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(BookRiot)   In the 60s dad got 2 computer programming books, one red and one blue. Each had a cloth bookmark just like dad's bibles. They were of the "read this page and choose which page to goto next". I learned programming from them. DIT   (bookriot.com) divider line
    More: Misc, Programming language, computer fluency, First C, computer science, computer science books, Learn Java, gonna want, computer language  
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1314 clicks; posted to Discussion » and STEM » on 17 Jan 2021 at 9:41 PM (11 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-01-17 6:19:57 PM  
Subby here.  Back in the 80s, when I was making good coin as an 8086 assembly programmer I asked dad about those books.  He didn't remember them.  I searched the house, no joy.  Dad was more an EE than a programmer.

I'm old and have $$$, and I'd love to track down those 2 old books.  Anyone have a clue?
 
2021-01-17 6:29:56 PM  
Have you tried asking this on the vintage computing companion site of Stack Overflow?

https://retrocomputing.stackexchange.​c​om/
 
2021-01-17 6:46:06 PM  

Snotnose: Subby here.  Back in the 80s, when I was making good coin as an 8086 assembly programmer I asked dad about those books.  He didn't remember them.  I searched the house, no joy.  Dad was more an EE than a programmer.

I'm old and have $$$, and I'd love to track down those 2 old books.  Anyone have a clue?


You also need to realize that a lot of books only had limited prints and you could take a book you had like those to a print shop and have them print you a couple of customer copies with any top of cover you wanted.
 
2021-01-17 6:51:41 PM  
I was playing with 6502 code and 6809 code in the 80s.  Never moved into the x86 architecture.  Stepped up into C when the 6502 architecture went by the wayside.

Good times.  Good times.
 
2021-01-17 6:53:58 PM  
I believe "The Art of Computer Programming"was one of the better known books on computer programming from the 60s. It has been added to over the years and is now up to 5 volumes but I think it started out as two or three volumes.
 
2021-01-17 6:59:05 PM  
If you could provide a bit more information, it would be helpful.  Early 80s or late?  How large were the books?  Were the soft or hard bound?  Were they textbooks or reference manuals?  Do you know what language(s) they covered?  In 1977 had a red textbook for FORTRAN IV programming with WATFOR/WATFIV, but that's probably not what you want.

Back in the early 80s, compilers often sported vendor-specific extensions, so the only language reference was the manual (or manual set) published by the vendor themselves.  Did either of these books bear the name of a system vendor of the day?  DEC, CDC, IBM early in the decade, with microcomputer vendors like MODCOMP, Apollo, Sun Microsystems, Intergraph, and others.

I did use some microcomputers during that time, too.  Most were running CP/M or proprietary OSs, with DOS coming in later.  There were a few high-level languages for all of these (the CP/M FORTRAN compiler gave a 2-character error code on abort, and nothing else.  If you had a divide by zero it would say *DZ* on the console).  I don't remember what color the manuals were, but with sufficient information you should be able to mine places like Powell's Technical Books in Portland, which has a great used section that goes way back.  eBay is also an option for quite a few things, I've found.

/ Adventure was about 700 lines of FORTRAN code
// The start of natural language processing
/// You are standing at the end of a road before a small brick building.  Around you is a forest.  A small stream flows out of the building and down a small gully.
//// xyzzy
 
2021-01-17 6:59:56 PM  
Z80 programming 2716/2732 EEproms with a Prolog M910. Miss those days. Also early 80's. Went to C under CP/M at some point (IIRC).
 
2021-01-17 7:16:16 PM  

unixpro: If you could provide a bit more information, it would be helpful.  Early 80s or late?  How large were the books?  Were the soft or hard bound?  Were they textbooks or reference manuals?  Do you know what language(s) they covered?  In 1977 had a red textbook for FORTRAN IV programming with WATFOR/WATFIV, but that's probably not what you want.

Back in the early 80s, compilers often sported vendor-specific extensions, so the only language reference was the manual (or manual set) published by the vendor themselves.  Did either of these books bear the name of a system vendor of the day?  DEC, CDC, IBM early in the decade, with microcomputer vendors like MODCOMP, Apollo, Sun Microsystems, Intergraph, and others.

