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(National Review)   Say hello to cultured meat, the era of cruel industrial animal farming is finally being slaughtered   (nationalreview.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Livestock, Agriculture, Meat, cells of an animal, L ast month, merciless treatment of other creatures, industrial animal farming, practical indifference  
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382 clicks; posted to Food » on 18 Jan 2021 at 12:25 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



33 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-01-18 11:39:59 AM  
I watch "Industrial Animal Farming" out my back door most of the year. Cattle wander around aimlessly munching munching munching. When the snow comes, the ranchers lay out huge bales of hay every day. Once a year, they all get corraled and the vet looks them over and they get shots. They don't like the shots. When winter really settles in, they move them all to the main ranch where they have more shelter. Eventually, their day comes and it's off to the slaughterhouse. They've learned to do that as humanely as possible. The worst that has ever happened is one died after eating a plastic bag last year.

There is no "cruel." That's just veegan marketing.
 
2021-01-18 11:52:00 AM  
The technology could lead a whole revolution in food and medical production. Imagine cacao that was lab grown, vanilla, saffron, or tuna or other over-fished species, as well as plant based pharmaceuticals. Or animal based as well for insulin. Or donor tissue. Skin grown for grafts, cultured to end fears of rejection. Same for bone or even whole organs.

It's a very exciting technology.
 
2021-01-18 12:14:43 PM  

hubiestubert: It's a very exciting technology.


It is.

And these guys just about had it nailed 10 years ago -
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-01-18 12:31:14 PM  

edmo: I watch "Industrial Animal Farming" out my back door most of the year. Cattle wander around aimlessly munching munching munching. When the snow comes, the ranchers lay out huge bales of hay every day. Once a year, they all get corraled and the vet looks them over and they get shots. They don't like the shots. When winter really settles in, they move them all to the main ranch where they have more shelter. Eventually, their day comes and it's off to the slaughterhouse. They've learned to do that as humanely as possible. The worst that has ever happened is one died after eating a plastic bag last year.
There is no "cruel." That's just veegan marketing.


a whole 20% of our cows are raised that way. Mostly on public lands that belong to you and me. We also export a huge amount of beef, so that means that we're using most of our federal lands--all of the resources, money, corn, and water to send our beef to other countries, because we have SO MANY cows, and most of them live in an environment they were not meant to live in, that is now degraded as fark because of over 100 years of overgrazing.
Not to mention the generous subsidies that we give ranchers to keep those cows out there. The government pays for a lot of public lands grazing, just like they pay farmers to do or not do things.

This seems humane and practical:

From 2015 to 2019, over 60 percent of the cattle imported came from Mexico, and nearly all of them were lighter-weight cattle intended for stocker or feeder operations in the United States. Of the cattle imports from Canada, almost 70 percent were destined for immediate slaughter; on average, 60 percent of these were fed steers and heifers and 40 percent were cows and bulls. The remaining 30 percent of the cattle imported from Canada went to U.S. feedlots for finishing.

Feedlots. The bigger they get, the bigger environmental nightmare they are. If we had some sense, we could recycle all that shiat right back to farms, but I suppose that wouldn't be profitable enough.

Fark user imageView Full Size


Pools of piss. Acres of cow shiat. Hormones and shots and crowding and stink and noise. Then death. So we can enjoy some more status, because we sure as fark don't need the calories.

Fark user imageView Full Size


And that's just the stuff I can think of right away.
 
2021-01-18 12:33:37 PM  

edmo: There is no "cruel." That's just veegan marketing.


Cool anecdote, bro.

Meanwhile, in the rest of the United States:
cornucopia.orgView Full Size

Can I have my well done steak with sewage and antibiotics on the side please? Oh, I see, it's already in the prepackaged ingredients. Thanks anyways.


Personally, I'll be thrilled when we can replace this disgusting industry with something slightly less disgusting from a lab.
 
2021-01-18 12:47:37 PM  
*curtsies*

How do you do, cultured meat?
 
