temperatures taken a lot" herd immunity - it's cheap, rapidly deployable, and can cut down the spread rates.  My part of California's finally down below R=1 (but it's still 0.95, so that's still a moderately fast spread.)
 
2021-01-22 8:25:17 AM  
Kids: the biggest infection vector nobody wants to address.
 
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