I did use some microcomputers during that time, too.  Most were running CP/M or proprietary OSs, with DOS coming in later.  There were a few high-level languages for all of these (the CP/M FORTRAN compiler gave a 2-character error code on abort, and nothing else.  If you had a divide by zero it would say *DZ* on the console).  I don't remember what color the manuals were, but with sufficient information you should be able to mine places like Powell's Technical Books in Portland, which has a great used section that goes way back.  eBay is also an option for quite a few things, I've found.

/ Adventure was about 700 lines of FORTRAN code
// The start of natural language processing
/// You are standing at the end of a road before a small brick building.  Around you is a forest.  A small stream flows out of the building and down a small gully.
//// xyzzy


I actually may have a print out of that buried somewhere here. Version was "Mystery Mansion" that ran on an HP-1000 RTE.
 
2021-01-17 7:51:26 PM  

unixpro: but with sufficient information you should be able to mine places like Powell's Technical Books in Portland, which has a great used section that goes way back. eBay is also an option for quite a few things, I've found.


If you can come up with a title, ABE is a great place to find most any book (hundreds of used book dealers from around the world)
 
2021-01-17 8:02:44 PM  
Yeah, I was into the Intel/Zilog architectures in the early 80s, before I cut across to C and Pascal. Wrote a terminal emulator for IBM PC in assembly, and later converted it to C, and then to Delphi/Object Pascal. Then I got into Java, but these days, I'm all about C#.
I'm not proud of it, but I also spent a lot of time working in various flavours of business BASIC back in the day. It paid the bills. And being able to break out to lower-level coding elevated me above the pack.
 
2021-01-17 9:22:54 PM  
lh3.googleusercontent.comView Full Size
 
2021-01-17 9:27:32 PM  
They were of the "read this page and choose which page to goto next".

So they were like a "Choose Your Own Adventure" book, but for programming?

Were they bound or wire spiraled? I vaguely remember some bound ones, but one was yellow and I think the other was red.
 
2021-01-17 9:51:54 PM  
I spent some time a day or two ago watching an episode of Bits And Bites with Billy Van and Luba Goy on youtube. It's cringeworthy, though that may have something to do with it being Canadian.
 
2021-01-17 9:52:11 PM  
I have a friend who taught herself to program with Forth on a Macintosh. (That's the way I heard it.)
 
2021-01-17 9:54:41 PM  
I learned to program on TRS-80s at school and on my TI-99/4A at home. Was that wrong? Should I not have done that? I tell you, I gotta plead ignorance on this thing, because if anyone had said anything to me at all when I first started that that sort of thing is frowned upon... you know, people did that all the time.
 
2021-01-17 9:57:53 PM  

Unscratchable_Itch: I learned to program on TRS-80s at school and on my TI-99/4A at home. Was that wrong? Should I not have done that? I tell you, I gotta plead ignorance on this thing, because if anyone had said anything to me at all when I first started that that sort of thing is frowned upon... you know, people did that all the time.


I learned to program on an HP-41C.
 
2021-01-17 10:10:31 PM  

Unscratchable_Itch: I learned to program on TRS-80s at school and on my TI-99/4A at home. Was that wrong? Should I not have done that? I tell you, I gotta plead ignorance on this thing, because if anyone had said anything to me at all when I first started that that sort of thing is frowned upon... you know, people did that all the time.


Ahhh... the old Trash-80.  They were great fun.

RAY_
 
2021-01-17 10:17:45 PM  
Old as dirt.

1971- programming in COBOL for ICL System 4/50. Coding on sheets, sheets sent to punch card operators, punch cards verified by a card to printer run, usually to a TTY terminal.  Rinse, repeat.

Then cards topped and tailed with JCL cards, batched, uploaded to tape. Tape job verified/corrected.

Book overnight compilation run, because day shift is for actual production. Run compilation, get error report. Go back to step 1 as required.

All this meant you were working on several different projects in parallel, and not necessarily in sequence within project. Fun times.

Also, some things required Fortran modules, and other bits ( like merging tape and disc records) might be done in assembler language.

All this and mismanaging a new and ultimately unsuccessful marriage made being a grunt look a simpler life...
 
2021-01-17 10:25:19 PM  

Snotnose: Subby here.  Back in the 80s, when I was making good coin as an 8086 assembly programmer I asked dad about those books.  He didn't remember them.  I searched the house, no joy.  Dad was more an EE than a programmer.

I'm old and have $$$, and I'd love to track down those 2 old books.  Anyone have a clue?


Fark user imageView Full Size
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(Leventhal had a whole series of these.) Before the common title design,
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one was even red.

