Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(YouTube)   What if subdivisions are just a ponzi scheme you live in   (youtube.com) divider line
    More: Awkward  
•       •       •

1164 clicks; posted to Business » on 18 Jan 2021 at 6:50 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



76 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2021-01-18 2:59:57 PM  
In the backseat of cars?
 
2021-01-18 3:10:12 PM  

spongeboob: In the backseat of cars?


Be cool or be cast out
 
2021-01-18 3:26:04 PM  
What if the economy was something that we just made up, like Jesus or the ability to have long-term happiness, and the whole thing is a construct that *mostly* prevents the psychotic semi-hairless apes who inhabit this planet from murdering each other over shiny, valueless rocks?
 
2021-01-18 3:37:30 PM  
How come fingers never 'fing'?
 
2021-01-18 5:02:28 PM  

iheartscotch: What if the economy was something that we just made up, like Jesus or the ability to have long-term happiness, and the whole thing is a construct that *mostly* prevents the psychotic semi-hairless apes who inhabit this planet from murdering each other over shiny, valueless rocks?


I can't imagine.
 
2021-01-18 5:04:59 PM  

BumpInTheNight: How come fingers never 'fing'?


Oh wait....there they go...
 
2021-01-18 5:28:51 PM  
Rush - Subdivisions (Official Music Video)
Youtube EYYdQB0mkEU
 
2021-01-18 6:16:12 PM  
That was good as were the earlier ones. I looked at some more but it was becoming whining about "cyclist" stuff.
 
2021-01-18 6:24:17 PM  
Weeds Theme Song
Youtube u4KfJztaJ5I
 
2021-01-18 6:53:54 PM  
Less ponzi, more check-kiting...
 
2021-01-18 6:53:57 PM  
Following Fark tradition, I'm going to not view the link and still comment on why it is wrong:

You have to live somewhere. For most people you either pay rent or pay a mortgage. Out of the two it has been historically advantageous to have the mortgage over the rent in most situations.

A subdivision is just somewhere to build a house and has no inharent negatives to it. A different argument could be made for an HOA, especially one that does more than attempt to safeguard property value.
 
2021-01-18 6:56:34 PM  
Conform or be cast out
 
2021-01-18 7:19:11 PM  
Subdivisions have existed long before Levitt.  We called them streetcar suburbs.  Plenty of subdivisions retain value and plenty don't.  It's not a problem inherent to suburbs.
 
2021-01-18 7:22:06 PM  
Watched the video. It's about aging infrastructure.  Misleading headline.
 
2021-01-18 7:54:59 PM  

Rapmaster2000: Subdivisions have existed long before Levitt.  We called them streetcar suburbs.  Plenty of subdivisions retain value and plenty don't.  It's not a problem inherent to suburbs.


Subdivisions have existed for a long time, but in the last few decades they've been turned up to 11.  Visit places like Santa Clarita, CA, or Simi Valley.  Giant sprawling mazes of houses, all beige stucco with red tile roofs.  I've seen ones where you can't possibly reach even a grocery store without getting in your car.  The neighborhoods are anti pedestrian, and there's not enough of a tax base to maintain the streets, sewage systems, etc.,
 
2021-01-18 7:55:37 PM  

Rapmaster2000: Watched the video. It's about aging infrastructure.  Misleading headline.


that's what you get for reading the article. we don't get fooled again!
 
2021-01-18 8:03:46 PM  
I was told to be cool or be cast out.
 
2021-01-18 8:18:45 PM  
My condo has gone up far more in market value than I've paid off the principal. I did nothing and somehow my property is worth more than when I bought it. It's like I found a wallet with a bunch of $1,000 bills.

(Yea, inflation eats into some of that increase, but not all of it.)
 
2021-01-18 8:20:55 PM  

hlehmann: I've seen ones where you can't possibly reach even a grocery store without getting in your car.


So... most of Cali then?

/lived here all my life - when it was in such a place I was never in sane walking distance of a store.
 
2021-01-18 9:03:02 PM  

Some Junkie Cosmonaut: hlehmann: I've seen ones where you can't possibly reach even a grocery store without getting in your car.

So... most of Cali then?

/lived here all my life - when it was in such a place I was never in sane walking distance of a store.


I live in one of the subdivisions that was built in the post war years.  I can, and do, walk to a couple of different grocery stores, the drug store, my bank, a 7-11, a barber (in the before times), and decent Mexican and Thai takeout places. Some communities here are set up for it, some most certainly are not.
 