2021-01-18 1:10:01 PM  
It took 70 years, but H. Beam Piper will be proven correct.
 
2021-01-18 1:13:58 PM  
Everyone on here will be dead by the time this takes off
 
2021-01-18 1:22:44 PM  

drjekel_mrhyde: Everyone on here will be dead by the time this takes off


They will pry my grass fed steak from my cold dead hands
 
2021-01-18 1:26:40 PM  
Entire breeds of livestock will go extinct.
 
2021-01-18 1:45:43 PM  

Ambivalence: Entire breeds of livestock will go extinct.


Some likely will, but as soon as vat grown meat hits the market, there will be prestige to "real meat" and ranchers bright enough will cultivate only the best for upscale markets. And that will mean the same thing that occurred with "heirloom produce." There will conservation of breeds, and even a resurgence of older ones.

People will still be able to get "real meat" but it will be much more expensive.
 
2021-01-18 1:49:58 PM  
Nah nothing compares to the extra deliciousness imparted into duck liver by force-feeding it via a tube.
 
2021-01-18 1:53:45 PM  
Cultured meat? Like a d*ck in yogurt?
 
2021-01-18 1:54:26 PM  

hubiestubert: Ambivalence: Entire breeds of livestock will go extinct.

Some likely will, but as soon as vat grown meat hits the market, there will be prestige to "real meat" and ranchers bright enough will cultivate only the best for upscale markets. And that will mean the same thing that occurred with "heirloom produce." There will conservation of breeds, and even a resurgence of older ones.

People will still be able to get "real meat" but it will be much more expensive.



hopefully our soylent will be green.  :D
 
2021-01-18 2:14:50 PM  
web.archive.orgView Full Size
 
2021-01-18 3:02:06 PM  
I found it really interesting that during the 2020 campaign season I saw several ads from Iowa meat producers talking about how great real meat is and how those fake meats are inferior. I've never seen an ad like that before. I can't imagine they would have taken the time to make and air it if they weren't concerned about Beyond burgers and similar.
 
2021-01-18 3:49:10 PM  
So if a group of people are into this thing will they be called a Culture Club?
 
2021-01-18 4:05:35 PM  
architecturehereandthere.files.wordpress.comView Full Size
 
2021-01-18 4:06:37 PM  
I still won't be able to digest meat, but this sounds like a nice option for those people who can eat meat without a once a month trip to the emergency room.
 
2021-01-18 4:28:05 PM  

Shaggy_C: edmo: There is no "cruel." That's just veegan marketing.

Cool anecdote, bro.

Meanwhile, in the rest of the United States:
[cornucopia.org image 500x282]
Can I have my well done steak with sewage and antibiotics on the side please? Oh, I see, it's already in the prepackaged ingredients. Thanks anyways.


Personally, I'll be thrilled when we can replace this disgusting industry with something slightly less disgusting from a lab.


This. There are reasons why well over a hundred countries do not allow US beef to be imported.

European meats are amazing and you cannot find anything like them in the US, save a couple really expensive farms with really high standards.

/our egg and chicken production is appalling.
 
2021-01-18 5:34:26 PM  
Let's meet the meat, shall we?

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-01-18 5:39:27 PM  

fark account name: Let's meet the meat, shall we?

[Fark user image 850x637]


"Would you rather eat an animal that doesn't want to get eaten?"
"Yes! No! I don't know. Can I have a salad?"
 
2021-01-18 5:44:14 PM  
The fact that this article is from National Review surprises me the most.
 
2021-01-18 6:06:05 PM  

hubiestubert: The technology could lead a whole revolution in food and medical production. Imagine cacao that was lab grown, vanilla, saffron, or tuna or other over-fished species, as well as plant based pharmaceuticals. Or animal based as well for insulin. Or donor tissue. Skin grown for grafts, cultured to end fears of rejection. Same for bone or even whole organs.

It's a very exciting technology.


Well see this all looks nice but let's ask ourselves who is really going to be able to afford it?