I'm with unixpro here -- what platform did you cut your teeth on? CPU? OS?
One random shot -- more of a CS thing than an assembly thing:
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or
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or
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Do these ring a bell? Amazon says these were from 1969 and 1970 respectively. A little before my time, but same publishing house and binding, correct timeframe, correct color.

Whatever the answer is - if you find it, let us know!
 
2021-01-17 10:29:31 PM  
Insufficient Data for a Meaningful Answer.

What language were they for, or what system, or were they just generic programming logic based?  You say he was an electrical engineer, were they on how to link together actual physical transistors and stuff to hardwire a program?

Around what year?  Early, Mid, or Late 60s? (Probably late)

Were the covers a light or dark shade of their respective colors?
 
2021-01-17 10:35:38 PM  

Ken S.: Unscratchable_Itch: I learned to program on TRS-80s at school and on my TI-99/4A at home. Was that wrong? Should I not have done that? I tell you, I gotta plead ignorance on this thing, because if anyone had said anything to me at all when I first started that that sort of thing is frowned upon... you know, people did that all the time.

I learned to program on an HP-41C.


A friend's TI-57 in my case, later I got my very own TI-58c. I could not have afforded an HP-41 back then. My everyday calculator is an HP-42s that I bought July 12 1991 (I have the bill taped inside the manual).
 
2021-01-17 11:12:01 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size

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I learned by meticulously typing in the programs printed in the pages of these books. I remember making a hot air ballon sprite. Neato!

Then I made a password protect program for games I didn't want my big brother to play, but I messed up the password and locked myself out :(
 
2021-01-17 11:14:57 PM  

Ken S.: Unscratchable_Itch: I learned to program on TRS-80s at school and on my TI-99/4A at home. Was that wrong? Should I not have done that? I tell you, I gotta plead ignorance on this thing, because if anyone had said anything to me at all when I first started that that sort of thing is frowned upon... you know, people did that all the time.

I learned to program on an HP-41C.


I still have mine, and the math and stat pack, and it all works. Even the keyboard overlays!

However I use a 35s now, cheap and uses reasonable batteries.
 
2021-01-17 11:19:57 PM  

talkertopc: Ken S.: Unscratchable_Itch: I learned to program on TRS-80s at school and on my TI-99/4A at home. Was that wrong? Should I not have done that? I tell you, I gotta plead ignorance on this thing, because if anyone had said anything to me at all when I first started that that sort of thing is frowned upon... you know, people did that all the time.

I learned to program on an HP-41C.

A friend's TI-57 in my case, later I got my very own TI-58c. I could not have afforded an HP-41 back then. My everyday calculator is an HP-42s that I bought July 12 1991 (I have the bill taped inside the manual).


The HP-42 is a great calculator, but hampered by a small memory and no I/O. If you ever need to replace it SwissMicros makes a new version, the DM42 with more memory and input output. They aren't cheap but 42s are collectible so you would pay as much for a 30 year old calculator which might fail.
 
2021-01-17 11:20:10 PM  
the only book I ever needed

th.bing.comView Full Size
 
2021-01-17 11:20:47 PM  

Wine Sipping Elitist: [Fark user image image 425x573]
[Fark user image image 240x349]

I learned by meticulously typing in the programs printed in the pages of these books. I remember making a hot air ballon sprite. Neato!

Then I made a password protect program for games I didn't want my big brother to play, but I messed up the password and locked myself out :(


The musical keyboard program at the end of that Commodore 64 book was friggin awesome! I modded the hell out of it. Could go from playing piano to the harp to what sounded like a cacophony of giant diesel engines.
 
2021-01-17 11:44:36 PM  
OH, Details In Thread.

I read DTF and clicked the button so hard my ISP called me.
 
2021-01-18 3:44:31 AM  

The Googles Do Nothing: [lh3.googleusercontent.com image 350x512]


honestly programming was way easier to get into back in the day.
 
2021-01-18 8:17:58 AM  
More info.  They were hardbound from the late 60s or early 70s.  I suspect they were on some assembly language, but they may have just been high level concepts.  The books were a set, the second took over where the first ended.  The book sleeves were red (one book) and blue (the other one), I don't know what the actual cover looked like.

Dad was an EE working on military aircraft.  It was in the 80s when I was getting paid to write 8086 assembly that I asked dad about them.