2021-01-18 9:12:10 PM  

AliceBToklasLives: My condo has gone up far more in market value than I've paid off the principal. I did nothing and somehow my property is worth more than when I bought it. It's like I found a wallet with a bunch of $1,000 bills.

(Yea, inflation eats into some of that increase, but not all of it.)


You bought something people would want before they wanted it.

It isn't a mystery.
 
2021-01-18 9:28:23 PM  

hlehmann: Rapmaster2000: Subdivisions have existed long before Levitt.  We called them streetcar suburbs.  Plenty of subdivisions retain value and plenty don't.  It's not a problem inherent to suburbs.

Subdivisions have existed for a long time, but in the last few decades they've been turned up to 11.  Visit places like Santa Clarita, CA, or Simi Valley.  Giant sprawling mazes of houses, all beige stucco with red tile roofs.  I've seen ones where you can't possibly reach even a grocery store without getting in your car.  The neighborhoods are anti pedestrian, and there's not enough of a tax base to maintain the streets, sewage systems, etc.,


Santa Clarita and Simi Valley have way better infrastructure (streets, sewage and water) then Los Angeles City and I lived in various parts of LA City and County.  Also, there is a ton of Aerospace companies in Simi Valley and a ton of business in the Santa Clarita valley now.  It's almost like you have actually never been to the two suburbs your talking about.  In fact, in the San Fernando Valley's tax base left the City of Los Angeles that city budget would be unsustainable.  Los Angeles City is an unsustainable mess.
 
2021-01-18 9:30:10 PM  

hlehmann: I've seen ones where you can't possibly reach even a grocery store without getting in your car.  The neighborhoods are anti pedestrian,


Shoot, that hardly requires megasprawl.  I can find you any number of Southern (and outside the South, but worst there) towns of 5-15 thousand, that haven't been growing, that are like 6-8 square miles, where both Walmart and the Piggly Wiggly are absolutely unreachable by foot/bike by any measure of safety (no-shoulder no-sidewalk, have to use a busy four-plus lane road).  Places where you can live 500 feet from a Walmart as-the-crow-flies, and you absolutely, positively have to drive to get there.
 
2021-01-18 9:43:51 PM  

TheSubjunctive: hlehmann: I've seen ones where you can't possibly reach even a grocery store without getting in your car.  The neighborhoods are anti pedestrian,

Shoot, that hardly requires megasprawl.  I can find you any number of Southern (and outside the South, but worst there) towns of 5-15 thousand, that haven't been growing, that are like 6-8 square miles, where both Walmart and the Piggly Wiggly are absolutely unreachable by foot/bike by any measure of safety (no-shoulder no-sidewalk, have to use a busy four-plus lane road).  Places where you can live 500 feet from a Walmart as-the-crow-flies, and you absolutely, positively have to drive to get there.


Walmart delivers now.  No need to walk or drive there.
 
2021-01-18 9:57:03 PM  

Rapmaster2000: Watched the video. It's about aging infrastructure.  Misleading headline.


In true Fark fashion, the first person to say hey read the article misinterprets it.

This thread is like, the perfect Fark thread.
 
2021-01-18 9:59:54 PM  
tax the poor more
 
2021-01-18 10:06:09 PM  

TheSubjunctive: hlehmann: I've seen ones where you can't possibly reach even a grocery store without getting in your car.  The neighborhoods are anti pedestrian,

Shoot, that hardly requires megasprawl.  I can find you any number of Southern (and outside the South, but worst there) towns of 5-15 thousand, that haven't been growing, that are like 6-8 square miles, where both Walmart and the Piggly Wiggly are absolutely unreachable by foot/bike by any measure of safety (no-shoulder no-sidewalk, have to use a busy four-plus lane road).  Places where you can live 500 feet from a Walmart as-the-crow-flies, and you absolutely, positively have to drive to get there.


I could easily walk to the grocery store. It's the walk back that would be problematic. Just the toilet paper and paper towels would take up a bunch of my wingspan. I'd guess our average grocery trip weighs about 50 lbs. So, I think I'll keep taking the car for that.
 