The upper class while the rest of us lower class citizens who don't have the money for this water wasting pointless exercise in avoiding feeling bad for being part of the food chain.
 
2021-01-18 6:08:11 PM  

hubiestubert: Ambivalence: Entire breeds of livestock will go extinct.

Some likely will, but as soon as vat grown meat hits the market, there will be prestige to "real meat" and ranchers bright enough will cultivate only the best for upscale markets. And that will mean the same thing that occurred with "heirloom produce." There will conservation of breeds, and even a resurgence of older ones.

People will still be able to get "real meat" but it will be much more expensive.


And then that is where the class war begins.
 
2021-01-18 6:30:05 PM  

alice_600: hubiestubert: The technology could lead a whole revolution in food and medical production. Imagine cacao that was lab grown, vanilla, saffron, or tuna or other over-fished species, as well as plant based pharmaceuticals. Or animal based as well for insulin. Or donor tissue. Skin grown for grafts, cultured to end fears of rejection. Same for bone or even whole organs.

It's a very exciting technology.

Well see this all looks nice but let's ask ourselves who is really going to be able to afford it?

The upper class while the rest of us lower class citizens who don't have the money for this water wasting pointless exercise in avoiding feeling bad for being part of the food chain.


At first? Maybe. Mature tech will make long term colonization possible. It could literally save endangered species, provide cheap proteins, revolutionize pharmaceuticals.

The first automobile had .75 horsepower. Things have come along a bit since then.
 
2021-01-18 9:17:03 PM  

Snaptastic: European meats are amazing and you cannot find anything like them in the US


European beef is dogshiat, if you go to a halfway decent steak house it would always be imported from Argentina or Oz.

Their pork is better though, Germans like raw minced pork slathered on bread for breakfast and yet they have lower trichinosis rates than the US.

Pretty sure I wouldn't be eating raw American produced pork.
 
2021-01-18 9:36:31 PM  

alice_600: And then that is where the class war begins.


"begins"?


We've been having a class war ever since the Reagan days.
 
2021-01-18 9:48:37 PM  
When they can grow this
Fark user imageView Full Size

Sign me up.
 
2021-01-18 10:36:20 PM  

Excelsior: alice_600: And then that is where the class war begins.

"begins"?


We've been having a class war ever since the Reagan days.


Look this is just too good to be true. This is grown in a lab meat it needs chemicals and a ton of water to make lab grown meat when all we need to do is enforce the current laws and increase standards for farming. Again this is just so people can not feel guilty for being a human being.
 
2021-01-19 12:55:54 AM  
isn't it still like $1000/lb?

also, oblig.

Fark user imageView Full Size


NINEv2: When they can grow this
[Fark user image 364x750]
Sign me up.


I may be a vegulon, but... NOM! yeah, it's gonna take thems scienticians years/decades of tuning to produce something that cooks like that.
 
2021-01-19 2:12:14 AM  

hubiestubert: The technology could lead a whole revolution in food and medical production. Imagine cacao that was lab grown, vanilla, saffron, or tuna or other over-fished species, as well as plant based pharmaceuticals. Or animal based as well for insulin. Or donor tissue. Skin grown for grafts, cultured to end fears of rejection. Same for bone or even whole organs.

It's a very exciting technology.


Imagine cultured human meat. The billionaires wouldn't have to eat the flesh of the poor.
 
2021-01-19 3:21:30 AM  

anuran: hubiestubert: The technology could lead a whole revolution in food and medical production. Imagine cacao that was lab grown, vanilla, saffron, or tuna or other over-fished species, as well as plant based pharmaceuticals. Or animal based as well for insulin. Or donor tissue. Skin grown for grafts, cultured to end fears of rejection. Same for bone or even whole organs.

It's a very exciting technology.

Imagine cultured human meat. The billionaires wouldn't have to eat the flesh of the poor.


(see above) - one imagines they'd be much more interested in eating their own cloned flesh, no?
 
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