Every page explained a concept, and at the bottom would be something like:

x = 4
y = x + 3
What is the value of y?

3.  goto page 72
4.  goto page 24
7.  goto page 34
 
2021-01-18 9:29:38 AM  

Recoil Therapy: unixpro: but with sufficient information you should be able to mine places like Powell's Technical Books in Portland, which has a great used section that goes way back. eBay is also an option for quite a few things, I've found.

If you can come up with a title, ABE is a great place to find most any book (hundreds of used book dealers from around the world)


+1 for ABE Books, Alibris (owned now by Amazon, I believe) is also a good source. And don't forget Powell's in Portland
 
2021-01-18 9:32:44 AM  

b0rscht: Ken S.: Unscratchable_Itch: I learned to program on TRS-80s at school and on my TI-99/4A at home. Was that wrong? Should I not have done that? I tell you, I gotta plead ignorance on this thing, because if anyone had said anything to me at all when I first started that that sort of thing is frowned upon... you know, people did that all the time.

I learned to program on an HP-41C.

I still have mine, and the math and stat pack, and it all works. Even the keyboard overlays!

However I use a 35s now, cheap and uses reasonable batteries.


I have an HP-25 (bought in grad school) and an HP-41C.

I now use the V41 emulator on Windows and in WINE on Linux, and i41CX+ on my iPhone.
 
2021-01-18 11:36:55 AM  

Ken S.: Unscratchable_Itch: I learned to program on TRS-80s at school and on my TI-99/4A at home. Was that wrong? Should I not have done that? I tell you, I gotta plead ignorance on this thing, because if anyone had said anything to me at all when I first started that that sort of thing is frowned upon... you know, people did that all the time.

I learned to program on an HP-41C.


RPN for the win.  We used them for Radar Evaluation work in the Air Force.  We had one or two equations that required 4 or 5 memory strips each.  When the first laptops started surfacing, I started moving the equations into basic and then into spreadsheets.  It was good practice and led to the downfall of our squadron's mainframe computer.
 
2021-01-18 11:57:33 AM  

Snotnose: More info.  They were hardbound from the late 60s or early 70s.  I suspect they were on some assembly language, but they may have just been high level concepts.  The books were a set, the second took over where the first ended.  The book sleeves were red (one book) and blue (the other one), I don't know what the actual cover looked like.

Dad was an EE working on military aircraft.  It was in the 80s when I was getting paid to write 8086 assembly that I asked dad about them.

Every page explained a concept, and at the bottom would be something like:

x = 4
y = x + 3
What is the value of y?

3.  goto page 72
4.  goto page 24
7.  goto page 34


Page 34 is where the porn is, that's the rule.
 
2021-01-18 12:25:11 PM  

Hospitaller: Ken S.: Unscratchable_Itch: I learned to program on TRS-80s at school and on my TI-99/4A at home. Was that wrong? Should I not have done that? I tell you, I gotta plead ignorance on this thing, because if anyone had said anything to me at all when I first started that that sort of thing is frowned upon... you know, people did that all the time.

I learned to program on an HP-41C.

RPN for the win.  We used them for Radar Evaluation work in the Air Force.  We had one or two equations that required 4 or 5 memory strips each.  When the first laptops started surfacing, I started moving the equations into basic and then into spreadsheets.  It was good practice and led to the downfall of our squadron's mainframe computer.


I hope that's just the movie's working title and you can come up with something better before the box office release. 😂
 
2021-01-18 1:10:32 PM  

LarrySouth: Old as dirt.

1971- programming in COBOL for ICL System 4/50. Coding on sheets, sheets sent to punch card operators, punch cards verified by a card to printer run, usually to a TTY terminal.  Rinse, repeat.

Then cards topped and tailed with JCL cards, batched, uploaded to tape. Tape job verified/corrected.

Book overnight compilation run, because day shift is for actual production. Run compilation, get error report. Go back to step 1 as required.

All this meant you were working on several different projects in parallel, and not necessarily in sequence within project. Fun times.

Also, some things required Fortran modules, and other bits ( like merging tape and disc records) might be done in assembler language.

All this and mismanaging a new and ultimately unsuccessful marriage made being a grunt look a simpler life...


Uh, fark that shiat!
 
2021-01-18 1:57:40 PM  

turboke: Hospitaller: Ken S.: Unscratchable_Itch: I learned to program on TRS-80s at school and on my TI-99/4A at home. Was that wrong? Should I not have done that? I tell you, I gotta plead ignorance on this thing, because if anyone had said anything to me at all when I first started that that sort of thing is frowned upon... you know, people did that all the time.