2021-01-18 10:14:17 PM  
Yep, municipalities need the tax revenue from new developments to pay for maintaining the existing developments. And, if the music stops, it all comes crashing down rather dramatically. This is why the 'old suburbs' in many mid-tier cities turn to shiat so quickly. Between the lack of infrastructure spending and the constant movement to newer, bigger, and better leaving only the lower income brackets behind, your typical suburb only has about 25-30 years of expected life to it. Urban renewal writ large; the exurbs of the 1990s and early 2000s are the inner cities of the 70s and 80s. Crazy that you would buy a house with a mortgage that you will pay off right around the time the whole neighbourhood looks like it's going to collapse...

Protip: buy old, not new. Find a place where there's a proven history of sustained inhabitation.
 
2021-01-18 10:14:47 PM  
A Ponzi scheme lies about what it is providing. A subdivision is very honest - differentiating itself from any surrounding undesirables (poors, minorities, etc) to continue to leech off the greater economic driver of the urban area while pretending to be as far apart from it as imagination makes possible.
 
2021-01-18 10:18:56 PM  
I live in a small town that is all suburban, and has a balanced budget.

He asks the question of 'why do we still do this' and ascribes it to the availability of debt.

No, we do this because we like the lifestyle and the space and the chance to be homeowners.  No one in the alt-transit press wants to admit that suburbia is comfortable and convenient and that not everyone wants to live on top of each other like hamsters.

No one's come up with a method of transportation more convenient and more personalized and comfy than the car.  It has no last mile problem.

Few large US cities have done public transportation in a way that makes them attractive and desirable to live in.  The best example of high density living that actually works is Tokyo (and most of Japan).  You can take a train anywhere you want and get within two blocks of your destination usually.  They are fast, on time, frequent and spotless.  Compare and contrast to even New York (I'm looking at you, Pizza Rat and skeevy subway denizens) and there's not much comparison.   But it's still not for everyone. I like VISITING Tokyo, and experiencing the hustle bustle, but then I want to go home and enjoy living there.

I've seen so many US cities initiate public transportation programs that are woefully inadequate to the task and end up being a boondoggle.  San Jose's light rail system is a good example.   They built a light rail system that converged on a downtown transit mall that was supposed to be the next hot thing.   Trouble was the Light rail system left large swaths of suburbs unserved, and if you had to get in your car to get to the light rail station, you might as well just stay in it because you'll save two hours at the end of the day because light rail is so slow.  Only certain use cases work where people live along the line and happen to work along the line as well.   The transit mall ended up being mostly empty of people and businesses.   Why bother when there are so many better and more convenient options in the burbs.

I'm not saying the maintenance issue isn't a problem, but the cities I am familiar with have a good handle on it and are in the black. The ones that typically go bankrupt are cities that are tied to a single industry that tanks, leaving everyone holding the bag.   These cities are typically not near other urban centers that can use them as a bedroom community.   So they stand and fall on their own and are vunerable.
 
2021-01-18 10:28:06 PM  

harlock: I live in a small town that is all suburban, and has a balanced budget.

He asks the question of 'why do we still do this' and ascribes it to the availability of debt.

No, we do this because we like the lifestyle and the space and the chance to be homeowners.  No one in the alt-transit press wants to admit that suburbia is comfortable and convenient and that not everyone wants to live on top of each other like hamsters.

No one's come up with a method of transportation more convenient and more personalized and comfy than the car.  It has no last mile problem.

Few large US cities have done public transportation in a way that makes them attractive and desirable to live in.  The best example of high density living that actually works is Tokyo (and most of Japan).  You can take a train anywhere you want and get within two blocks of your destination usually.  They are fast, on time, frequent and spotless.  Compare and contrast to even New York (I'm looking at you, Pizza Rat and skeevy subway denizens) and there's not much comparison.   But it's still not for everyone. I like VISITING Tokyo, and experiencing the hustle bustle, but then I want to go home and enjoy living there.

I've seen so many US cities initiate public transportation programs that are woefully inadequate to the task and end up being a boondoggle.  San Jose's light rail system is a good example.   They built a light rail system that converged on a downtown transit mall that was supposed to be the next hot thing.   Trouble was the Light rail system left large swaths of suburbs unserved, and if you had to get in your car to get to the light rail station, you might as well just stay in it because you'll save two hours at the end of the day because light rail is so slow.  Only certain use cases work where people live along the line and happen to work along the line as well.   The transit mall ended up being mostly empty of people and businesses.   Why bother when there are so many better and more convenient options in the burbs.