I learned to program on an HP-41C.

RPN for the win.  We used them for Radar Evaluation work in the Air Force.  We had one or two equations that required 4 or 5 memory strips each.  When the first laptops started surfacing, I started moving the equations into basic and then into spreadsheets.  It was good practice and led to the downfall of our squadron's mainframe computer.

I hope that's just the movie's working title and you can come up with something better before the box office release. 😂


1983: A Sea Odyssey.
 
2021-01-18 2:07:42 PM  

The Googles Do Nothing: [lh3.googleusercontent.com image 350x512]


I had that book.
 
2021-01-18 2:28:27 PM  

Snotnose: More info.  They were hardbound from the late 60s or early 70s.  I suspect they were on some assembly language, but they may have just been high level concepts.  The books were a set, the second took over where the first ended.  The book sleeves were red (one book) and blue (the other one), I don't know what the actual cover looked like.

Dad was an EE working on military aircraft.  It was in the 80s when I was getting paid to write 8086 assembly that I asked dad about them.

Every page explained a concept, and at the bottom would be something like:

x = 4
y = x + 3
What is the value of y?

3.  goto page 72
4.  goto page 24
7.  goto page 34


Fark user imageView Full Size
Fark user imageView Full Size

Fark user imageView Full Size


That sounds like a TutorText! https://hackaday.com/2020/08/28/a-tal​e​-of-tutor-texts/

Fark user imageView Full Size
Fark user imageView Full Size
Fark user imageView Full Size
Fark user imageView Full Size



Do these look familiar? (https://babel.hathitrust.o​rg/cgi/pt?id​=mdp.39015033508683&view=1up&seq=7 via https://hackaday.com/2017/10/13/compu​t​ers-that-never-were/
 
2021-01-18 2:58:36 PM  

turboke: Hospitaller: Ken S.: Unscratchable_Itch: I learned to program on TRS-80s at school and on my TI-99/4A at home. Was that wrong? Should I not have done that? I tell you, I gotta plead ignorance on this thing, because if anyone had said anything to me at all when I first started that that sort of thing is frowned upon... you know, people did that all the time.

I learned to program on an HP-41C.

RPN for the win.  We used them for Radar Evaluation work in the Air Force.  We had one or two equations that required 4 or 5 memory strips each.  When the first laptops started surfacing, I started moving the equations into basic and then into spreadsheets.  It was good practice and led to the downfall of our squadron's mainframe computer.

I hope that's just the movie's working title and you can come up with something better before the box office release. 😂


Release title will be "Crash: The Downfall of Mainframe Computing"
 
2021-01-18 7:35:39 PM  

Twilight Farkle: Snotnose: More info.  They were hardbound from the late 60s or early 70s.  I suspect they were on some assembly language, but they may have just been high level concepts.  The books were a set, the second took over where the first ended.  The book sleeves were red (one book) and blue (the other one), I don't know what the actual cover looked like.

Dad was an EE working on military aircraft.  It was in the 80s when I was getting paid to write 8086 assembly that I asked dad about them.

Every page explained a concept, and at the bottom would be something like:

x = 4
y = x + 3
What is the value of y?

3.  goto page 72
4.  goto page 24
7.  goto page 34

[Fark user image 400x321][Fark user image 228x625]
[Fark user image 400x240]

That sounds like a TutorText! https://hackaday.com/2020/08/28/a-tale​-of-tutor-texts/

[Fark user image 300x400][Fark user image 250x360][Fark user image 245x384][Fark user image 255x364]


Do these look familiar? (https://babel.hathitrust.or​g/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015033508683&view=1u​p&seq=7 via https://hackaday.com/2017/10/13/comput​ers-that-never-were/


Those actually look like good candidates.  Keep in mind I was 10-13 years old when dad brought them home and I latched onto them, and it was late 60s/early 70s when I did so.  By the time I was 18 ('76) I'd moved out of my parent's home and had a TRS-80 to play with.  Actually, that timeline isn't correct (I need to run fsck (or smartmontools, but they prolly won't work on 62 y/o wetware) on my brain).  I moved out when I was 18, graduated in '76 (also when I was 18, but I was 17 at the time), and bought the TRS-80 in '79.