I'm not saying the maintenance issue isn't a problem, but the cities I am familiar with have a good handle on it and are in the black. The ones that typically go bankrupt are cities that are tied to a single industry that tanks, leaving everyone holding the bag.   These cities are typically not near other urban centers that can use them as a bedroom community.   So they stand and fall on their own and are vunerable.


Small towns have all the pros of suburbs and none of the negatives.

You get similar land and home, but it isn't a 15 mile walk to stores, bars, etc.
 
2021-01-18 10:30:04 PM  
Any escape might help dispel the unattractive truth.
 
2021-01-18 11:09:20 PM  

majestic: TheSubjunctive: hlehmann: I've seen ones where you can't possibly reach even a grocery store without getting in your car.  The neighborhoods are anti pedestrian,

Shoot, that hardly requires megasprawl.  I can find you any number of Southern (and outside the South, but worst there) towns of 5-15 thousand, that haven't been growing, that are like 6-8 square miles, where both Walmart and the Piggly Wiggly are absolutely unreachable by foot/bike by any measure of safety (no-shoulder no-sidewalk, have to use a busy four-plus lane road).  Places where you can live 500 feet from a Walmart as-the-crow-flies, and you absolutely, positively have to drive to get there.

I could easily walk to the grocery store. It's the walk back that would be problematic. Just the toilet paper and paper towels would take up a bunch of my wingspan. I'd guess our average grocery trip weighs about 50 lbs. So, I think I'll keep taking the car for that.


i.ebayimg.comView Full Size


Hola!
 
2021-01-18 11:14:13 PM  
Not enough info in vid to make me buy the guy's argument, or even want to look into it more.  Maybe if I were currently househunting.
It needs a detailed breakdown of costs/taxes to show this is actually a thing, and not just cherrypicking a couple poorly run neighborhoods to show cars are bad.
 
2021-01-18 11:26:06 PM  

Smackledorfer: harlock: I live in a small town that is all suburban, and has a balanced budget.

He asks the question of 'why do we still do this' and ascribes it to the availability of debt.

No, we do this because we like the lifestyle and the space and the chance to be homeowners.  No one in the alt-transit press wants to admit that suburbia is comfortable and convenient and that not everyone wants to live on top of each other like hamsters.

No one's come up with a method of transportation more convenient and more personalized and comfy than the car.  It has no last mile problem.

Few large US cities have done public transportation in a way that makes them attractive and desirable to live in.  The best example of high density living that actually works is Tokyo (and most of Japan).  You can take a train anywhere you want and get within two blocks of your destination usually.  They are fast, on time, frequent and spotless.  Compare and contrast to even New York (I'm looking at you, Pizza Rat and skeevy subway denizens) and there's not much comparison.   But it's still not for everyone. I like VISITING Tokyo, and experiencing the hustle bustle, but then I want to go home and enjoy living there.

I've seen so many US cities initiate public transportation programs that are woefully inadequate to the task and end up being a boondoggle.  San Jose's light rail system is a good example.   They built a light rail system that converged on a downtown transit mall that was supposed to be the next hot thing.   Trouble was the Light rail system left large swaths of suburbs unserved, and if you had to get in your car to get to the light rail station, you might as well just stay in it because you'll save two hours at the end of the day because light rail is so slow.  Only certain use cases work where people live along the line and happen to work along the line as well.   The transit mall ended up being mostly empty of people and businesses.   Why bother when there are so many better and more ...


Japan is full of old towns mostly abandoned, with only a handful of octogenarians living in them.
 
2021-01-18 11:27:17 PM  

American-Irish eyes: hlehmann: Rapmaster2000: Subdivisions have existed long before Levitt.  We called them streetcar suburbs.  Plenty of subdivisions retain value and plenty don't.  It's not a problem inherent to suburbs.

Subdivisions have existed for a long time, but in the last few decades they've been turned up to 11.  Visit places like Santa Clarita, CA, or Simi Valley.  Giant sprawling mazes of houses, all beige stucco with red tile roofs.  I've seen ones where you can't possibly reach even a grocery store without getting in your car.  The neighborhoods are anti pedestrian, and there's not enough of a tax base to maintain the streets, sewage systems, etc.,

Santa Clarita and Simi Valley have way better infrastructure (streets, sewage and water) then Los Angeles City and I lived in various parts of LA City and County.  Also, there is a ton of Aerospace companies in Simi Valley and a ton of business in the Santa Clarita valley now.  It's almost like you have actually never been to the two suburbs your talking about.  In fact, in the San Fernando Valley's tax base left the City of Los Angeles that city budget would be unsustainable.  Los Angeles City is an unsustainable mess.


hahahahahahhaah

The Simi Valley municipal budget is an absolute sh*tshow waiting to implode.  Covid just might finally push it over the edge.
 