Also, the red book had a red ribbon bookmark, the blue a blue ribbon bookmark.  Think the bibles my parental units gave me as a kid.  Those bibles were the main reason I moved out the day dad couldn't call the cops on me, took 10 years to repair those relations.
 
2021-01-18 7:49:58 PM  

Twilight Farkle: Snotnose: More info.  They were hardbound from the late 60s or early 70s.  I suspect they were on some assembly language, but they may have just been high level concepts.  The books were a set, the second took over where the first ended.  The book sleeves were red (one book) and blue (the other one), I don't know what the actual cover looked like.

Dad was an EE working on military aircraft.  It was in the 80s when I was getting paid to write 8086 assembly that I asked dad about them.

Every page explained a concept, and at the bottom would be something like:

x = 4
y = x + 3
What is the value of y?

3.  goto page 72
4.  goto page 24
7.  goto page 34

[Fark user image 400x321][Fark user image 228x625]
[Fark user image 400x240]

That sounds like a TutorText! https://hackaday.com/2020/08/28/a-tale​-of-tutor-texts/

[Fark user image 300x400][Fark user image 250x360][Fark user image 245x384][Fark user image 255x364]


Do these look familiar? (https://babel.hathitrust.or​g/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015033508683&view=1u​p&seq=7 via https://hackaday.com/2017/10/13/comput​ers-that-never-were/


I think you nailed it but google isn't giving enough pictures to be sure.  They're available at a couple  libraries within 100 miles of me, but said libraries are closed due to infectionspren or somesuch.
 
2021-01-18 8:59:47 PM  

Wine Sipping Elitist: [Fark user image image 425x573]
[Fark user image image 240x349]

I learned by meticulously typing in the programs printed in the pages of these books. I remember making a hot air ballon sprite. Neato!

Then I made a password protect program for games I didn't want my big brother to play, but I messed up the password and locked myself out :(


Apple is missing out not putting a floppy drive in the iWatch.

/the floppy in the pic is pretty much the same size as a micro sd card, which is pretty cool.
 
2021-01-18 10:24:30 PM  

Snotnose: I think you nailed it but google isn't giving enough pictures to be sure. They're available at a couple libraries within 100 miles of me, but said libraries are closed due to infectionspren or somesuch.


There was a series -- many have fallen into public domain and are available (for online scrolling and maybe PDF downloading) here: https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/ls?f​i​eld1=ocr;q1=tutortext;a=srchls;lmt=ft

One frustrating hint -- Google the phrase "owes Mr. Lehman (a non-lawyer sociologist and TutorText staff member) its ... bookmark, but noted that it was bound significantly near the front of the book"

Google doesn't have a cached version of the page because FARK THE DMCA and y ou'll end up with the useless https://www.jstor.org/stable/29760910 link (unless you have buddies in academia) which does not have enough data to support my wild-ass guess that TutorText authors may have included bookmarks with each book.

Repeatedly querying Google with substrings reveals more text: "Legal education owes Mr. Lehman (a non-lawyer sociologist and TutorText staff member) its thanks for furnishing some programmed legal learning which can now be praised, condemned or actively ignored. The TutorText Technique (An excerpt from Chapter 1, What is a Contract?) (Page 1) Whether you realize it or not, you enter into many contracts every day of your life [FARK THIS MIGHT TAKE A WHILE] "bookmark, but noted that it was bound significantly near the front of the book. "

No idea if that's a red herring -- could just be whatever text Google scraped from some unrelated article in the same journal -- but if that review of some Tutor Text author's primer on contract law substantiates the claim that at least one TT book came with a bookmark...

I did manage to find a list of most of the books in the series, and evidence that some of the computer-related ones came out in multiple editions: https://gamebooks.org/Series/457/Show​

Good luck!
 
2021-01-19 11:14:52 AM  

Wine Sipping Elitist: [Fark user image 425x573]
[Fark user image 240x349]

I learned by meticulously typing in the programs printed in the pages of these books. I remember making a hot air ballon sprite. Neato!

Then I made a password protect program for games I didn't want my big brother to play, but I messed up the password and locked myself out :(


THANK YOU!

I was trying to think of the name of the coil bound book my Dad had that I learned from and it was that one. (Commodore 64 Programmer's Reference Guide).

https://archive.org/details/Commodore​_​64_Programmers_Reference_Guide_1983_Co​mmodore

Ah, memories.
 
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