2021-01-18 11:44:49 PM  
The literature about how much suburbs suck for efficient, common-sense living is well-documented. It was supposed to make us into a car culture, maximize our consumption, and keep us away from the blehs. It worked great.

Fark user imageView Full Size


Fark user imageView Full Size


Fark user imageView Full Size


/Common sense? Efficient? What kind of commie bullshiat is that?
 
2021-01-18 11:53:28 PM  

TheSubjunctive: hlehmann: I've seen ones where you can't possibly reach even a grocery store without getting in your car.  The neighborhoods are anti pedestrian,

Shoot, that hardly requires megasprawl.  I can find you any number of Southern (and outside the South, but worst there) towns of 5-15 thousand, that haven't been growing, that are like 6-8 square miles, where both Walmart and the Piggly Wiggly are absolutely unreachable by foot/bike by any measure of safety (no-shoulder no-sidewalk, have to use a busy four-plus lane road).  Places where you can live 500 feet from a Walmart as-the-crow-flies, and you absolutely, positively have to drive to get there.


Remind me never to live in a place like that.
 
2021-01-18 11:55:38 PM  

Shaggy_C: Protip: buy old, not new. Find a place where there's a proven history of sustained inhabitation.


Fark user imageView Full Size


Those are the best places.
 
2021-01-18 11:59:48 PM  

mybluemake: majestic: TheSubjunctive: hlehmann: I've seen ones where you can't possibly reach even a grocery store without getting in your car.  The neighborhoods are anti pedestrian,

Shoot, that hardly requires megasprawl.  I can find you any number of Southern (and outside the South, but worst there) towns of 5-15 thousand, that haven't been growing, that are like 6-8 square miles, where both Walmart and the Piggly Wiggly are absolutely unreachable by foot/bike by any measure of safety (no-shoulder no-sidewalk, have to use a busy four-plus lane road).  Places where you can live 500 feet from a Walmart as-the-crow-flies, and you absolutely, positively have to drive to get there.

I could easily walk to the grocery store. It's the walk back that would be problematic. Just the toilet paper and paper towels would take up a bunch of my wingspan. I'd guess our average grocery trip weighs about 50 lbs. So, I think I'll keep taking the car for that.

[i.ebayimg.com image 400x400]

Hola!


You have to get the kind that have the bag inside. I don't want everyone seeing that I'm only hauling beer and liquor, instead of groceries at 9:00 am.
 
2021-01-19 12:09:25 AM  
Regardless of the soundness of their argument this video is just a stream of new 'facts' with no supporting arguments. They provide absolutely zero evidence along the way, and it starts to sound like a rant from a loon. They might be right but we'd never know because they just ramble on like your MAGA hat wearing uncle. You can't make a video like this, where you're making some complex financial arguments, without at least describing how you came to your conclusions. Anyway, I made it 4 minutes before turning it off.
 
2021-01-19 12:11:09 AM  

drjekel_mrhyde: mybluemake: majestic: TheSubjunctive: hlehmann: I've seen ones where you can't possibly reach even a grocery store without getting in your car.  The neighborhoods are anti pedestrian,

Shoot, that hardly requires megasprawl.  I can find you any number of Southern (and outside the South, but worst there) towns of 5-15 thousand, that haven't been growing, that are like 6-8 square miles, where both Walmart and the Piggly Wiggly are absolutely unreachable by foot/bike by any measure of safety (no-shoulder no-sidewalk, have to use a busy four-plus lane road).  Places where you can live 500 feet from a Walmart as-the-crow-flies, and you absolutely, positively have to drive to get there.

I could easily walk to the grocery store. It's the walk back that would be problematic. Just the toilet paper and paper towels would take up a bunch of my wingspan. I'd guess our average grocery trip weighs about 50 lbs. So, I think I'll keep taking the car for that.

[i.ebayimg.com image 400x400]

Hola!

You have to get the kind that have the bag inside. I don't want everyone seeing that I'm only hauling beer and liquor, instead of groceries at 9:00 am.


I agree, it's such a pain in the arse when they expect you to share. No this is my alcohol, go get your own Chad!
 
2021-01-19 12:14:33 AM  
It's only a possibility scheme if the city keeps saying it can afford to repave.

After a certain point, the suburbs will either see a tax hike or gravel roads.

And they'll be the new city-country living.
 
2021-01-19 12:39:56 AM  

hlehmann: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: hlehmann: I've seen ones where you can't possibly reach even a grocery store without getting in your car.

So... most of Cali then?

/lived here all my life - when it was in such a place I was never in sane walking distance of a store.

I live in one of the subdivisions that was built in the post war years.  I can, and do, walk to a couple of different grocery stores, the drug store, my bank, a 7-11, a barber (in the before times), and decent Mexican and Thai takeout places. Some communities here are set up for it, some most certainly are not.


Fair - I may have just hit the lottery wrong on which ones I ended up in.  Often more of a "because it's available for what I can afford" thing than a choice thing so that might well play into it.  Kinda jealous.  Be nice to be able to hobble down the road a bit for a burrito or something
 
2021-01-19 12:43:03 AM  

hlehmann: Rapmaster2000: Subdivisions have existed long before Levitt.  We called them streetcar suburbs.  Plenty of subdivisions retain value and plenty don't.  It's not a problem inherent to suburbs.

Subdivisions have existed for a long time, but in the last few decades they've been turned up to 11.  Visit places like Santa Clarita, CA, or Simi Valley.  Giant sprawling mazes of houses, all beige stucco with red tile roofs.  I've seen ones where you can't possibly reach even a grocery store without getting in your car.  The neighborhoods are anti pedestrian, and there's not enough of a tax base to maintain the streets, sewage systems, etc.,


I used to live at the top of the Texas trac in Simi valley. There was nothing but a ranch on the backside in the 80s even early 90s. Just cows grazing on the fence line.

Rocketdyne rumbling the windows from the other side of the valley.

Did a check on the childhood home a decade ago and it was all suburban tile roof tickey tack connecting the south end of Simi to the valley.

It's the ooze. shiatty suburban sprawl.

It's why I don't live there anymore.
 
2021-01-19 12:46:09 AM  

xanderak: Not enough info in vid to make me buy the guy's argument, or even want to look into it more.  Maybe if I were currently househunting.
It needs a detailed breakdown of costs/taxes to show this is actually a thing, and not just cherrypicking a couple poorly run neighborhoods to show cars are bad.


It's not his argument. It is Charles Marohn's argument

https://www.amazon.com/Strong-Towns-B​o​ttom-Up-Revolution-Prosperity-ebook/dp​/B07YGC4K4V
 
2021-01-19 1:59:43 AM  

Rapmaster2000: Watched the video. It's about aging infrastructure.  Misleading headline.


Yeah, it's lacking the scheme part.

And it sounds like the infrastructure problem could be solved via a higher tax rate. Or that the government could just step in and pay for the existing infrastructure, instead of constantly expanding.
 
2021-01-19 2:11:17 AM  
All the included houses looked depressing and cheaply build, probably on purpose.

The most interesting thing to me, is that this guy seems to have a grudge against Taco John's, mentioning them per name, kinda out of the blue, claiming that cities would get so desperate that they would even accept a Taco John's.

I want to find out more about this bearer of the plague, masquerading as a TexMex.
 
2021-01-19 2:38:41 AM  

Smackledorfer: Small towns have all the pros of suburbs and none of the negatives.


Their schools are, almost always, nowhere near as good as decent-or-better suburban schools.

Otherwise, yes, any of: urban; rural; or small-town living, would be preferable to the hellscape that is the suburbs. The schools are the only thing they have going for them.

Small town downtowns rock. I'd love to live in some 1930s all-brick nigh-mansion just off a small-town downtown, for less than my suburban mid-market house cost. Maybe I'd also buy a storefront and have a used bookstore that's only open on Saturdays for six hours. Fark it, why not. I'd have like five repeat customers whom I'd know well, but I'd remain aloof enough that we'd never really be friends, unless they found themselves at the center of some kind of supernatural adventure. It'd be perfect.
 
2021-01-19 3:58:11 AM  
What's it like to own a home, and land?
 
Displayed 50 of 76 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.